The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 19, 1861
    Resolutions of Chicago Turngemeinde

    In the meeting which the Chicago Turngemeinde held on Thursday evening, the speaker proposed the following resolutions, which were accepted by the members:

    Whereas, Rebellion and treachery against the Union and against all law and order have boldly arisen, and

    Whereas, It is the duty of every true and loyal citizen to arm himself and defend the Union against internal or external enemies, and

    Whereas, A German company of soldiers in Charleston voluntarily offered to fight against the Union and for slavery, and thereby caused us to hang our heads in shame; therefore be it

    Resolved, That we, American citizens of German descent, shall remove this stain from our honorable name as well as we can, and that we therefore intend to form 2a free, independent rifle company, and are willing, if it should become necessary, to defend the Union with our lives and our property, and to fight against the expansion of slavery;

    That a committee consisting of three members be elected to find out where and how our society may obtain weapons free of charge, since we are financially unable to purchase them;

    That our secretary be hereby ordered to invite all the Turnvereine in the state to take similar action, and to at least arm themselves and be ready to join other military organizations in case their membership is too small to form an independent company;

    That these resolutions be published in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, The Tribune, Democrat, and The Post.

    David Huth, First Speaker,

    Charles Lotz, Secretary.

    In the meeting which the Chicago Turngemeinde held on Thursday evening, the speaker proposed the following resolutions, which were accepted by the members: Whereas, Rebellion and treachery against the Union ...

    German
    III B 2, I J, I G, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 29, 1861
    Chicago Turngemeinde Form Militia (Editorial)

    Under the name of Union Cadets, a number of members of the local Turngemeinde have formed a militia which will be a part of the Sixtieth Regiment. Forty men have already signed. This evening another meeting will be held at Kinzie Hall, and final organization will be effected, officers will be elected, etc. All young men who desire to join the company are requested to be present at this meeting.

    We heartily indorse this military movement and hope that in maneuvering and vaulting the German Union Cadets will eventually be superior to the well-known Zouave Cadets. Of course such activity requires more endurance than that which the "Sunday" and "holiday" militia displayed. Fortunately the latter have just about ceased to exist, and their arms, which have been stored in the basement of the Court House, are a memento mori in a two-fold 2sense of the expression.

    Under the name of Union Cadets, a number of members of the local Turngemeinde have formed a militia which will be a part of the Sixtieth Regiment. Forty men have ...

    German
    III B 2, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 05, 1861
    German Companies in Camp (Editorial)

    Various rumors have been spread concerning the situation of German companies. We advise our fellow citizens to be very careful about accepting reports that German companies are badly treated or disbanded. These rumors are seldom reliable, and it is much wiser to believe the statements of honest members of the companies themselves, and form one's opinion on the basis of what they have to say. Captain Schambeck visited our office and gave us an oral report on conditions, and we have received information through the mail from good honest Captain Lippert, who is at Camp Yates, and also from our friend Eduard Bornemann, ensign in the Turner Company.

    All the German companies from Chicago, which are in Camp Cairo and Camp Springfield, have been accepted for service and assigned to regiments.

    2

    These companies are:

    At Camp Cairo (Turner) Union Cadets, Captain Kowalt Lincoln Rifles, Captain Mihaloz

    At Camp Yates

    Union Rifles, Number 1, Captain Lippert

    Union Rifles, Number 2, Captain Iten

    Washington Light Cavalry, Captain Schambeck

    Washington Light Infantry, Captain Mattern

    The troops are in good humor and are well cared for; as a rule enrollment into active service puts an end to any complaints, and everybody is satisfied. Captain Schambeck, who brought us this information, says that these conditions 3are a result of the ceaseless efforts of Lieutenant Governor Hoffmann. It will be interesting to the relatives of the Chicagoans who are in camp to know that Captain Schambeck will be at Hottinger and Kastler's, on Randolph Street, today from 9 to 12 A. M. and from 1 to 3 P. M., and again tomorrow, from 9 to 12 A. M., to give anyone wishing for reliable news a true account of conditions in his camp.

    Genuine Turners

    The Union Cadets are brave boys; they do not believe in half-way methods. Not only did they ask for the honor of filling the most dangerous positions in Camp Cairo; not only did they drill so diligently and energetically that they are now able to compete with the crack Zouave Company; but they have also reorganized their Turnverein in camp, Officers elected are: A. Erbe, First Speaker; C. Bornemann, Secretary; horizontal bars were erected, and 4so "Kinzie Hall" was transferred to Camp Cairo. That's the way, boys! Good luck to you!

    Various rumors have been spread concerning the situation of German companies. We advise our fellow citizens to be very careful about accepting reports that German companies are badly treated or ...

    German
    III D, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 07, 1861
    The Meeting at the German House (Editorial)

    A number of Germans of this city held a meeting at the German House last Sunday. Mr. C. Butz was elected chairman and Mr. E. Seckel secretary. Although the meeting was not very well attended, a laudable zeal was displayed by the assembly, and great progress was made in matter pertaining to the support of the families of the volunteers who have left home to defend the Union and uphold our laws against anarchy and rebellion. Mr. D. Kletz, second lieutenant of the Union Rifle Company (composed of Germans of Chicago), who happened to be here on furlough, reported on conditions in Camp Springfield. He said that food was ample, but that complaints were made in regard to two matters: a lack of shirts and shoes was causing considerable dissatisfaction; furthermore, members of this company were troubled by the thought that their loved ones at home would not be cared for. From the interesting report which Mr. Eschenburg, a member of the Central Committee, rendered later it was noted that the cause for the first complaint, which was justified, had been removed, since a shipment of 2shoes and woolen shirts consigned to the aforementioned company had gone forward last Friday. In regard to the support of the families of soldiers in camp, Mr. Eschenburg informed the assembly that it had been resolved to give each mother who has two children in the service $3.00 per week and that this sum is to be decreased or increased according to circumstances. He also pointed out that the Central Committee spends thousands of dollars for this and other purposes, and that it was necessary to devise some way of furnishing the Committee with more funds. After a long debate, it was decided to propose, through the German member of the Committee, that the Committee appoint three persons in each ward to solicit subscriptions for monthly contributions to be paid during the duration of the war, and to be delivered to the Committee when collected. We hope that our German fellow citizens, especially those who have been blessed with much of this world's goods, will not fail to show their patriotism by generous subscriptions. But also the ones who are not rich can, and should, place their mite on the altar of the Fatherland and remember that the proverb, "many grains make a pile", is still true.

    A number of Germans of this city held a meeting at the German House last Sunday. Mr. C. Butz was elected chairman and Mr. E. Seckel secretary. Although the meeting ...

    German
    III D, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 07, 1861
    The Germans (Editorial)

    In the border states, even in Texas and the extreme Southern states, all the Germans are true Americans; all are loyal to our Government.

    In Baltimore, Maryland, the Germans, one and all, are for the Union. The Germans in this city were the ones who hauled down the flag of the Secession, and everywhere in those parts of the city which are inhabited chiefly by Germans, the flag of the Union is proudly and boldly displayed.

    In St. Louis, the German element holds the Secessionists in complete check and the authorities of that city did not hesitate to furnish these Teutons with arms taken from the arsenal of the United States. Three thousand of these Germans enlisted under The Star-Spangled Banner, ready to defend the Union, the Constitution, liberty and justice against any enemy. Had it not been for these Germans, the State of Missouri would have proclaimed secession long ago.

    2

    Many of the volunteers who hail from our city are German. A number of companies are "all-German," and they were the first to be ready for combat. There are quite a few Germans in other companies also.

    The German hates the flag of the rebels, and this hate knows no bounds, he will never fight under the flag of secessonists; on the contrary, he will take up arms against it, even when confronted by superior forces.

    The hatred of the German race toward everything that savors of slavery is deadly. No doubt it emanates from the fact that the Germans are primarily a working people, who are very practical in everything they undertake, and that they have implicit trust in the possibility that some day humanity may be entirely freed from despotism, whether it be political, religious, or economic.

    Thank God that we have this element among us during these perilous times, when the black cohorts of slavery have arisen to fight against the advocates of those human rights, in defense of which all Christendom is ready to take up arms at this very moment.

    In the border states, even in Texas and the extreme Southern states, all the Germans are true Americans; all are loyal to our Government. In Baltimore, Maryland, the Germans, one ...

    German
    III D, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 01, 1861
    Schambeck's Company (Editorial)

    The Cincinnati Yolksfreund reports: "About six o'clock last evening Schambeck's Company arrived here from Chicago, via the Cincinnati and Chicago Air-Line Railroad, leaving the train at the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railroad depot, Since the saddles and baggage of this stately cavalry contingent had been immediately transferred and sent on, the travellers were forced to lead their horses through the streets. Captain Schambeck had telegraphed to the local United States Quartermaster, requesting that official to make the necessary arrangements to care for the soldiers and their mounts. The Quartermaster ordered that the horses be taken to Benjamin Jennifer's Livery Stables, at the corner of 12th and Walnut Streets.

    There the horses were fed and bedded, but neither meals nor sleeping quarters were supplied for the men. Some goodhearted and patriotic citizens saw the 2men standing on street corners, heard their bitter complaints about the ill treatment of the Government, and took some of them to the Turnhalle, and others to nearby halls, where the tired troopers received meals and then were lodged in boarding houses. So local citizens had to care for United States soldiers, while it is the duty of the United States' Quartermaster to provide for them. This is just another example of the deplorable and harmful negligence and disorder which prevails in all branches of our war administration.

    Schambeck's Company consists of 102 members, all Chicago Germans who have seen service in the Old Country. They are strong, lanky men, and have all the necessary requisites to effective service in the cavalry of our army.

    The Cincinnati Yolksfreund reports: "About six o'clock last evening Schambeck's Company arrived here from Chicago, via the Cincinnati and Chicago Air-Line Railroad, leaving the train at the Cincinnati, Hamilton and ...

    German
    III D, IV, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 09, 1861
    Home Guard (Editorial)

    The President's message gives assurance that the War against the Southern Rebels will be carried on vigorously. A call for four hundred thousand men has been issued, and they will be enrolled by fall.

    However, war takes its toll of human lives, and soon the ranks of our brave Union soldiers will be thinned. Therefore, the training of a general reserve, or home guard is of the utmost importance. It is well known that the reserves of Missouri have already rendered excellent services.

    Everyone whose financial condition does not permit him to go to battle should endeavor to acquire at least some military training at home. And the home guard should be composed not only of married men and elderly men, but also of young unmarried men who have remained at home.

    2

    We know that every army needs reserves from time to time, and we are aware of how very important it is that the replacement troops have a knowledge of at least the rudiments of military tactics. This is a fact which needs no further proof or explanation. We shall very likely receive pertinent military orders soon, since Senator Wilson's proposal for the establishment of a general national guard is now before the senior legislative body.

    Here in Chicago it appeared that the citizens, particularly those of German extraction, were to begin training a reserve or home guard when hostilities began; several companies were organized, and we hoped that a number sufficient to establish a regiment would soon enroll. But the ardor quickly waned, and now only a small remnant of a formerly large body remains. Still it is gratifying that even a small group desires to continue its activity, and to obtain further military knowledge. Although a full company exists no more, on the West Side a comparatively large part of Company Three still drills very diligently and conscientiously; and though Company One, on the North Side, was reduced from one hundred ten to about half that number, the Company will 3undoubtedly compensate, with increased efficiency for what it lost in numerical strength.

    Thus we see that many men take training seriously--in addition to exercising two evenings a week, they answer the call of the drum every Sunday, and it is only fair to say that they make good use of the little time that is at their disposal.

    Captain Eshenburg, an officer who received a thorough education at a Prussian military school, deserves credit for the splendid progress made by Company One. He has succeeded in instilling a liking for military matters in his men, as each and every one of them will testify. They presented him with a sword, July 4, in recognition of his honest and conscientious efforts. Mr. E. Pruessing, Second Officer of the Company, made the presentation and addressed a few well chosen words to the leader. The spirit of this Company and the fine relation existing between the men and their officers is highly pleasing, indeed.

    Finally, we most urgently request that all German men of Chicago who do not 4intend to or cannot enlist in the fighting forces immediately, join the reserves, at least, and devote a few hours of every week to military training. Men who live on the North Side may report at the headquarters of Company One in the German House, and residents of the West Side at West Market Hall.

    The President's message gives assurance that the War against the Southern Rebels will be carried on vigorously. A call for four hundred thousand men has been issued, and they will ...

    German
    I G, IV, I J, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 14, 1861
    Thielemann's Company

    Another contingent of cavalry will leave Chicago for the battlefield--a troop just as brave as Schambeck's boys. Although this company, which consists chiefly of experienced cavalrymen, was accepted for service July 2, it must support itself until it has been sworn for service. However, these men have no means of obtaining a living, since they have ceased working. Therefore, the German public, every patriotic citizen of German extraction, is requested to do his share toward the maintenance of these brave men. A "musical evening" has been arranged tonight at North's Theatre for the benefit of Cavalry Company Number Two, of which Captain Thielemann is the leader. We advise that all Germans read the program which appears in the respective advertisement. It offers plenty of entertainment, and the fact that the purpose is a patriotic one should make it doubly enjoyable.

    Another contingent of cavalry will leave Chicago for the battlefield--a troop just as brave as Schambeck's boys. Although this company, which consists chiefly of experienced cavalrymen, was accepted for service ...

    German
    III D, I J, I G, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 17, 1861
    German Rifle Company

    Headquarters of German Rifle Company,

    August 17, 1861.

    Dear Fellow Citizens: Today we are opening a recruiting station to organize an infantry company of riflemen which will be taken into active service immediately. We are depending not only on our comrades of the Reserve Rifle Company, many of whom would rather march against the enemy than serve in the ranks of Home Guards, to report to us, but also on all other patriotic citizens who are able to bear arms and who wish to attach themselves to a good rifle company.

    Further information may be had at the recruiting station located in Newberry's block on North Wells Street.

    H. Eschenburg,

    A. Borcherdt,

    A. Block.

    2

    (Editor's note: Mr. H. Eschenburg has been captain of the North Side Home Guards. He has his company well organized and has given them an excellent military training. He is a person in whom everyone who wishes to go to war for the Union may have the utmost confidence. We do not doubt in the least that this new company will be an excellent one. Ho! then, all you who have hesitated before, our country needs defenders!)

    Headquarters of German Rifle Company, August 17, 1861. Dear Fellow Citizens: Today we are opening a recruiting station to organize an infantry company of riflemen which will be taken into ...

    German
    I J, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 26, 1861
    The American Turnerbund and the War. (Editorial)

    Although the North American Turnerbund is dead, it was never more alive than it is now. As an entity it has just about entered the final stage of decay; yet its component parts have developed strength and energy as never before, and the strength and energy displayed by the individual parts of the Bund are guarantees that later a larger and stronger national society will be established.

    Nobody need grieve about the dissolution of the defunct Turnerbund, for it had outlived its usefulness and was marked for destruction as long as five years ago. At that time a schism in its ranks wrought damage that was not repaired, despite all efforts of S. R. Wiesner, editor of Turnzeitung, the Society's official organ, to instill new life into the national association. 2When the Turnzeitung collapsed as a result of the April riots in Baltimore, the last hour of the North American Turnerbuad had come.

    It had accomplished much good during the time of its existence, before, as well as after the schism; it had introduced as a permanent branch of education--a branch of which Americans physical education were unaware--not only into German-American circles but those of Anglo-Americans as well. Through the scientific lectures of Schuenemann-Pott, Stallo, and Solger, the Bund had engendered and fostered much mental activity among many of our German-American youths; it had established several good elementary and evening schools, or had caused their established; it had worked hand in hand with singing societies to make a place for German male choruses in America. In political battles it had served as the vanguard of the German-American element for some time; for after having taken a firm stand (through the adoption of the "Buffalo" platform in the fall of 1855) for the principles of the Republican party, which had been organized but a few years before, it soon widened this platform, which originally was directed against the further spreading of slavery, by making 3a strong attack on slavery itself (sic); Through the establishment of rifle clubs the Bund had provided military training for some of its members, and thereby, as we shall see, it had laid the foundation for reorganization. [Translator's note: The author is in error if he means to create the impression that this was the first evidence of the anti-slavery attitude of Americans of German descent. Long before the birth of the Republican party, in fact, nearly a hundred years before the American Declaration of Independence was signed in 1688, German Menonites in Germantown, Pennsylvania, under the leadership of their pastor, the Reverend Daniel Pastorius, publicly protested against slavery as an institution.]

    Indeed, the Turnerbund had a long and honorable existence, but owing to indifference among the members its usefulness was impaired, and its services dwindled more and more. It would require too much time and space to trace all the causes of this indifference; we will mention briefly one of the chief causes, namely, the purely material tendencies which became especially noticeable after Turner saloons were opened in many cities. At that time individual 4Turner organizations actually were nothing but saloonkeepers' and beer speculators' associations; in some instances vain and idle formalism supplanted noble endearers and estranged many older members who had rendered valuable services and were the pillars of the organization.

    However, these bad symptoms began to vanish when the great battle against The Southern Rebels was begun....

    The Turner will see to it that history will relate and praise them for many more and much greater deeds. Even now they merit the distinction of having furnished proportionately more men for the army of the Union than any other association in the United States. Though they were snubbed, ridiculed, and neglected, their ardor for combat did not wave; moreover it grew when difficulties increased, and since Siegel and Willich issued their first warnings, Turner fighters have doubled their efforts.

    It is to be deplored that all Turners serving in the various regiments of 5the Union Army cannot be united into one large Turner corps, or perhaps into two; one could be placed under the command of Siegel, and the other under Willich, for they are both Turners. Perhaps it is better that they are distributed among the various corps, and that, for instance, the Turner rifle men of Cincinnati are operating in the mountains of West Virginia, the Turner rifle men of the State of New York are located at Fort Monroe, those of Philadelphia are in the vicinity of Alexandria, and some Turner of Chicago are serving in the southeastern part of Missouri. Their military efficiency and, we may add, their staunchness, zeal, and endeavor, which have been renewed and increased on the field of battle, and their desire to fight a war for the liberation of men from the bonds of slavery rather than a political war, have been a source of strength and inspiration for the various army corps, especially for the Germans troops. And that Turner are able to operate as larger units is evinced by the services of the New York Turner Regiment.

    Just as German Turners of the North, though they are spread over every part 6of the theatre of war, form in spirit one great brotherhood in arms, so they will form one great association, a regenerated and purified Turnerbund. The best and ablest German men will gladly join that Bund; for it will be their task, not only to resume the noble and elevating work of the old Turnerbund, but also to counteract the moral and physical debility which will follow in the wake of this great struggle, to prevent the atrophy of the good results of this war, and above all, to protect the good which Americans of German descent will reap from the victory of the North against the envy and wiles of nativism.

    Although the North American Turnerbund is dead, it was never more alive than it is now. As an entity it has just about entered the final stage of decay; yet ...

    German
    II B 3, I G, I J, III D, III B 2