The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 04, 1871
    [The German Patriotic Aid Society]

    The Executive Committee of the German Patriotic Aid Society decided in its last meeting to bring its existence to a close by giving a short report on its past activities to the German citizens of Chicago.

    The German mass meeting on July 17, 1870, in the Turn Hall on the North Side, elected a Finance Committee to collect funds in the City of Chicago for the victims of the Franco-Prussian war. The list of members of this committee has undergone frequent changes. The committee has found it very difficult to secure members who-quite aside from collecting money - would attend its meetings with some punctuality and regularity. The committee consists now, at the moment of its dissolution, of the following gentlemen: H. Greenbaum, G. Schneider, C. Butz, E. Dietzsch, W. A. Hettich, Y. Rosenthal, P. Hand, G. Snydacker, C. Degenhardt, A. Erbe, F. Annecke, E. Prusing, A. Seuberth, A. Blum, T. Rutishauser, H. Lieb, and Y. Beiersdorf.

    By and large, the oft-repeated calls to the societies and lodges (especially to the latter) have met with but small success. Some of the Turn and singing societies have collected not quite inconsiderable sums (Chicago Turn Community $250, Schleswig-Holstein Association $132, Salem Community $130, 2Employees of Western Banknote and Lithographing Company $118, Veterans' Club of the 24th Illinois Regiment $100, etc), by far the most, however, was contributed through the Fair which the German women arranged ($17,335) and, next, through the picnic conducted by the Musicians Union ($2,304).

    After the first two weeks of its existence the Finance Committee constituted itself as Executive Committee and undertook new functions: Correspondence at home as well as with Germany; agitation in the villages and small towns; information to the press in the German interest; protest against the actions of our ambassador, Washburn, in Paris; organization of meetings, and the distributing and dispatching of collected funds, etc.

    The Executive Committee of the German Patriotic Aid Association of New York called a convention of all German Patriotic Aid Associations of the United States, to Chicago on August 18, 1870. The convention took place, but its resolutions were not accepted by the Chicago G. P. Aid Association, which retained its independence, and sent the money it collected directly to Germany. Altogether $29,554 were collected in Chicago; $10,645 in places outside Chicago; slightly more than $40,000 were expedited to Germany.

    The Executive Committee of the German Patriotic Aid Society decided in its last meeting to bring its existence to a close by giving a short report on its past activities ...

    German
    III B 2, IV, III B 4, V A 1, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 04, 1871
    [Political Matters]

    The German citizens of the western part of the 16th ward, the so-called Bavarian settlement, yesterday had their first meeting at 775 N. Halsted street, in order to consult and come to an agreement on who would be the best man to represent the common interests of this large and in part still "original" district of Chicago. The hall was filled to its capacity; about 100 prominent, long-time citizens, mostly German, discussed animatedly the selection of candidates.

    Mr. Carl Haussner was elected permanent chairman, and Mr. George Menzel, secretary - both by acclamation. Mr. Snyder gave the main address. He proved that no city district was so neglected by the City Council from beginning on as the Bavarian settlement. This German district counts for nothing in the eyes of the honorable aldermen. The numerous population has to pay more than its share into the city treasury without getting anything in return. Because it is a German district, nobody had thought to connect it with the city sewers or the gas and water pipes. Never since the district was settled has an alderman come from there. They hail without exception from the aristocratic eastern part of the 16th ward; and so it has come about that in the east everything has been fixed up and the value of real estate has been multiplied. 2While the western, German part, in many ways seem only a village, even though the people must pay the high city taxes.

    These conditions have engendered the determination to nominate this time a man from the Bavarian settlement as alderman; in the place of Tyler, Mr. B. Miller was recommended, and accepted the nomination. To report on other suitable candidates for alderman a committee of five was nominated, consisting of Messrs. Peter Regitz, Mathias Mathis, Edward Schmeisser, H. Russer, and J. H. Snyder.

    The German citizens of the western part of the 16th ward, the so-called Bavarian settlement, yesterday had their first meeting at 775 N. Halsted street, in order to consult and ...

    German
    I F 1, I C, V A 1, I F 6, I F 4, I F 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 21, 1872
    The Evangelical Community in Chicago. By Rev. M. Stamm.

    Late in the summer of 1836, a considerable number of German families, mostly Alsatians, moved from the town of Warren, Pa., to the state of Illinois, and settled in four different groups, partly in the city of Chicago, at Dutchmans Point, and at Wheeling, Cook County; also at Naperville, and at Sharon on the Rock River. As they were in these vast prairies without any pastoral care, they addressed together several petitions to the Western Conference of the Evangelical Community, whose activities at this time extended to Ohio, to send them a preacher. In the first days of July, 1837, a member of the Conference, Rev. F. Boos, undertook the long and hazardous journey on horseback, arriving in Chicago, after endless hardships, on July 23rd. He was the first Protestant minister to proclaim God's word in the German language to the Germans of Chicago, 2Dutchmans Point, Wheeling, and Naperville. In these places he organized the first German Protestant communities in the Northwest, and made them elect so-called class leaders who would preside over their meetings till they could get their own ministers. This done, Rev. Boos immediately returned to his district in Ohio, which had an extent of 300 to 400 miles.

    For eight months these communities were without a preacher. Then the Western Conference took up activities in Illinois and sent Rev. M. Hauert. Mr. Hauert reached Chicago on September 3rd, 1838, and travelled, as the second German Protestant minister, to most of the German settlements in Illinois. His salary for a whole year then amounted to only $74.32. At the Conference he could report a total of 78 members in Illinois.

    3

    The first German Protestant church in all the Northwest states was built by the community in Wheeling of squared logs. Wheeling became the center of all church activities of this Protestant community. From 1840 on, every Sunday a German sermon was given in Chicago. In this year the Rev. J. Hoffert and Rev. D. Kern preached; in 1841 Rev. H. Stroh, and again D. Kern; in 1842 the Rev. Dr. Wahl and Rev. A. Plank. Wahl who, a few years later, left the church on account of his insufficient salary, became the first permanent German minister in Chicago. His community was given two excellent lots by the "Canal Camp ", corner of Wabash and Monroe, on which they built the first German-Protestant church in Chicago. Rev. G. Augenstein succeeded as minister in 1844.

    In 1854 the community sold its property for $6,000 and split into two parts, each receiving $3,000. One part built with this a church, first on S. Clark Street, sold it, and built in 1856 on the corner of Third Ave. and Polk Street, for $8,000, one of the best German churches of brick, which it still owns.

    4

    The Illinois Staats Zeitung gave a detailed account of its dedication. This community was again divided in 1864, on the initiative of the Illinois Conference, and on a far part of it, Rev. J. G. Escher built a pleasant mission chapel, on the corner of 12th and Union streets.

    The other half of the old Wabash Avenue community built a church, corner of N. Wells street and Chicago Avenue. Internal difficulties led to a division in 1869. One part built one of our best city churches under the leadership of Rev. J. Schafle on Second and Noble streets. The main part of the Wells Street community built in 1869 our biggest and finest church at Sedgwick and Wisconsin streets, under the active guidance of Rev. J. Miller. The third and smallest part of the old Wells Street community built a magnificent hall on N. Wells Street community built a magnificent hall on N. Wells Street with three beautiful shops; separated completely from the Evangelical community, and elected the Rev. J. P. Kramer 5its temporary minister. In the great fire this hall and the church on Wisconsin Street were destroyed. The Wisconsin Street community will rebuild early in the summer. The independent community has already built during the winter, under the supervision of the Rev. Augenstein. At the dedication they declared themselves willing to return to the Evangelical community..........

    To sum up: The Evangelical community now has five communities with 550 members, five churches and four parsonages, and 3,000 volumes in its libraries. Out of the five small communities of 1836 have grown in 36 years, six conferences with about 725 permanent ministers, 30,000 church members, 400 Sunday schools, and a flourishing college at Naperville. This church also possesses the oldest and largest German church paper in the U. S., with 20,000 subscribers distributed over most of the Western States. A similar spiritual propagation no church or organization in the whole United States can boast.

    Late in the summer of 1836, a considerable number of German families, mostly Alsatians, moved from the town of Warren, Pa., to the state of Illinois, and settled in four ...

    German
    III C, II F, III H, III G, III A, V A 1, I A 2 b, II B 2 d 1, III F
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 18, 1873
    Waldheim.

    The consecration of Waldheim Cemetery took place yesterday afternoon. About 5,000 persons were present. Charles Fricke said in his speech: "Good often proceeds from evil. The intolerance of some of the clergy prompted the question: How can we remedy this matter? Intolerance is caused by ignorance and many clergymen perceived in Societies, the nature of which they did not understand, dangers for Christianity. Lodges, which dared to hold ceremonies at the grave of a definite member, were frowned upon. The entering of the cemetery in uniform was forbidden.

    Thus, the idea of a cemetery independent of sects and intolerance came into the minds of many. An executive committee was formed. Great difficulty was encountered in the choice of a place. The plan of buying the place of Haase finally solved this problem. On the west side four and three fourths miles beyond the city limits, near the Desplaines River, Haase's park was found as an ideal place. The price for it was $115,900.00. The plan of the cemetery shows that there are 21,000 family graves. Besides the many private families, forty-four corporations are members of the Cemetery Society. The participating corporations are thus classified:

    2
    8 Odd Fellows' Lodges 3 Turnvereine
    8 Hermann's Sons 2 Order of Liberty
    5 Druids' Home 1 Working Men's Union
    4 Harugan Bismarck Club
    3 Rothmanner Hamburger Club
    3 Good Fellows Schleswig Holstein Club
    10 Free Masons Union Veterans' Supporting Club
    2 Cherusker

    The consecration of Waldheim Cemetery took place yesterday afternoon. About 5,000 persons were present. Charles Fricke said in his speech: "Good often proceeds from evil. The intolerance of some of ...

    German
    III C, V A 1, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 14, 1874
    Report from the Agent of the German Society.

    Immigration from Europe has stopped almost completely. The financial crisis, low salaries, and high taxes are responsible for it.

    But nevertheless there are poor people still coming over, who as soon as they arrive, ask the German Society for support. One Joseph Schmidt from West Prussia father of five children has been here for two months and is without any means. He said his friends had written telling him that Chicago was a bad place for work but a very good one for poor people.

    Many immigrants are also coming to Chicago because they rely on the proceeds from the fair. I wonder if regulations should not be drawn up concerning the people to be helped.

    Respectfully yours,

    Ch. Endres, Agent

    Immigration from Europe has stopped almost completely. The financial crisis, low salaries, and high taxes are responsible for it. But nevertheless there are poor people still coming over, who as ...

    German
    III G, V A 1, III H, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 26, 1878
    The First Cannstadter Festival ("Cannstadt" - City in Germany )

    Again the Swabians swore last Saturday evening when rain started to come down heavily. Yesterday morning bright and early the first Cannstadter public festival in Chicago began. The festival is still a new thing here, but has already in the old fatherland a string of sixty ancestors, and is also as "blueblooded" as could be desired. Its creator was King William who in 1818, for the first time, introduced in Cannstadt on the Neckar (river) an agricultural exhibition combined with a public festival.

    Here in America, Cannstadter public festivals existed only in New York and Philadelphia. Chicago steps in today as the third city.

    Yesterday morning the procession assembled at the Haymarket Square and went from there to Ogden's Grove. About five thousand people were assembled.

    2

    At four o'clock Mr. Demmler introduced Mr. William Rapp, who said, - "Rugged are you Swabians, awkward, stubborn, stiff-necked, but there does not exist a warmer hearted people, and not a more beautiful and lovelier land than yours." Such expressions I have heard quite often from North Germans, who, as American citizens have visited and seen the Swabian people.

    Let us look back gratefully to our old Swabian ancestors. Natives of the Palatinate and the Swabians were the first Germans who jointly in great numbers migrated to America and maintained their German nationality. They did this expecially in the first decades of the last century, to evade the oppression of their native princes and the misery caused by the French conquering Army. They originated the Palatinate and Swabian settlements in New York and in Pennsylvania, and their descendants have remained German until this very day.

    Among these Palatinate and Swabian immigrants at the beginning of the last century none were greater or more powerful than the Swabian, Johann Konrad 3Weiser, formerly the Mayor of Grossaspach, Wurtemberg (Germany). Bravely he fought with his immigrant German fellowmen against the English greed for land. He led them stubbornly from the Hudson to the Schoharic and Mohawk, where Palatinate and Swabian diligence created a great garden out of the wilderness. Fearing neither prison nor violence, Weiser travelled from New York to London to represent the rights of his German-American fellowmen before the King. The energy of his last years he devoted to Germanism in Pennsylvania, where he died, well advanced in years and highly honored in the German Berks district.

    Worthy of his father was Weiser's son, Konrad, born in Swabia. He was not as strong a man as his father, but finer and well-groomed, being the most profound and honest judge of Indiana....

    The true German blood of these descendants of South German immigrants flowed during the American War for Independence through the Palatinate hero, Herckheimer near Oriskany, and in many other battles.....

    Again the Swabians swore last Saturday evening when rain started to come down heavily. Yesterday morning bright and early the first Cannstadter public festival in Chicago began. The festival is ...

    German
    V A 1, I J, III H, III A, V A 2, II B 1 c 3
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- June 03, 1879
    [Muller's Halle]

    A ball held last night at the Muller's Halle which is being sponsored by the Luxemburg Widow and Orphan's Benevolent Society, was well attended. Everyone present was in a humorous mood. Mr. Gonner, the publisher of the Luxemberg Zeitung, delivered an impressive address, which was received with much cheer.

    A ball held last night at the Muller's Halle which is being sponsored by the Luxemburg Widow and Orphan's Benevolent Society, was well attended. Everyone present was in a humorous ...

    German
    II D 1, V A 1, III B 2, II B 2 g
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 01, 1879
    The Cannstatt Festival Immense Crowd at Ogden's Grove

    The Cannstatt festival, towards which the Swabians looked with eager anticipation, began yesterday. It started off to be a cloudy day, but it eventually turned out to be very pleasant and warm. The affair was very successful and no one regretted the rather long trip to Ogden's grove, since everyone present was in a most jovial mood.

    The farmers of the Neckar district who gather annually at Cannstatt on September 28, could not enjoy themselves any better than did yesterday's crowd. The festival proved particularly attractive, since our Germans here do not often find an occasion to revel in genuine Swabian surroundings.

    THE PAGEANT

    The crowd gathered during the early morning hours at Randolph, Desplaines, and 2Halsted Streets. Here Germans from Bavaria, Baden, Wuerttemberg, and other regions, appeared in their Sunday clothes; men, as well as women, were garbed in the costumes of Southern Germany. Appearance and conduct showed that young and old had resolved not to let any untoward incident mar the peaceful gathering. The committee on arrangements smoothed out the various details and the leader of the parade, Hummel, with his adjutants, did his share as the throng marched in rank and file. This section of Randolph Street looked--to give a European comparison--as though a prince, with his entourage, were approaching. The sidewalks were crowded. The saloons of the vicinity did a thriving business, since the Swabians, true to tradition, partook copiously of the sparkling amber brew.

    The final arrangements were completed shortly after eleven o'clock, and the parade started. The throng marched at a lively pace east along Randolph Street. Lieutenant Baus and a platoon of police formed the vanguard; Hummel followed with the knights, soldiers, and adjutants. The musicians rode on a nicely decorated wagon drawn by four horses. A lively march tune was played.

    3

    Messrs. Meinke, Metzdorf, and Dehne, trumpeters, rode horseback, leading a division of "mercenary soldiers" in seventeenth century costume; then followed Mr. Pohme as herald, escorted by seven knights with shields and spears.

    Next came the first float, representing the founding of the University of Tuebingen. Sitting on a throne, surrounded by four Capuchin monks, August Elser represented Count Eberhardt Der Rauschebart. The four monks were grouped around the ruler (apparently expecting a decision) and other allegorical figures appeared on a lower level. The float was festively decorated with garlands, wreaths, small trees, and flowers; suitable signs called attention to various historical incidents. Then followed a number of young men, in the garb of students, on horseback.

    The second float showed Emperor Friedrich Barbarossa in the Kyffhaeuser.

    David Bayha portrayed the part of Barbarossa sitting by the table, and, though 4the blond beard had not grown through (nor around) that piece of marble furniture, his characterization was excellent. Dwarfs sat in various parts of the rocky cavern, as if listening to the cawing of the ravens. Surmounting the entire group stood Germania, holding a sword, a very attractive figure, splendidly characterized by Miss Adolphine Hesse. The young lady (attired as the allegorical figure is usually presented, with long, flowing hair) looked very attractive, and bore up well, despite the merciless sun.

    After Barbarossa came a large number of crusaders and shield bearers.

    The third allegorical picture, Schiller's "Glocke," was a masterly conception. On one side was shown the molder and his wife (Charles Heiss and Miss Emilie Stiefel), on the other side his daughter, (Miss Amelie Klett) in an attractive costume and her sweetheart (Charles Kellermann) in jerkin, plush pants, and narrow, high boots. Miss Lizzie Hooker and Miss Rosie Klett appeared on the same float, in the "Sunday togs" of women of the time of the Thirty Years' War The molders' helpers, Karl Roepke, W. and Emil Hechinger, and Peter Bergstein, 5also wore very picturesque costumes and proved convincing in their parts.

    The next allegorical presentation showed the four districts of Wuerttemberg. A rock--made of strips of oak bark--was mounted in the center of the float, and on each corner stood a figure representing one of the districts. In addition to the figure of the Neckar district, the Donau (Danube) district, presented by Miss Johanna Bohl, proved very effective. She wore a light-colored narrow garment which gradually widened out at the bottom; a tapering strip of blue on the light background suggested the broadening river.

    Then followed two additional floats; one represented a Swabian wedding, with the bride and groom returning from the church, and the other was a milk wagon, with milkman, wife, and two girls, all in native costume. Then came the rural mail carrier on horseback and a chapel on a steep mound, followed by sixty-four equestrians carrying flags on which were inscribed the names of the sixty-four districts of Wuerttemberg. Next came the wagon of the festival committee and representatives of the press, a large number of carriages, a butchers' wagon, and a farm wagon. 6All the vehicles were ornamented with flowers and garlands.

    We must also mention Franz Demmler, the Swabian "mayor," who appeared in official regalia, riding in a phaeton drawn by two black-and-white-speckled horses.

    All of the costumes were furnished by Mrs. Sophie Hagemann; they were a great credit to her.

    The entire pageant was about one mile in length, and moved somewhat too rapidly through the gayly ornamented streets, since the parade was delayed at the start. In many places bunting was suspended across the streets.

    The route was along Randolph Street, Clark Street, Chicago Avenue, Larrabee Street, Clybourn Avenue, Sedgwick Street, North Avenue, and from there to the grove.

    7

    People gathered at windows, doors, and sidewalks; even the streets were crowded. Shouts of approval were numerous. The bands played popular melodies. At one o'clock the throng reached the grove.

    AT THE GROVE

    As soon as the parade reached the festival grounds, the crowd broke ranks. At first there was only music. The people who were in the parade sought refreshment at the various booths, while the younger element danced. The shooting gallery, merry-go-round, and other amusement devices were in great demand. Old friends met again, and the waiters were quite busy carrying big steins of beer.

    The place was splendidly decorated. The festive pillar, the work of Architect August Bestler, brought universal admiration. Cedar branches and sheaves of grain formed an octagonal base on which was mounted a pillar of vegetables. Potatoes, tomatoes, radishes, carrots, and so forth, formed all kinds of scroll work and figures, while the words "Cannstatt" and "Chicago" appeared especially 8prominent. Four pilasters at the base were surmounted by a vase of grapes, apples, and other fruit. Nearly everybody who came to the festival grounds looked at the pillar and admired it.

    It may be appropriate to mention here that the festivities were complete, even to the proverbial Swabian snag. The committee had prepared a float which was to depict the historic seven Swabians with their lances. Through some mischance, the float remained at the livery on Chicago Avenue and so was not in the pageant. However, the matter will be taken care of, and the seven redoubtable Swabians will make their appearance at the festival today.

    The various bars at the grove showed all kinds of inscriptions of a folklore character. We shall mention just a few: At the wine counter, a canvas showed a rabbit walking upright and carrying a tray with wine, while seven Swabians, more or less timid, took hold of a single lance and prepared to attack the ferocious beast. On the other side of the wall, the seven Swabians are shown grouped about a table drinking, while the rabbit sits on top of the wine 9barrel. To the right appear the following verses:

    "You Swabian, you go ahead,

    You've got high boots on,

    The rabbit can't bite you.

    What a silly chap you are,

    Look once more, it's only

    Valentine who offers you a

    Glass of wine. So throw

    Away your lance and

    Let us dine."

    On the left side appeared this verse:

    "And peaceful, like real Swabians, They rest and enjoy Valentine's good wine....."

    10

    Similar inscriptions were present everywhere; they were too numerous to catalogue them all.

    At four o'clock, Joseph Schoeninger, president of the Swabian club, introduced the principal speaker, Hermann Siegel of Milwaukee.

    SIEGEL'S SPEECH

    ...."I shall not resort to euphonious phrases.....Of late we have heard objections, in the press, to festivals which are of a nationalistic character, festivals which emphasize foreign origins. And while such antipathy is justified in certain instances, because of improper conduct which manifests itself occasionally, I cannot subscribe to the one-sided opinion which condemns these festivals in general. These festivals, in the main, will be German--although Swabians, Prussians, Saxonians....may make the arrangements....

    "The Swabians were the first to arrange these festivals, and other Germans 11followed....As long as these festivals are not on a profit basis, they are fully justified....We do not intend to give a demonstration showing that we are, first of all, Swabians, Bavarians, and so forth, and then Germans; at long last, German-Americans. I would never be affiliated with any group supporting such views.....

    "I despise nothing more than those Americanized Germans who deny their origin, who profess to be ashamed of their great German language, and who adopt the vilest American characteristics. Such degenerate Germans make the worst citizens of this Republic, because they lack character. Their accumulated wealth and prominence do not provide moral fortitude to acquire the better traits of true Americans.....

    "The Cannstatt festival is being celebrated in America's larger cities, and has been for the last several years, and our festival today fully conforms to the high standards prevailing elsewhere. It is said that we Swabians are gruff and stubborn, but regardless of what we may stand accused of, we are a congenial, 12jovial lot....."

    The speaker was frequently interrupted by applause. Then Franz Demmler, secretary of the club, expressed thanks for the large attendance.....

    The singers of the Swabian Club and some members of the Fidelia, who were in the pageant, regaled the assembly with several nice songs during the afternoon.

    Speeches, singing, dancing, drinking, and meeting old friends rounded out a pleasant afternoon. It is estimated that at least twenty thousand people came to the festival.

    The members of the arrangements committee deserve the gratitude of all members as well as of the public in general. It is apparent that no effort was spared in making the festival a great success.

    The net receipts are to be used for a Schiller monument in Lincoln Park.

    13

    THE EVENING FESTIVITIES

    During the evening hours the crowd seemed even livelier than in the afternoon. Chinese lanterns and calcium lights--not to forget the soft light of the moon--served for illumination. Dance tunes were played almost incessantly. Both platforms were crowded, as were the neighborhood lawns.

    Many people wore Swabian costumes. Julius Wolf was dressed as a nobleman of the last century. Professor De Lafayette, magician, entertained the crowd in the afternoon, and won great acclaim.

    The evening fireworks lasted about two hours and were arranged by Professor R. A. O'Shea. Fire wheels, Roman candles, rockets in Union colors, and cannon shots did much to arouse a spirit of gaiety.

    TODAY

    Today will be of interest to children as well as older people. A Punch-and-Judy 14show, sack race, climbing rod, Swabian girls carrying water, and so forth, will be on the program. The seven Swabians who were overlooked yesterday will be present today. A prize is to be given to the two children dressed most nicely in Swabian fashion.

    Today, typical Swabian meals, sauerkraut and dumplings, will be served, as well as wine, beer, and other refreshments. Finally; the festival pillar, built of fruit, the "Pillar of Plenty," will be raided!

    The Cannstatt festival, towards which the Swabians looked with eager anticipation, began yesterday. It started off to be a cloudy day, but it eventually turned out to be very pleasant ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II C, III H, V A 1
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- September 01, 1879
    Das Cannstatter Volksfest.

    The National Festival of the"Cannstatter Society" had the appearance, as if all the Swabians had taken a holiday and come to this country to help celebrate; this means of course, that there was an enormous attendance.

    At the head of the festive procession was the Marshal of Festivities, Hummel, surrounded by a group of Knights and adjutants on phantastically decorated wagons. A number of allegoric pictures, depicting the erection of the University of Jubinger by Count Eberhardt, Friedrich Barbarossa in the Kyffhauser, a picture from Schiller's Glocke, a Swabian marriage and the return from church, 64 riders, representing Wurttemberg's 64 districts, and many others of interest. The speaker, Mr. Hermann Sigel, of Milwaukee, remarked: "With all due respect to our friends and comrades in the battle for the object of our desire, only thus can we conquer, what threatens us all, that is:hypocrisy, enslavement, etc. It may seem strange, to mention all this in a festive speech, 2but politics are so interwoven with our existence, that it would be natural at gatherings like this, when we Germans would like to frolic to ask the question, whether we have any reason to be proud of our existence? Yes, we do, as long as faith and fraternity are uniting us. Hail to the German brotherhood!"

    The speaker was greatly acclaimed.

    The National Festival of the"Cannstatter Society" had the appearance, as if all the Swabians had taken a holiday and come to this country to help celebrate; this means of course, ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, III B 2, III H, V A 1
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 13, 1880
    [Low-German Sick Benefit Society]

    A cheerful ball was held last Sunday in Albert Lorenz Vokshall on Cornell St. The Society had made a lodge for people who neither could nor would join lodges already in operation; hence this Lodge was to help such persons. The party was very interesting and entertained by Fritz Reuter Grote and Zumbuch--Comrade Ed Cook made short speech in his mother tongue.

    Later on all the young people enjoyed themselves by dancing, to tunes of a very fine orchestra.

    A cheerful ball was held last Sunday in Albert Lorenz Vokshall on Cornell St. The Society had made a lodge for people who neither could nor would join lodges already ...

    German
    II D 1, V A 1, III B 2