The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- March 03, 1919
    Chicagoans Ask Independence for Albania

    An appeal for Albanian independence was cabled today to Premier Clemenceau and Secretary of State Lansing, in Paris, by delegates representing seventy-two Albanian organizations in America. The message was as follows:

    "Americans of Albanian descent and Albanian residents of Illinois, natives of Kossova and Chameria, respectfully appeal to Your Excellency for independence and territorial integrity for Albania, including the provinces of Kossova and Chameria, in accordance with the noble principles enunciated by President Wilson and the Allied Powers."

    An appeal for Albanian independence was cabled today to Premier Clemenceau and Secretary of State Lansing, in Paris, by delegates representing seventy-two Albanian organizations in America. The message was as ...

    Albanian
    III B 1, III H, V A 1
  • The Albanian Journal -- January 02, 1922
    An Albanian College for Albania Next Summer Methodist Episcopal Church Extend Helping Hand to Shkipetars (Albanians) in Educational Endeavor

    The Albanian government has appealed to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America to undertake the establishment of an American college in Albania. Bishop Blake answered the call of Albania and sent to that country Professor Elmer E. Jones, director of the School of Education of Northwestern University at Evanston, to investigate educational conditions and future possibilities.

    Professor Jones spent three months in Albania last summer, visiting all the important cities and towns and studying the ancient traditions and the national customs of the Albanian people. He returned to Evanston a few weeks ago, and in his extensive report to the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church of America strongly recommends the establishment of an American college in Albania.

    2

    "The Albanians are eager for education," says Professor Jones," and anything American is cherished by them. I was royally welcomed by them everywhere, and the people showed great appreciation of my interest in their educational welfare. Officers of the government and mayors of various towns came out many miles to meet me and escort me to their respective towns. The people swarmed around me, and I was overwhelmed with the kindness shown me. The hospitality of the Shkipetars, as the Albanians call themselves, is beyond comparison. I sat at banquets with them from early evening till midnight almost everyday, and I had a very pleasant time with them.

    "While in Tirana I had daily conferences with the leaders of the government. They were enthusiastic at my proposition and promised me every possible assistance in making the American college a success. The Albanian government is willing to offer suitable buildings for the college and will place at our disposal large tracts of land that we may need for agricultural experimental purposes. Albania is an undeveloped country but is very rich in resources. The land in the plains is very productive, and the mountains provide excellent 3pasture for the sheep and goats. Every family in the country keeps a certain number of sheep and goats, and there is a possibility of developing a wood industry.

    "The enthusiasm of the Albanian children amazed me when I visited them in their schools. They amused me with their beautiful songs which they sang everywhere I went. But the condition of the schools in many towns is appalling and books are scarce. It seems to me as though Albania is clamoring for education with hands outstreched toward America, and I have promised the Albanians American assistance in their educational development.

    "When the Albanian boys hear that we have a college at Valona they will climb the mountains and come to it. Education has been utterly neglected in Albania in the past, on account of the political animosity that has been prevalent in the Balkans, and Albanians who sought an education were compelled to study foreign languages, because their own language was prohibited by the Ottoman government, which ruled the country for four centuries, and was anathematized by the Greek Orthodox Church. Notwithstanding the Turkish government, the 4Greek clergy was a dominant force in the political affairs of Albania. Fortunately, both Turkey and Greece lost their political game in Albania, because since 1912 political authority has been in the hands of the Albanians themselves, who have proved their ability to run the government.

    "The Christian Albanians just lately severed their allegiance to the Greek Church and declared the Albanian Church independent."

    The Albanian government has appealed to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America to undertake the establishment of an American college in Albania. Bishop Blake answered the call of Albania and ...

    Albanian
    III H
  • The Albanian Journal -- January 02, 1922
    The Albanian College for Albania Next Summer.

    Methodist Episcopal Church extends helping hand to Shkipetars (Albanians) in educational endeavor.

    PROF. JONES PRAISES ALBANIANS.

    p. 1.- The Albanian government has appealed to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America to undertake the establishment of an American college in Albania. Bishop Blake answered the call of Albania and sent to that country Prof. Elmer E. Jones, director of the School of Education of North-western University of Evanston, to investigate educational conditions and future possibilities.

    Prof. Jones spent three months in Albania last summer visiting all the important cities and towns and studying the archaic characteristics and the 2national customs of the Albanian people. He returned to Evanston a few weeks ago and in his extensive report to the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church of America strongly recommends the establishment of the American college in Albania.

    "The Albanians are eager for education," says Prof. Jones, "and anything American is cherished by them. I was royally welcomed by them everywhere, and the people showed great appreciation of my interest in their educational welfare. Officers of the government and mayors of various towns came out many miles to meet me and escort me to their respective towns. The people swarmed around me, and I was bored with kindness shown me. The hospitality of the Shkipetars, as the Albanians call themselves, is beyond comparison.

    "I sat at banquets with them from early evening till midnight almost everyday and I had a very pleasant time with them.

    3

    "While in Tirana I had daily conferences with the leaders of the government. They were enthusiastic at my proposition and promised me every possible assistance to make the American college a success. The Albanian government is willing to offer suitable buildings for the college and will place at our disposal large tracts of land for agricultural experimental purposes such as we may need. Albania is an undeveloped country but with very rich resources. The land in the plains is very productive and the mountains provide excellent pasture for the sheep and goats. Every family in the country keeps a certain number of sheep and goats, and there is a possibility for the development of the wool industry.

    "The enthusiasm of the Albanian children amazed me when I visited them in their schools. They amused me with their beautiful songs which they sang everywhere I went. But the condition of the schools in many towns is appalling and books are scarce. It seems to me as though Albania is clamoring for education with outstretched hands toward America, and I have promised 4to the Albanians American assistance in their educational development.

    "When the Albanian boys hear that we have a college at Valona they will climb up the mountains and come to it. Education has been utterly neglected in Albania in the past on account of the political animosity that has been prevalent in the Balkans, and Albanians who sought education were compelled to study foreign languages because their own language was prohibited by the Ottoman government, which ruled the country for four centuries, and anathematized by the Greek Orthodox Church. Notwithstanding the Turkish government, the Greek clergy was a dominant authority in the political affairs of Albania. Fortunately, both Turkey and Greece lost their political game in Albania, because since 1912 political authority is in the hands of the Albanians themselves who have proved their ability to run the government.

    "The Christian Albanians just lately severed their allegiance to the Greek Church and declared the Albanian Church independent."

    Methodist Episcopal Church extends helping hand to Shkipetars (Albanians) in educational endeavor. PROF. JONES PRAISES ALBANIANS. p. 1.- The Albanian government has appealed to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America ...

    Albanian
    I A 1 a, III H, III C
  • The Albanian Journal -- May 01, 1922
    Mr. Donuski New Secretary of the Journal

    Petro Donushi was elected secretary of The (Albanian) Journal at a directors' meeting on April 26.

    Petro Donushi was elected secretary of The (Albanian) Journal at a directors' meeting on April 26.

    Albanian
    II B 2 d 1
  • The Albanian Journal -- August 05, 1922
    Celebrate American Recognition of Albania Chicago Albanians Show Appreciation in Message to Secretary of State

    [Telegram]

    "Chicago, Illinois.

    "July 28, 1922.

    "Honorable Charles E. Hughes,

    "Secretary of State,

    "Washington, D. C.

    "Albanians of Chicago congratulate State Department for recognizing Albania.

    "The Albanian Journal

    "John Adams."

    2

    [Acknowledgment of Telegram]

    "Department of State,

    "Washington, D. C.

    "August 2, 1922.

    "John Adams, Esquire.

    "P. O. Box 118,

    "Chicago, Illinois.

    "Sir: The receipt is acknowledged, with thanks, of your telegram dated July 28, expressing to the Secretary of State the congratulations of the Albanians of Chicago on the occasion of the recognition by this government of the independence of Albania.

    "For the Secretary of State,

    "Robert Woods Bliss, Third Assistant Sec'y."

    [Telegram] "Chicago, Illinois. "July 28, 1922. "Honorable Charles E. Hughes, "Secretary of State, "Washington, D. C. "Albanians of Chicago congratulate State Department for recognizing Albania. "The Albanian Journal "John Adams." ...

    Albanian
    III H
  • The Albanian Journal -- December 06, 1922
    The Albania's Independence Celebrated in Chicago.

    Prof. Elmer E. Jones tells Albanians of Educational Needs and Future Development of Shkiperia (Albania).

    MORE SCHOOLS FOR THE COUNTRY

    p. 1.- It was a glorious time when the natives of Albania now residing in Chicago, Argo, Ill., and Milwaukee, Wis., heard Prof. Elmer E. Jones, director of the School of Education of the Northwestern University of Evanston, Illinois, relate to them about his trip to Albania.

    The Albanians assembled to celebrate the Tenth Anniversary of the Independence of Albania, and to express their loyalty to the American flag for the privilege they enjoy under it in shaping the destiny of their country. The Albanians believe that while the races of mankind are represented by their own distinct languages, the nations and governments of the world are symbolized 2by the flags. The Albanian flag is highly esteemed by the Albanians, and at all patriotic meetings the flag of Albania and The Stars and Stripes lend their grandeur to the occasion.

    A committee had been appointed to invite Prof. Jones who had been on a trip to Albania recently for the purpose of investigating the educational needs of that country. Dr. Francis La Piana presided at the meeting.

    Prof. Jones was greeted by the Albanians as the first American who went to see what Albania is like and brought a complete report of the present conditions and future possibilities of the Balkan countries. During his lecture he brought Albania to Chicago for the Albanians who listened attentively to his experiences in going from town to town on mule's back, by carriage and automobile; how the people in Albania welcomed him and the hospitality shown him during his trip through the land of the Shkipetars (Albanians). The possibilities regarding the education of their countrymen and the development of the natural resources made the audience see the realization of the Albanian national aspirations.

    3

    Prof Jones spoke for two hours. He related how his friends in Evanston advised him to carry a gun with him because they thought Albania was a lawless country full of bandits, but since he was going for a peaceful purpose he decided not to carry the gun and that he felt perfectly safe without it among the supposed bandits. He spoke of Albania as a law-abiding country with an effective government, but greatly in need of educational facilities. He commented on the eagerness of the people for learning and their interest in the establishment of schools.

    Prof. Elmer E. Jones tells Albanians of Educational Needs and Future Development of Shkiperia (Albania). MORE SCHOOLS FOR THE COUNTRY p. 1.- It was a glorious time when the natives ...

    Albanian
    III H, I A 1 a
  • The Albanian Journal -- December 06, 1922
    Albania's Independence Celebrated in Chicago Professor Elmer E. Jones Tells of Educational Needs and Future Development of Albania

    It was a glorious occasion when the natives of Albania now living in Chicago, Argo, and Milwaukee heard Prof. Elmer E. Jones, director of the School of Education at Northwestern University in Evanston, tell them of his trip to Albania. The Albanians had gathered to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the independence of Albania, and to express their loyalty to the American flag for the privilege they enjoy under it of shaping the destiny of their country. The Albanians believe that while the races of mankind are represented by their own distinct languages, the nations and governments of the world are symbolized by their flags. The Albanian flag is highly esteemed by the Albanians, and at all patriotic meetings the flag of Albania and the Stars and Stripes lend their grandeur to the occasion. A committee had been appointed to extend an invitation to Professor Jones, who had been on a trip to Albania recently for the 2purpose of investigating the educational needs of that country. Dr. Francis La Piana presided at the meeting.

    Professor Jones was greeted by the Albanians as the first American who went to see what Albania is like and to bring back a complete report of the present conditions and future possibilities of the Balkan countries. During his lecture, he brought Albania to Chicago for the Albanians, who listened attentively to his experiences in going from town to town on muleback, by carriage, and by automobile; how the people in Albania welcomed him, and the hospitality shown him during his trip through the land of the Shkipetars (Albanians). The possibilities regarding the education of their countrymen and the development of the country's natural resources made the audience see the realization of the Albanian national aspirations.

    Professor Jones spoke for two hours. He related how his friends in Evanston advised him to carry a gun with him because they thought Albania was a lawless 3country, full of bandits, but since he was going for a peaceful purpose he decided not to carry a gun. He said he felt perfectly safe without it among the alleged bandits. He spoke of Albania as a law-abiding country with an effective government, but greatly in need of educational facilities. He commented on the eagerness of the people for education and their interest in the establishment of schools.

    It was a glorious occasion when the natives of Albania now living in Chicago, Argo, and Milwaukee heard Prof. Elmer E. Jones, director of the School of Education at Northwestern ...

    Albanian
    III B 3 a, III H
  • The Albanian Journal -- April 10, 1923
    (No headline)

    Albanian's tobacco monopoly, recently held by the British, has not been extended and is open to American interests. American business men will sail from New York, June 2nd, with Professor Elmer E. Jones and a group of Albanians, for a tour of Albania.

    Albanian's tobacco monopoly, recently held by the British, has not been extended and is open to American interests. American business men will sail from New York, June 2nd, with Professor ...

    Albanian
    I C, I A 1 a, III H
  • The Albanian Journal -- April 10, 1923
    Invest Your Capital in the Future of Albania Government Invites U. S. Money by Professor Elmer E. Jones, Northwestern University

    American businessmen are usually quite shrewd in seeing the opportunity to make excellent investments in foreign countries. Thus far, however, there has been little interest manifested in Albania as a field in which American capital might be invested with assurance of good returns. This is doubtless due to the fact that men of means know little of the opportunities for development in the Balkans, particularly that newest of the republics, Albania.

    There is probably no country in the world in which the possibilities for commercial and industrial development are greater than in Albania. When we consider that the present government is not yet four years old, and that for hundreds of years the Turkish government has prevented any industrial or 2commercial development whatsoever in Albania, the possibilities are clearly apparent. Every enterprise which will eventually be introduced into the country is now in the crudest stages of formation. Capital is needed in every department of the emerging civilization.

    Albania needs railroads, truck roads, bridges, agricultural implements, modern vehicles, factories, the development of her water power, development of her mines and oil wells, improvement of harbors, and all other natural resources. The country is teeming with potential industries. Tobacco is grown, but not upon the large scale of which the country is capable. The wool industry offers one of the greatest possibilities for development, in as much as the mountains are covered with sheep and goats, and yet there is not a woolen mill in the country. Albania abounds in many varieties of fur-bearing animals, yet the fur industry is undeveloped. Tons of fine fruit rot in the orchards of Albania every year because the canning industry is unknown. Many parts of southern Albania are covered with olive orchards, and yet there are no factories for making oil, or for canning and preserving.

    3

    We could go on indefinitely, almost, with the great opportunities to establish various sorts of businesses in Albania, having a two-fold result: first, large and easy incomes on the investment; second, a distinct service to the people of Albania.

    At the present time, there are many people in Albania out of employment, or at least not engaged in continuous and remunerative employment.

    American capital introduced into the country should bring about industrial development, give the people much needed employment, and assist in the general production of wealth. The leaders of Albania are very desirous that the American capitalists be stimulated to make investments in their country. They would much prefer American capital to that of any other country.

    From what I learned from representatives in the Parliament, the government would welcome American business men to the country, and would show them every courtesy in investigating the various fields for industrial development.

    American businessmen are usually quite shrewd in seeing the opportunity to make excellent investments in foreign countries. Thus far, however, there has been little interest manifested in Albania as a ...

    Albanian
    III H
  • The Albanian Journal -- April 10, 1923
    Good Reasons to Help Albania

    Albania, a little known Balkan nation, was an ancient country long before the dawn of Grecian history. Commercial prospects in this new republic on the Adriatic Sea, three fourths the area of England, have been little exploited by American or European business.

    There are many reasons why Albania should appeal to American capital. The government is sound, and the finances of the country are in good shape, there being an unusually large gold supply for such a small European nation. The government is seeking American co-operation in education, commerce, agriculture, finance, and in church relationships. As Albania goes, so go all the Balkan states.

    Ten thousand Albanians who have attended school in the United States have returned to Albania to assist in the development of this Balkan country.

    2

    The mountains--and Albania is indeed mountainous--contain an abundance of gold, silver, copper, and other ore. American capital will be interested in this.

    Albania's tobacco monopoly, until recently held by the British, has not been extended, and is now open to American interests. American businessmen will sail from New York, June 2, with Professor Elmer E. Jones and a group of Albanians for a tour of Albania.

    Albania, a little known Balkan nation, was an ancient country long before the dawn of Grecian history. Commercial prospects in this new republic on the Adriatic Sea, three fourths the ...

    Albanian
    III H