The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1906
    Bohemian National Cemetery.

    p. 1--The regular monthly meeting of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association was held yesterday evening in the Bohemian-American School's hall on Eighteenth street.

    The meeting was called to order by the chairman, Mr. John Pech, about 8 p. m., and after the secretary, Mr. St. Halik had read the faultlessly written minutes of the previous meeting, the treasurer, Mr. Husak, read out the bills payable, which were then placed before the meeting for consideration.

    Since the bills were for work done on the cemetery or for materials delivered there, they were accepted as read and ordered paid. There were really many bills this time, and the treasurer, Mr. Joseph Jurka, looked somewhat sour when he was paying them.

    The secretary then read the communications received.

    2

    All these letters reported names of new delegates elected by several lodges and associations which send representatives to the Association.

    The committee on distribution of New Year's gifts to the Bohemian liberal schools announced that the Association had made the following donations; to the Saturday and Sunday School Association, $85; to the C. S. P. S. (Czechoslovak Benevolent Society) School on Eighteenth street, $105; to the Ladimir Klacel School at Nineteenth and Leavitt streets, $85; to the Vojta Naprstek School on Kedzie avenue, $105; to the Komensky School, $55; to the Palacky School, $85; to the Jonas School, $55; to the Grand Crossing School, $55; to the Children's Nursery, $80; to the Bunker Street School Association, $105; to the Irving Park School, $50; and to the Bohemian Working-Men's Singing Society School, $50.

    Thereafter various motions were made for the good of the Cemetery. And here it seems to us that the delegates committed a sad mistake, which they will regret some day. We refer to the resolution in regard to Section P, which lies around the Soldiers' Monument.

    3

    It was resolved to adorn this section as a beauty-spot of the National Cemetery and also as a gathering place for all celebrations held in the Cemetery, especially for the Decoration Day ceremonies. For that reason no more burial-lots will be sold in this section. This is entirely in order, and we believe that it will be beneficial to the Cemetery. However, we condemn the consequent resolution, to disinter and rebury the bodies which were there interred some time ago. This resolution was adopted in spite of many warnings and objections.

    The National Cemetery is not a private undertaking; it is, so to speak, the property of the liberal-minded Bohemians of Chicago, and everyone has its success at heart. The majority of those interested would probably say what Mr. Kostner said yesterday. "Why rebury these bodies in another place? The section will be made over into the most beautiful spot in the Cemetery, and surely the remains will rest there just as well as anywhere else."

    4

    We are firmly convinced that the resolution should be reconsidered, and that another vote taken in the matter.

    Nothing else of importance was discussed. From the bookkeeper's report we learn that in the month of December disbursements were $7,208.05, and receipts were $5,240.34. The money on hand at the end of November was $4919.08, and this leaves the present balance $2,951.37.

    In December nine lots were sold for $1,015; seventy-five bodies were buried, and $979.89 was placed in the reserve fund.

    p. 1--The regular monthly meeting of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association was held yesterday evening in the Bohemian-American School's hall on Eighteenth street. The meeting was called to order by ...

    Bohemian
    III C, II B 2 f, I A 1 d, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 08, 1906
    Association for Higher Education.

    p. 3--The meetings of the executive committee of the "Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání" Association for Higher Education) are growing more and more interesting. At the meeting of March 16, 1906, the application of a Czech student was approved; he is ambitious to continue his studies at the University of Iowa. The applicant has produced all his preliminary examination papers and other references.

    A gift of $50 by the widow of Jos. Dusil for the "Dusil Fund" was accepted with gratification. At the meeting of May 4, 1906, opened by Professor Simek, there was proposed the printing of a "National Stamp," the money yielded by the sale to be directed into the proper channels for the advancement of national pursuits. The respective motion made by W. F. Severa will be discussed at a later meeting.

    2

    Jan. Havlasa, Czech writer, who was in Chicago at the time, suggested a plan for the levying of a "National Excise" for national purposes, in the form of a stamp of negligibly small denomination. This excellent proposition evoked no more response than a few articles in newspapers and comments by correspondents.

    Mr. Vaclav Snajdr offered the same idea in the paper Dennik Novoveku, but nobody paid any attention. Dr. Jaroslav E. Vojan contributed to the formation of a plan for the introduction of the stamp and its use for the national work to be done. Mr. Severa, feeling that the idea should not be abandoned, considered all that had been said in favor of it, and resolved to come to the Association for Higher Education with a compact proposition in order to realize Havlasa's original idea.

    3

    Mr. Severa offered to pay for one full year all initial expenses connected with the introduction of the stamp, under the condition, in accord with Dr. Vojan, that one half of the money gathered in this way would be given to the Association for Higher Education, one quarter to Czech schools, and one quarter for charitable and humanitarian purposes.

    Within one year it should be apparent whether the stamp has proved a paying proposition, and if so, further expenses can be payed from the income.

    The division of the second part of the yield, for school and charitable purposes, should be placed in the care of a committee of newspapermen who have taken a friendly attitude toward the Association for Higher Education. The collections from the sale of stamps are to be deposited in a bank, and be kept under the control of the Association of Higher Education and distributed once a year.

    4

    The creation of a stamp should prove of great benefit for the Bohemian people in America, and should become a fact after the executive committee has passed favorably on the idea.

    All of the Czech painters are invited to submit sketches of drawings which could be used as a basis for the design of the stamp. Further information about the shape and size of the stamp, the use of the name,etc. may be obtained from W. F. Severa, Box 569, Cedar Rapids, Ia. Specific information on the use and propagation of the stamp shall be published in the near future.

    The executive committee of the Association of Higher Education.

    p. 3--The meetings of the executive committee of the "Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání" Association for Higher Education) are growing more and more interesting. At the meeting of March 16, 1906, the ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 d, II B 2 d 1, III B 2, III A, III H, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1911
    (No headline)

    Classes in drawing and modeling for Czech boys, have been established in the Svatopluk Czech park, upon permission of the Park Board. Two young and gifted Czechs have been procured as teachers: Mr. M. Mrazek for drawing and Mr. Joseph L. Patek for modeling. Their excellent qualifications are evident from the samples of work exhibited by the pupils in the park building, open to the public until January 8. The school affair will be closed on that date by a lecture on "History of Architecture," delivered by Mr. J. M. Mrazek. Due credit for the success of the educational enterprise is given Mr. W. Kolacek, president of the Park Board, Mr. Karel Vopicka, Mr. Kaspar, and also to Mr. Triner, Mr. Hajicek, and Mr. Novak for generous contributions to the prize fund, out of which the prizes for outstanding achievements of pupils were purchased.

    Classes in drawing and modeling for Czech boys, have been established in the Svatopluk Czech park, upon permission of the Park Board. Two young and gifted Czechs have been procured ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, II A 3 a, I A 1 d, III B 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- December 07, 1911
    Matice VyŠŠÍHo VzdĔLÁNÍ Annual Report of Matice Vyssiho Vzdelani for the Fiscal Year 1910-1911

    The eighth administrative year of the Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání (Council for Higher Education), closed with the termination of the 1910-1911 school year. The Executive Committee hereby....renders its annual report to the public, especially to the numerous national societies and individuals who supported this organization materially and morally and who are interested in its activities.

    The Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání is fulfilling the task....of making loans to indigent students and encouraging Czech youth to [secure] higher education, so that they may in the future successfully compete with citizens of other nationalities with whom they will come in contact.....We report 2with pleasure that this task is properly understood by our wards.

    In addition to many requests for information, the office of the Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání, during the past year, received a total of thirty requests for loans. It can be noticed with satisfaction that the real purpose of this organization is now better understood than was the case in the earlier years of its existence.....The largest loan received by any individual for a single school year amounted to $250; the smallest was $75; the average per student was $168. The total amount of loans made was $2,685.

    Aid was extended to thirteen male and three female students during the past year. According to States, students were given assistance as follows: Illinois, 3; Iows, 2; Nebraska, 2; New York, 2; Texas, 2; Pennsylvania, 1; Michigan, 1; Wisconsin, 1; Missouri, 1; and Minnesota, 1.

    3

    According to institutions at which they studied, students were divided as follows: Illinois, 1; Iowa, 2; Missouri, 1; Nebraska, 2; Texas, 1; Wisconsin, 1; Washington, 1; Chicago University, 1; Cornell University (New York), 1; Columbia University (New York), 1; Pennsylvania State College, 1; Texas State Normal, 1; Minnesota State Normal, 1; Olivet College (Michigan), 1.

    Due to the generosity and support of the societies and numerous individuals, the Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání thus far has not had to refuse any really deserving case because of a lack of funds in its treasury. Nevertheless, no one should think that there is a surplus or an idle fund in the Matice's treasury. On the contrary, in this report the executive committee feels compelled to call attention to the fact that with the closing of the financial report, the treasury shows a very small balance, barely sufficient to aid students during this school year. Because this 4report is issued after all students have been to their schools, we can say in passing that during the present school year, 1911-1912, the Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání is assisting sixteen students, to whom aid amounting to $2,915 was granted for this year. It must also be considered that this undertaking is growing, and that in the future more and more applications can be expected. For that reason, the executive committee hereby calls upon our Bohemian national societies and generous individuals for continued support, so that the work of the Matice Vyssiho Vzdelani may be continued with success during the next year.

    In presenting this annual report of the activities of the Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání during its eighth administrative year, we beg all friends, donors and people of good will, to give it their attention. At the same time, we hereby express sincere gratitude to all donors and friends for their contributions. In closing we take the liberty to again emphasize that 5this undertaking can fulfill its cultural and humanitarian mission only with the effective help of our Bohemian-American people. Therefore, we take the liberty of submitting a sincere and urgent supplication for all to remain favorably inclined toward the Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání, and to support it in its efforts, both morally and materially. We are also seeking new patrons and friends and we beg them not to refuse their aid to this undertaking. We also ask all those into whose hands this report will come, to call attention to this organization and endeavor to gain many new friends for it.

    For the Executive Committee of the Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání:

    B. Šimek, chairman;

    P. A. Korab, secretary.

    6

    Financial Report of the Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání from July 1910 to July 31, 1911

    [Translator's note: List of individual contributors, two columns, omitted.]

    Contributions (by States)

    Nebraska, $170.65; Maryland, $26,00; Wisconsin, $81.90; Ohio, $70; Missouri, $68; Iowa, $207.30; Illinois, $400.50; Texas, $290.25; Arkansas, $5; Oklahoma, $14.50; Montana, $10; Michigan, $10; North Dakota, $10; Pennsylvania, $13; New Jersey, $5; Kansas, $9; Minnesota, $21.25; California, $2; South Dakota, $10; New York, $7.95; total $1,432.30.

    7

    New York, $400; Michigan, $200; Missouri, $200; Illinois, $310; Texas, $325; Wisconsin, $200; Pennsylvania, $200; Nebraska, $225; Iowa, $400; Washington, $150; Minnesota, $75; total $2,685.

    Repaid by Students (by States)

    Ohio, $200; Illinois, $485; Nebraska, $100; New York, $50; Oklahoma, $20; total $855.

    Recapitulation

    Cash in treasury July 26, 1910, $2,799.13; contributions from individuals $356.05. Contributions from societies: the Cesko-Slovanské Pedporujici 8Spolky (Czech-Slavonic Benevolent Societies), $236.50; the lodges of the Západní Česko-Bratrská Jednota (Western Bohemian Fraternal Association), $157; the lodges of the Jednota Ceských Dam (Bohemian Women's Union), $84; the lodges of the Sesterská Podporující Jednota (Mutual Benevolent Sisterhood), $112; the lodges of the Slovenské Podporující Jednoty Statu Texas (Slovak Benevolent Society of the State of Texas), $155.50; miscellaneous lodges, $160.95. Interest from bank deposits, $78.80; interest from the Vojtech Mašek Endowment Fund, $40.40; interest from the Joseph Dusil Endowment Fund, $10.10; loans repaid by students, $885. The grand total is $5,086.43. Loans to students for the year 1910-1911, $2,685. Balance in treasury, $2,401.43.

    National Stamps [Seals]

    Cash on hand July 26, 1910, $418.70. Miscellaneous receipts for national stamps, $59.85; interest from bank deposits, $10.79. Total $489.34.

    9

    Disbursements

    Postage, $47.25; for journal Komensky, $195; incorporation fee, $1.50; envelopes, $1.10; secretarial work, Mr. J. Štĕpan, $75; total $319.85. Balance in treasury, $169.49.

    Financial Summary

    Cash on hand in Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání treasury, $2,401.43; national stamps, $169.49; Bohemian-American Endowment Fund, $590.92; Joseph Dusil Endowment Fund, $250; Vojtech Mašek Endowment Fund, $1,000; total cash as of July 31, 1911, $4,411.84.

    Joseph Mĕkota, financial secretary;

    W. F. Severa, treasurer.

    The eighth administrative year of the Matice Vyššího Vzdĕlání (Council for Higher Education), closed with the termination of the 1910-1911 school year. The Executive Committee hereby....renders its annual report to ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 d, III B 2, II D 10, II D 1, III H
  • Denní Hlasatel -- July 11, 1915
    To Bohemian Students

    The Matice Vyssiho Vzdelani (Council for Higher Education) is at this time again accepting applications of Bohemian students of both sexes who desire to continue or finish their studies but lack the means of doing so. Such students who conform to the requirements of the executive committee of the Matice Vyssiho Vzdelani may receive a loan of not more than $250 for one school year. This loan is made on a pledge of honor by the applicant. The committee's requirements are the following:

    "The applicant--without regard to sex--must be of Bohemian origin, have a command of the Bohemian language, and feel as a Bohemian, must be known for his or her decent, moral life, and prove his ability to make a success of advanced studies. The applications will be considered only of those students who have no means of supporting themselves in their school work. The 2applications must be accompanied by a recent photograph of the applicant, and a statement as to which of the institutions of higher learning approved by the committee the applicant desires to attend. The committee requires evidence of at least one semester of successful studies at the indicated institution prior to the approval of the loan. The applicant will give the committee a pledge to finish the full course of studies he is engaging in and will cause the authorities of the selected institution to report periodically to the committee on his progress."

    The loan may be given only to students following an academic course, a course in engineering, or preparing for a teaching career. "Academic courses" are those generally designated in university prospectuses as "collegiate courses," "the college of liberal arts," "the college of arts and sciences". In such courses the following subjects are taught: modern and classical languages, history, philosophy, political economy, exact and natural sciences. In teachers' and engineering courses, subjects germane to such professions are 3being taught.

    The students' particular attention is called to the absolute necessity of acquiring or having, by way of preparation for the courses, a thorough command, in grammar and every other respect, of the English language. This is really a matter that it should not be necessary to mention, since every student should feel the indispensability of knowing well the language of the country, the language used in all lectures and classes. Bohemian students have, in many cases, proved to have an insufficient knowledge of English, having failed to pass in that subject, and having failed in other subjects just because of poor knowledge of English. The executive committee therefore considers it necessary that every applicant present a report (issued by an accredited high school or an equivalent institution) proving that he has the required knowledge of the English language.

    The applications must be submitted in a special form, the blanks for which 4will be furnished upon request addressed to the committee, and must be in the hands of the committee prior to, or on, August 15, 1915. The applications must contain the names of teachers or professors to whom the applicant is well known and to whom the committee may refer for the necessary information concerning the applicant. Letters, inquiries, and applications for loans should be addressed to the secretary of the committee, Mr. P. A. Korab, Iowa City, Iowa.

    For the executive committee of the Matice Vyssiho Vzdelani:

    B. Simek, president,

    P. A. Korab, secretary

    The Matice Vyssiho Vzdelani (Council for Higher Education) is at this time again accepting applications of Bohemian students of both sexes who desire to continue or finish their studies but ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 d, I A 1 a
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 24, 1917
    Invitation to Membership in the Czech Literary Association

    Czech patriots and friends of Czech culture are being approached by the Czech Literary Association (Česká Literární Společnost) to support the aims of this organization by becoming members.

    Since the introduction of the Czech language into the curriculum of the Carter Harrison High School, its pupils and teachers have felt the dire need of educational supplies, especially schoolbooks. The Czech-American National Council (Česko-Americká Národní Rada) has made the first step to remove these shortcomings by publishing a Czech primer. This book was to be used for two and a half years of study, and in different grades. It did not, however, fill the purpose. It so happened that in some of the higher grades students of the Czech language were forced to discontinue their study as a result of lack of schoolbooks, and the number in some classes gradually declined, while others had to be abandoned. A similar 2fate threatens Harrison High school and the High school in Berwyn. To save these and other schools, the Literary Association was created.

    This organization began by publishing Czech books containing selections from Czech literature. Authors such as Erben, Nĕmcová, Havlíček, Wenzig, Čelakovský, and Tille are represented. These plans received the heartiest approval on the part of Czech parents. In the forefront of demand, however, is a grammar of the Czech language, translated in the English language, which is designed for the use of the American-born pupil, and also for the many native Czechs who wish to perfect themselves in their maternal tongue. It also ought to serve ambitious pupils of other nationalities who are eager to undertake the study of Bohemian, which would aid in making foreigners better acquainted with our literature.

    The grammar is being prepared now, and will be ready for publication at the beginning of the next school year. This will involve considerable 3expense, which is expected to be defrayed from the contributions of those interested in the plan. Help us toward the realization of our aim. God forbid that the sons of the nation which gave a Jan Amos Komenský to the world should forget their maternal tongue for lack of the necessary funds.

    The dues are $5 per year; life membership $10; charter membership $20. Members will receive all books published through the Association free of charge. -For the Czech Literary Society, signed: Clara M. Claus, chairman; James H. Dibelka, treasurer; Jaroslav Nigrin, secretary.

    Czech patriots and friends of Czech culture are being approached by the Czech Literary Association (Česká Literární Společnost) to support the aims of this organization by becoming members. Since the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 3, I A 1 b, I A 1 d, III B 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- August 09, 1918
    To Czech Students

    Matice Vyssiho Vzdelani (Mother [or center] of Higher Education) will again accept applications from students of both sexes who are gifted, and who desire to continue of finish their studies, but are without means to do it.

    Part of the expenses, not exceeding $250 for one year of academic study, will be loaned without interest, merely upon their word of honor, to students, who can meet the requirements prescribed by the Executive Committee. These requirements are printed below for the careful perusal of prospective applicants:

    "They [applicants] must, regardless of sex, be of Czech descent, must have a command of the Czech language, and be conscious of their Czech descent. They must be leading a decent moral life, and must be able to pursue the more advanced studies. Only students without sufficient financial means to continue their studies independently will be accepted. They should enclose their photographs, 2and should state which institution of higher learning approved by the Executive Committee they wish to enter.

    "Before the loan is accorded to him, the student must prove his qualification by one half year's work at that institution. He must declare his intention of completing a full academic course, and agree that the faculty of his institution send reports on his progress to the Executive Committee at certain intervals."

    Only academic, teachers', or engineering courses are on the list approved by the Committee.

    The "academic" courses are termed in University catalogs "Collegiate Courses," "College of Liberal Arts," "College of Arts and Sciences". The respective lectures are on modern languages and literature, history, philosophy, agriculture, exact and natural sciences. In teachers' and engineering colleges, the related subjects are taught.

    3

    Students should give particular attention to preparatory studies in English grammar, to which great importance is attached. Czech students are frequently deficient in this branch and do not pass in other subjects on account of insufficient knowledge of the language in which all lectures are delivered.

    The Committee lays particular stress upon proficiency in the English language, and insists upon proof in the form of examination papers from accredited high schools, or other schools on the same level.

    Applications must be sent to the Executive Committee on or before September 1. They should contain references from fellow citizens and teachers. Address the applications to P. A. Korab, Iowa City, Iowa. For the Executive Committee of the Matice:

    B. Simek, chairman;

    P. A. Korab, secretary.

    Matice Vyssiho Vzdelani (Mother [or center] of Higher Education) will again accept applications from students of both sexes who are gifted, and who desire to continue of finish their studies, ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 d, I A 1 a