The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 13, 1871
    (Advertisement) A Wish

    Fritz Wirth, varnisher foreman with T. M. Brunswick, is urgently requested by several of his friends, not to give his son the name Alexander von Humboldt, but to call him rather Napolium or Christoph - Columbus, because the name A. von Humboldt appears to them just a bit extravagant.

    Fritz Wirth, varnisher foreman with T. M. Brunswick, is urgently requested by several of his friends, not to give his son the name Alexander von Humboldt, but to call him ...

    German
    V B
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 06, 1871
    [A Devastating Forest Fire]

    In the last edition prior to the Chicago fire, the Illinois Staats Zeitung carries an article on "Forest Fires," from which we quote:

    The persevering drought has made creeks and rivers disappear in the fir region of Northeast Wisconsin, and has so dried up the soil that it has become almost impossible to stop a forest fire. The forest fires that ravage the dense woods along the 120 mile-long Green Bay Railroad, are without example. Lives undoubtedly will be lost..... Along the track of the Chicago and Northwestern, the fire advances on both sides between Despere and Appleton. The town of Green Bay itself is threatened. Firebrands are flying into the streets. In Kewanee County, eighty dwellings have been burned.

    In Minnesota, the fire began on the prairie south of Breckinridge, near the Pacific Railroad, and spread, driven by strong winds, with incredible speed over hundreds of miles. One-hundred and fifty miles from its starting point, it reached the "Big Woods" and consumed the tall trees up to Smith's Lake. The damage is immense. The storage house of D. Graff and Company, twenty miles this side of Breckenridge, was consumed by the flames, which had to make a jump 2of forty feet over the track of the Pacific Railroad to reach it.

    In Indiana and Ohio the woods on either side of the Toledo Wabash and Western railroads are in flames, between Antwerp, Ohio, and New Haven, Indiana. The fire has still not been checked.

    In the last edition prior to the Chicago fire, the Illinois Staats Zeitung carries an article on "Forest Fires," from which we quote: The persevering drought has made creeks and ...

    German
    V B
  • [Association documents] -- October 29, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    Report of the Committee on Place of Worship stating that a certain Jno. H. Ross had rented Standard Hall, but the Board of Directors of the hall reserved the right for the use of the Sinai Congregation.

    Moved and carried, that the committee shall take further charge of the matter and see that the privilege be reserved for the congregation in the lease, and that a pulpit be provided.

    Moved and carried to appoint a committee to see that a melodeon be temporarily procured for our worships and that the choir and leader be notified to attend the worship as usual.

    Report of the Committee on Place of Worship stating that a certain Jno. H. Ross had rented Standard Hall, but the Board of Directors of the hall reserved the right ...

    Jewish
    III C, V B, I B 4
  • [Association documents] -- November 05, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    Moved and carried that the committee on procuring a place of worship, try to secure Olivet Presbyterian church, for next Sabbath and get terms for the future.....Moved and carried that invitation be sent the Zion Congregation to participate in the service and inaugural sermon of Dr. Kohler, also to ask Zion Congregation to let us have the use of their choir for next Saturday.

    Moved and carried that the committee on procuring a place of worship, try to secure Olivet Presbyterian church, for next Sabbath and get terms for the future.....Moved and carried that ...

    Jewish
    V B, III C, III B 3 b
  • [Association documents] -- September 29, 1872
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    It was moved and seconded and carried that the minimum prices of pews be as follows: Nos. 1, 2, and 3, 87, 89, 138, and 136 to be fifty dollars ($50), No. 4, and all long side seats forty dollars ($40), and all short side seats, thirty dollars ($30).

    It was moved and seconded and carried that the minimum prices of pews be as follows: Nos. 1, 2, and 3, 87, 89, 138, and 136 to be fifty dollars ...

    Jewish
    V B
  • [Association documents] -- April 30, 1875
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    Resignation of Leon Mandel and H. Rosenblatt were presented and the Secretary, on motion, requested to inform these gentlemen that their respective resignations cannot be entertained before the amount of their respective subscriptions toward the Building Fund is liquidated.

    Resignation of Leon Mandel and H. Rosenblatt were presented and the Secretary, on motion, requested to inform these gentlemen that their respective resignations cannot be entertained before the amount of ...

    Jewish
    V B, IV
  • The Occident -- December 09, 1879
    Editor Occident

    Some days ago a question was raised who was the first office holder of the Jewish race in Chicago? It was stated to be David Kohn, Esq., who was appointed City Clerk by the Honor John Wenthworth when Mayor of Chicago. It would be interesting to have a brief chapter from the pen of "Long John" on his recollection of the first Jew in Chicago, or some sketches of the activity of the early Jews in our city. If you can prevail upon him to write something, it will no doubt be interesting.

    Census Taker

    Some days ago a question was raised who was the first office holder of the Jewish race in Chicago? It was stated to be David Kohn, Esq., who was appointed ...

    Jewish
    V B
  • Chicago Tribune -- February 05, 1880
    The Dragon and the Sun

    Regarding the eclipse the reporter found a vast variety of opinions among the Chinamen he interviewed. One man, a clever merchant, said that the cause of the dark space on the Sun was because the Moon was behind it. He tried hard to make the reporter comprehend this theory for some time, and than suddenly seized a piece of smoked glass from a friend's hand and said: "Alle same this, no smokee, see through; smokee, no see through. Sabe?" After considerable study of the object, and further smoked glass demonstration, the reporter was made to understand that in the Chinaman's opinion the Sun is a hole through which a glowing light shines down upon the world and that at that time the Moon had slid in behind the Sun in some irregular manner and this obscured a portion of the light by blocking up a portion of the hole.

    The Chinese listeners to this explanation all grunted their assent, and the reporter moved on to approach a group of lower and more ignorant Chinese.

    2

    Here, for a wonder, the Chinamen were found with their eyes wide open. This proved that the eclipse was a matter of stupendous wonder for them. One Chinaman then explained that the Sun and Moon were having a quarrel, and the evident conclusion was that the Sun had got the worst of it and came off with a black eye.

    The reporter carried a small piece of smoked glass with him. One amazed Chinaman looked hard and long at the reporter's use of the glass, and then asked to have it. He was given it, and after viewing the Sun with it a moment, delightedly passed ot to a friend who clapped it to his eye, with the smoked side toward him.

    Regarding the eclipse the reporter found a vast variety of opinions among the Chinamen he interviewed. One man, a clever merchant, said that the cause of the dark space on ...

    Chinese
    V B
  • Chicago Tribune -- February 12, 1880
    The Celestials

    The Chinese residents for the time being sated with the festivities of the New-Year which have been occupying their attention for the past few days, have settled down to business, but live joyously in the anticipation of the pleasures which are to be enjoyed next Sunday.

    The earlier part of the day is to be devoted to social calls, and in the evening a grand gathering is to take place at a point not yet determined upon. Every mail brings to the residences of the various Chinamen envelopes containing the visiting cards of their friends in New York. Philadelphia, and other Eastern points, and from places in California and elsewhere. These, together with those distributed by local callers, will be carefully hoarded until the New-Year week has passed away, when they will be posted conspicuously upon the walls to serve as an indication of the number of friends possessed by the occupant of the place.

    2

    In this matter the Chinese take great pride, and the American lady whose door is besieged with callers from early in the morning until late at night on January 1st.,is not more an object of envy or admiration in her own set than is the Mongolian whose mementoes of similar attention palpably out-number the collections made by his fellow-countrymen.

    The Chinese residents for the time being sated with the festivities of the New-Year which have been occupying their attention for the past few days, have settled down to business, ...

    Chinese
    III B 3 a, V B
  • Jewish Advance -- July 23, 1880
    (No headline)

    Hebrew Almanac

    for

    5641

    Price - 25¢

    Address: German News Co.

    45 La Salle St.

    Chicago, Illinois.

    Hebrew Almanac for 5641 Price - 25¢ Address: German News Co. 45 La Salle St. Chicago, Illinois.

    Jewish
    V B