The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Svornost -- February 21, 1882
    Wanted: a Bohemian Alderman in the 6th Ward

    We have heard this wish expressed for the past six or seven years or more, but so far there has been nothing much accomplished in this regard. On April 4th the citizens of Chicago will elect eighteen aldermen to the City Council, and here is added again, that the Bohemian Citizens of the 6th ward again are making it known that they want their ward, which is settled by Bohemians nostly, represented in the City Council by a Bohemian. This time it was our countrymen in the lime quarry section who took the initial steps toward the accomplishment of their desires.

    They held a public meeting on the premises of Mr. A. Skvora and resolved to support unanimously a Bohemian candidate and already they have picked a man whom they intend to carry through victoriously in the coming election. He is Mr. Josef Lalak, who has lived in America since he was nine years old and is well-known, not only among our own countrymen, but to the public of other nationalities.

    We take it for granted, that there will be meetings in other precincts of the 6th ward soon, in order to decide about the coming election, whether 2a candidate should be set up in opposition to the renowned Ed. Cullerton, who, to secure his election again, is fighting tooth and nail. If a Bohemian candidate is to be offered it is desirable that all factions in the 6th ward come to some understanding soon. With that we add that a second independent political meeting will be held on Sunday, February 26, on the premises of Mr. Skvora.

    We have heard this wish expressed for the past six or seven years or more, but so far there has been nothing much accomplished in this regard. On April 4th ...

    Bohemian
    I F 1, I F 5
  • Svornost -- November 04, 1882
    Prokop Hudek for Senator.

    The Bohemian citizens settled in the 11th senatorial district, which comprises the 5th ward and part of the 6th ward, will have an opportunity to cast their votes for the Bohemian candidate for State Senator, proposed by the Workingmen's Party in October, and supported by every progressive citizen of other parties.

    The coming election for county and state officers will be held on Tuesday, November the 7th, and our Bohemian candidate is Mr. Prokop Hudek, well known in Chicago in Bohemian and American circles.

    Mr. Hudek's candidacy for senator was without his personal solicitation and without his knowledge. The progressive republican citizens nominated him unanimously and have not placed other candidates against him. Considering his honesty, prudence and willingness, they will support his election to the fullest extent.

    We have our Bohemian candidate for the State Senator, and if all Bohemian citizens will fulfill their duty as good citizens and good Bohemians, we will have next Wednesday our own senator, the first Bohemian State Senator in United States history.

    2

    Nobody can deny that Mr. Hudek is a most capable man for senator; that is known by our republican friends of other nationalities, and that is why they decided to support his election harmoniously and zealously, regardless of the fact that Hudek was not their candidate but proposed by workingmen only.

    We hope our Bohemian citizens won't be indifferent to our countryman, but will all appear at the polls to make his election certain.

    The Bohemian citizens settled in the 11th senatorial district, which comprises the 5th ward and part of the 6th ward, will have an opportunity to cast their votes for the ...

    Bohemian
    I F 1, I F 5, IV
  • Svornost -- March 26, 1883
    Local Politics: John Kalal for Alderman of the 6th Ward.

    The Independent Democratic Club in the 6th ward proposed at yesterday's meeting our countryman John Kalal for the City Council.

    It was done to have our own representative in the City Council. There are in the 6th ward 1,700 Bohemian votes, which will be deposited for Mr. Kalal. As Mr. Kalal was not present at the meeting, there was sent to him a committee to notify him of the nomination. He was thankful for the honor, which was shown him and promised to answer, tonight, if he would accept the candidacy.

    John Kalal is a foreman in the Harvey lumberyard.

    The Independent Democratic Club in the 6th ward proposed at yesterday's meeting our countryman John Kalal for the City Council. It was done to have our own representative in the ...

    Bohemian
    I F 2, I F 5, IV
  • Svornost -- March 04, 1884
    Meeting of the Bohemian Citizens in the 8th Ward; V. Kaspar Accepts the Proposed Candidacy for Alderman

    Yesterday a meeting was held in the hall of the Bohemian-American Sokol. The meeting was called by the Bohemian Independent Club and had an exceptionally large attendance. About sixty Bohemian citizens were present and the majority of them joined the club. The meeting was opened by the chairman, Mr. Patera, who expressed his satisfaction at the large attendance and encouraged persistence. "We must open our eyes and look forward before we will vote for a German or an Irishman."

    Mr. Valis said, "This is the only way to organize if we are to support and elect a Bohemian. I don't trust the Germans and unless we unite ourselves firmly, our Bohemian candidate will be ashamed of the number of our votes."

    2

    Mr. Patera approved of this idea but was of the opinion that in case the club members decided that it would be impossible to elect a Bohemian candidate, the support of a German would be more prudent than the support of an Irishman.

    Mr. Mracek agreed with the idea and said that the Irishmen are insolent and selfish, supporting only themselves and absolutely indifferent to the needs of other nationalities, that's why every Bohemian citizen should agitate among his friends and neighbors to vote for a Bohemian candidate.

    Mr. Novak reminded us how convenient it is when we can use our mother language in public office and it would be really a shame should the Bohemians show their indifference in the coming election.

    Mr. Benes stated that many of the present citizens are not acquainted 3with our relation to the German electors. He explained all important relations we ever had with the Germans and concluded his speech with the statement that since the Germans are willing to support us, why should we antagonize them.

    Mr. Valis expressed his confidence in the Bohemians. "They should understand that they must be victorious," he said. "We have a Bohemian on the Board of Education and in the Public Library, both chairmen, respectively. Why should we not have a Bohemian alderman?"

    Mr. Chladek spoke next, "It is important to elect a Bohemian alderman who would be honest and take the greatest care of the interests of his ward." He mentioned that he had information that the Germans are not thinking so favorably of us, that the Germans intended to cooperate with us only temporarily, and that they have organized themselves only for our interests. Four of their committees will support someone named Nagel, an Irishman, and the Bohemians will be persuaded to vote for him. The speaker said 4that such a German program would give us no privileges at all. He supposed that the Germans would keep faith with us but he was in doubt about it. The Bohemian committee should act very carefully, because some of the Germans will vote for Nagel and others for Feldman, consequently it would be wise for Bohemians to have a candidate of their own, one that possesses the fullest confidence of the people. Such a one is Vaclav Kaspar.

    Mr. Vaclav Kaspar then took the floor and said, "I am elected as a candidate for alderman in the 8th ward, but it is not so easy to win the election as it looks. We have very many Irishmen in our ward. It is possible that in this part of the ward a Bohemian could be elected, but in the west part of the ward the Irish majority is considerable, and as the Irish voters remain united, everything does not look so promising. What relates to me , my family and my business, does not permit me to accept the nomination, because I would be forced to neglect my business."

    Mr. Geringer then spoke: "Today's meeting was called for the purpose of 5finding out if we Bohemians are sufficiently strong in voting power."

    His advice was not to undertake the forcing of our candidate, but to delay in this for the future, and to support this time anybody rather than Lawler. Our first attention should be directed to the removal of Lawler from office, and this could be achieved only by setting against him a very strong candidate, worthy of general confidence. It may be a Bohemian or a German. Bohemian or German we don't want him to lose to an Irishman.

    It would be even more advisable to elect this time a good, honest Irishman if only to defeat Lawler, who is running on the Independent ticket. The question before us should be, should we elect a Bohemian candidate at this meeting or support the German candidate?

    Mr. Chladek could be very useful in helping us to decide this question by telling us, approximately, the number of voters in our ward that are 6Bohemians, Germans, and Irish respectively. Ad. Chladek answered: "In the west part of the ward there are many Americans and only a few Irishmen and they would unite against the Irish candidate, because they dislike the Irish methods of administration. The total number of voters in our ward is about 3,000. Should all the Americans, the better class of Irishmen, the Bohemians and the Germans, unite in our ward, there would be about 1,300 votes for the Bohemian or German candidate. This number of votes would enable the Bohemian or German candidate to win because there would be more candidates in the field and none of them would be able to poll this number of votes. The Bohemian votes amount to about 300."

    Frant Kaspar insisted that the members should not retreat from putting a candidate in the field, but should appoint him at once and at the meeting that was then going on.

    Mr. Patera again asked whether it would be absolutely impossible for Vaclav Kaspar to accept the nomination.

    7

    Mr. Chladek brought out the fact of the jealousy that exists between the Irishmen. "There is no doubt," said Mr. Chladek, "that the Irish will have two, three or maybe four candidates in the field. Consequently, we should be able to win with our candidate. This is possible, but it demands hard work. We should canvass from house to house, talk to the voters and persuade them to go to the polls and vote for our Bohemian candidate." Mr. Chladek further contended that Bohemian votes could not be bought for money and that there were no Bohemians of bad character that could be diverted from the Bohemian candidate.

    J. Kralovec said that the committee had done everything that could be done according to its promise and that all Bohemians would be very pleased if their candidate would accept the nomination. The committee was advised to turn its attention to the fact that the whole procedure of election and 8nomination should not be made public before the suitable time. We have considered Vaclav Kaspar as the only person among us Bohemians to be worthy of representing us honorably in the City Council, and to be supported not only by Bohemians but by other nationalities.

    Vaclav Kaspar took the floor and said: "The committee fulfilled its duty in visiting me. At that time my answer was that it would be impossible for me to accept the nomination. However, since then my countrymen have insisted that I do their will, and since their will is law for me I accept the candidacy. (Stormy and long applause.) I demand, however, that the committee takes care to see that we have numerous and better attended meetings and to find means by which a more serious interest in future election may be instilled in our Bohemian citizens."

    Mr. Geringer pointed out that the Germans were divided into two factions and some of their votes would undoubtedly pass to us, which would make our problem easier. He was of the opinion, however, that it would be 9a question as to whether we are supported by others.

    Mr. Kostner then said: "We will make a big step forward when we elect today our candidate, even in case he should be defeated. There are very many voters among the different parties and nationalities who would vote for anybody, so long as it was not Lawler. We have gained very much since Vac. Kaspar accepted the candidacy, because he is known as an exceptionally honest man, not only among the Bohemians, but among the Germans and the Irish.

    Mr. Kaspar will gain many German and Irish votes, consequently he has the best chance to be elected."

    Mr. Kralovec paid attention to the fact that we can expect victory if there will be seven candidates on the ticket. He warned the audience that this coming Thursday there would be a joint meeting with the Germans and we must be represented very strongly if we wish our candidate to defeat 10the German candidate. Everyone should be present. There are always around one hundred Germans at their meeting, and our maximum today is sixty members.

    Mr. Novak was given the floor and said: "We don't need thieves and men of leisure in the City Council. V. Kaspar could have been a member of the Council long ago, but he hesitated to accept the nomination because he is an honest man." (The speaker was reprimanded by some of the members many times because of his discouraging remarks against the candidate.)

    Mr. Svojze then said, "Why should we not nominate a candidate? There is no reason for it. Should our candidate win, it will be all right; should he be defeated, it will be all right too. Win or lose we will gain experience that will be of benefit to us in the future."

    Mr. Suesland thought it was a hard problem to get a candidate. A motion 11was then passed that on the morrow (Wednesday) a meeting should be held again. Tomorrow's meeting would be a day before the general meeting of Bohemians and Germans. The purpose of the meeting of tomorrow was to gain new members and to be more strongly represented at the joint Bohemian-German meeting.

    The meeting adjourned.

    Yesterday a meeting was held in the hall of the Bohemian-American Sokol. The meeting was called by the Bohemian Independent Club and had an exceptionally large attendance. About sixty Bohemian ...

    Bohemian
    I F 2, I F 5, I F 3, I C, IV, I F 6
  • Svornost -- March 06, 1884
    The Bohemian Citizens of the 8th Ward Are in Array; Their Platform

    Yesterday's Bohemian meeting held in the Gymnasium of Sokol Association was attended by eighty or ninety citizens. This is very consoling proof that the Bohemian citizens have begun to understand their duties. The meeting was opened by the chairman, Mr. Patera, and the minutes of yesterday's meeting were read and adopted. Sixty new members were enrolled and one hundred and twenty-five is the total number of members of the Bohemian Independent Club.

    Mr. Kralovec gave a detailed report of the meeting of the joint committees, which elected Mr. Lussem as chairman, and Mr. Chlader as secretary. We are publishing this a little ahead of time and we must add that the chairman of the meeting, Mr. Lussem, came to the conclusion that Vaclav 2Kaspar would be the best candidate. He has known him since before the Big Fire in Chicago. The reason that this was published ahead of time was explained as indispensable because, as Mr. Lussem states, some of the German members of the joint committee intended to wait two weeks longer. Mr. Lussem was against this idea. The motion for immediate voting was passed and Vaclav Kaspar was elected candidate by a vote of nine to five. This report was accepted and the speaker proposed a reading of the platform, which was done by the secretary.

    "The Platform of the Independent Club of the 8th Ward. Whereas, the citizens of the 8th Ward know and have seen for years that our representatives in the City Council do not care for the welfare of the citizens, therefore, it is resolved, that in the future only those candidates will be supported who will direct their activities strictly in accord with the platform, set up by the citizens of said ward.

    3

    I. Every case of corruption committed by the City Council shall be immediately revealed to the public.

    II. All improvements like building of new bridges, sewers, paving of streets, shall be properly constructed under strict supervision.

    III. To watch and enforce with all power the regulation that only workers of good reputation shall be hired for city constructions, not lazy and idle men patronized by the ward politicians as has been practiced heretofore.

    IV. To see to it that personal liberty shall not depend on the individual opinion of hot-headed fanatics.

    V. To strive with earnest zeal towards the refusal of further concessions to the present monopolists."

    4

    This platform was adopted by the committee and by the candidate.

    Mr. Kralovec proposed at this meeting to nominate the speakers for tomorrow's joint meeting. Ad. Chladek and J. Benes were proposed. Both accepted.

    T. Kralovec suggested Mr. Lussem as chairman of tomorrow's joint meeting, because Mr. Lussem always acted with dignity and was always very friendly towards the Bohemians. Mr. Lussem accepted.

    Mr. Chladek referred to the disagreements occurring ordinarily on election day, and all kinds of disorder during the counting of the votes. We are in need of dependable people who will watch that the counting is honest, because it is the only way we can win, and we know well that the police officers are against us Bohemians and all are working for Irishmen.

    5

    A long and effective speech by Ad. Chladek pleased everybody. The following additional speakers were elected for tomorrow's joint Bohemian-German meeting; Dr. Kohout, J. Kralovec and Jiri Nikodem.

    Concluding this meeting, there was an appeal to the Bohemian citizens of the 8th ward to appear at tomorrow's meeting in Houdrov Hall in large numbers and not to be confounded by the Germans. Strive to gain the respect of other nationalities is what was recommended.

    Tomorrow's meeting is the most important one and it should be demonstrated to the Germans and to the other nationalities, with whom we will fight, that we know how to handle our affairs and that it would be unwise for them to scorn our Bohemian power in the 8th ward.

    Yesterday's Bohemian meeting held in the Gymnasium of Sokol Association was attended by eighty or ninety citizens. This is very consoling proof that the Bohemian citizens have begun to understand ...

    Bohemian
    I F 2, I F 6, I F 5, I F 3, I C
  • Svornost -- March 06, 1884
    Frant Fucik Accepts the Candidacy in the 6th Ward

    Yesterday evening the Club of the Bohemian Citizens of the 6th Ward held a meeting at 582 Center Avenue. Frant Fucik was nominated as candidate for alderman of the 6th ward. He accepted the nomination, and being a Republican, he will run on the workingmen's ticket. In all probability he will receive all the votes against Cullerton.

    Yesterday evening the Club of the Bohemian Citizens of the 6th Ward held a meeting at 582 Center Avenue. Frant Fucik was nominated as candidate for alderman of the 6th ...

    Bohemian
    I F 5, IV
  • Svornost -- March 08, 1884
    The Independents in the 8th Ward; the General Meeting of the Bohemians and the Germans; Vaclav Kaspar Nominated

    Yesterday's meeting of the Bohemians and the Germans in Houdkov Hall was very largely attended, over 300 people were present. The Bohemian citizens appeared in large numbers.

    The meeting was opened by the chairmen of the Bohemian and German Clubs, M. Patera and Finkensieper. The first explained the purpose of this meeting. His speech was translated into the German language by J. Kralovec. A motion was then made to elect a chairman for the day who spoke both Bohemian and German. The motion was carried and Ad. B. Chladek was elected chairman, with Em. Haase and Lussem as secretaries. Another motion was carried that only members of the club had the right to vote at this meeting. There were enlisted at this meeting forty-five new members, the total number of members being raised in this way to 171 names. The result of yesterday's election was made public and read in German, then translated 2by Ad. B. Chladek into Bohemian. It was decided that each of the candidates that were present be introduced to the audience which they were privileged to address. Vac. Kaspar was called to the rostrum.

    Mr. Kaspar said, "Citizens, it is not the first time that my candidacy has been proposed by one or the other party or nationality, but I never have accepted the nomination, not because I liked to stand against the people's will, but simply that I decided not to go into politics. I would do the same now too, but the pressure exerted upon me this time by the citizens of this ward was so predominating that it is clear to me it is their most ardent wish. I have accepted the nomination this time. I will serve you, dear citizens, and promise to champion the platform which was presented to me before my nomination. I am not the kind of man who would fight to be nominated, and in case you should be able to find a more eligible candidate, I am ready to resign right now. And to agitate for him with all my influence." (Great applause.)

    The next speaker to be called was J. J. Kestler, who said: "He does not intend to accept the nomination, but he feels grateful and expressed his 3thanks for the distinction with which the citizens honored him. He is out of town most of the time and it would be impossible for him to attend to the office duties punctually. (Applause.) He advised the citizens to nominate as candidate a man generally known and of honest character. He informed the citizens that in the 8th Ward a club of English-speaking citizens is in a stage of organization and it would be advisable to defer the nomination."

    Mr. Kaspar was of the opinion it would not do any harm to the cause.

    Mr. Clemens and Finkensieper defended the motion and informed the audience that they had no candidate at present. They suggested eight days delay to be able to find one.

    Mr. Kralovec protested and declared that the purpose of today's meeting was to select the mutual candidate, consequently he demanded that a candidate be selected immediately.

    Mr. Kaspar admonishes the audience that only harmony could bring about 4the desired results. He was ready to resign in case he should be the cause of some disagreement.

    Next spoke Mr. Lussem. He rebuked the Germans for their discord in very keen words and was absolutely against delaying the matter. It was his opinion that the German committee had as much time for the nomination of their candidate as did the Bohemians. (Applause.)

    "The Germans," Mr. Lussem then said, "were indolent, they refused to pay attention to the candidates proposed by Democrats or Republicans. If a new club was organized it would be useful for us, if its intentions were honest. Our mutual meeting of today was called for the purpose of nominating a candidate, therefore he should be nominated at once. I doubt whether it would be possible to find a more suitable candidate than Mr. Kaspar. If everyone should work to the best of his ability the whole enterprise would succeed."

    Mr. Kralovec then took the rostrum. He praised Mr. Kaspar and recounted 5the benefits if he should be elected. Kaspar was the only man who could compete with Lawler. He made a motion to nominate Mr. Kaspar as the mutual candidate.

    P. Finkensieper proposed to defer the nomination for eight days. Mr. Clemens supported the proposal. Mr. Geringer was against it and stood firmly for an immediate nomination.

    Mr. Clemens was given the floor and said, "Citizens, the first meeting of the Bohemian Club was very weak and it is very surprising to observe today such a large number of Bohemians. My judgment is to delay the nomination to a date when the Germans will be present in a larger number."

    After long debate and many speeches pro and con, it was decided to nominate a candidate at once. Every member was to mark on the ballot the name of his candidate and his own name. The ballots were tabulated carefully. The result of the voting was as follows: Vaclav Kaspar, 129 votes; Kestler, 1; and Boehmer, 1.

    6

    Mr. Kaspar was called in and the result of the voting was announced to him. He expressed his thanks for the confidence and, in case of his election, he promised to do for the citizens all in his power to merit the expression of confidence of the members present. (Great applause.)

    The mutual committee will have its next meeting the coming Saturday in the American Sokol hall.

    The meeting adjourned.

    Yesterday's meeting of the Bohemians and the Germans in Houdkov Hall was very largely attended, over 300 people were present. The Bohemian citizens appeared in large numbers. The meeting was ...

    Bohemian
    I F 5, I C, IV
  • Svornost -- October 07, 1884
    Our Countryman Mr. Schlesinger Is Elected.

    The Bohemian candidate for State Representative is elected. Yesterday the lists from the last two precincts were counted and this decided the election between Schlesinger and Meyers. The report from the book of the Election Supervisor shows that Schlesinger had 6,835 votes and Meyers 5,994 votes. His election mainly depended on the Bohemians. We have proved that we are able to unite and to fight valiantly for our countryman, who as a result emerged victorious.

    The Bohemian candidate for State Representative is elected. Yesterday the lists from the last two precincts were counted and this decided the election between Schlesinger and Meyers. The report from ...

    Bohemian
    I F 4, I F 5, I F 1, IV
  • Svornost -- May 04, 1891
    From the City Hall

    The first Bohemian that was honored by the new Mayor's office, is a well-known, talented Bohemian politician, Mr. Quido Chot, who is a member of the present legislature.

    Mr. Chot was appointed chief clerk in the States Attorney's office. This office is not only profitable, but honorable; great experience and ability are required in this department. Mr. Chot's activity in the legislature in the past attracted the attention of a wide circle.

    From present reports which were received, it is proved that his capabilities have been recognized.

    The first Bohemian that was honored by the new Mayor's office, is a well-known, talented Bohemian politician, Mr. Quido Chot, who is a member of the present legislature. Mr. Chot ...

    Bohemian
    IV, I F 5
  • Svornost -- May 13, 1891
    Second Bohemian in Office

    The first Bohemian to be provided with an office was Mr.Chot, a well known enthusiastic Republican.

    The second is Vaclav Lusk, a Harrisonian Democrat. He was named Water Tax Assessor. It seems that the Democrats, in the pursuit of politics, are just a little better educated than Republicans. However, Mr. Lusk is capable of filling the office to which he was named and it does not matter to which party he adheres.

    The first Bohemian to be provided with an office was Mr.Chot, a well known enthusiastic Republican. The second is Vaclav Lusk, a Harrisonian Democrat. He was named Water Tax Assessor. ...

    Bohemian
    I F 4, I F 5