The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 11, 1861
    Mass Meeting at North Market Hall

    Last evening, one of Chicago's largest and most enthusiastic gatherings of German-American citizens assembled in North Market Hall, and the spacious room was crowded to overflowing. A. C. Hesing called the meeting to order; John H. Muehlke was elected chairman, and Eduard Seckel was elected secretary. Caspar Butz was the first speaker, and after making a stirring address, he moved that a committee of five be appointed by the chair to draft resolutions. The chairman appointed C. Butz, H. Eschenburg, H. H. Bruns, Joseph Brosch, and L. Lamperts as members of the committee. This committee retired and later, through the chairman, C. Butz, it reported the following resolutions which were adopted amid thunderous applause.

    "In view of the great crisis in our national affairs, when the fate of the Republic trembles in the balance, a mass meeting composed chiefly of German-American citizens was held at North Market Hall in Chicago, and adopted the following resolutions:

    2

    1) "That, while disclaiming every intention to resuscitate old and obsolete issues, and pledging to the Government of our choice our undivided support in the prosecution of the war against the black monster of secession, nevertheless, we, as free citizens of this Republic, claim our rights to voice our sentiments and opinions in regard to the carrying on of the war and the measures of this administration.

    2) "That, as every day it becomes more evident that this war is a struggle for life and death between two principles hostile to each other since the day of creation, we warn and remind the Government that the triumph of liberty can be final and lasting only if slavery is abolished.

    3) "That, in the Administration's measures for the suppression of the insurrection we have thus far seen nothing but indecision and vacillation, a desire to shirk the true issues of the contest and to decline a responsibility which the rulers of our great nation are expected to assume.

    3

    4) "That, in the recent proclamation of General Fremont, which unfortunately, was mutilated by order of the President, we saw a harbinger of better days, and the surest means of bringing this war to a speedy close.

    5) "That, when, as if it were planned to add insult to injury, the idol of the Western Army, the man who created order in chaos, General John C. Fremont, was removed from his command just as he was about to reap the fruit of his efforts, we were loathe to believe the incredible news, and had to bow our heads in silence before a procedure so unparalleled in history and so detrimental to the best interests of our country.

    6) "That, after having carefully sifted the accusations made against General Fremont, we have found nothing but an ex parte statement of his enemies, not supported by the truth, devoid in many instances of even the semblance of truth, containing many long refuted charges, and bearing in every word the stamp of the accusers malignity.

    4

    7) "That, in our opinion, even if the charges against General Fremont had been proved by unquestionable evidence, the Government might have found means of correcting them other than by the removal of the leader who never was heard in self-defense, and whose only crime, in the opinion of the people, is that he obstructs the ambitions of other men.

    8) "That, since it has removed General Fremont, we have lost all confidence in the Administration, and that the people will hold our authorities responsible for the evil consequences resulting from their acts, and particularly from this most injudicious and unjust measure.

    9) "That, while thus expressing our grievances, we solemnly declare our unalterable devotion to our adopted country and to the glorious flag of freedom under the folds of which we found a new home. The citizens by adoption have already shown their zeal for the cause of liberty; but for liberty only, not for the schemes and compromises of designing politicians are they ready to fight to the bitter end, and for this, in the language of our forefathers, 5they 'pledge their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor'.

    10) "That, we assure General Fremont of our unchanging love and admiration, and of our most sincere thanks for an approbation of the immortal services he rendered to the cause of science and the cause of his country, for the great energy and the self-sacrificing patriotism, with which he created the Army of the West, for the great human principles of his proclamation of emancipation, for the vigor and rapidity with which he, in spite of all the obstacles thrown in his way by the authorities at Washington, marched from St. Louis to Springfield, and cleared the state from the hordes of Rebels, and for the self-denying and truly republican civic spirit in which he received the blow aimed at him by the President."

    Mr. Lamperts offered a resolution censuring the Chicago Tribune for its stand on the Fremont controversy, but on motion of Mr. N. Eisendrath the motion was tabled; the reason offered for the rejecture being that it would be beneath the dignity of those assembled to pay any attention to such a small matter as the 6above-named paper, after having declared their views on such important and momentous matters.

    It was moved to send a copy of the resolutions to President Lincoln through our representative in Congress, Honorable I. N. Arnold, but since a number of speakers remarked that Mr. Arnold was not a warm friend of General Hunter, it was considered unwise to request the services of Mr. Arnold in this matter.

    While the committee on resolutions was out, Sheriff Hesing, William Rapp, and T. Hielscher made truly eloquent speeches, and the meeting adjourned amid loud cheers for John C. Fremont, the next president of the United States.

    Last evening, one of Chicago's largest and most enthusiastic gatherings of German-American citizens assembled in North Market Hall, and the spacious room was crowded to overflowing. A. C. Hesing called ...

    German
    I J, IV, I G, III B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 10, 1862
    The Rights of Immigrants at the Constiutional Convention (Editorial)

    During the last campaign we insisted that the Germans be represented in the Constitutional Convention of the State of Illinois; we emphasized that our need for recognition was the only reason for our recommendation for a suitable candidate to be present at the meeting at Kingsbury Hall, and we stated that we were not in the least interested in conferring a well-paying county office to a mere political job chaser. It was our intention to protect our rights to vote, for a change in the Constitution might involve a restriction or an expansion of this right. And we note from the official report on the proceedings of the Convention (January 29) that our German delegate, Mr. John Henry Muehlke, made the following proposal, which was adopted:

    Resolved, That the Committee on Elections and Franchise consider the feasibility of granting the right to vote to all foreign-born residents of this state who volunteered to serve in the army or navy during the present Rebellion and who 2have been honorably discharged, or who will serve in the armed forces of the Union during this War and receive an honorable dismissal, if such persons are not disqualified for any reason save that they are not citizens of the United States.

    From the very beginning of the campaign we did not hesitate to give Mr. Muehlke our full support; and as far as we have been able to follow his activity to date, we do not doubt that not only the Germans of Chicago, but also of the whole state will look upon their choice with great satisfaction.

    During the last campaign we insisted that the Germans be represented in the Constitutional Convention of the State of Illinois; we emphasized that our need for recognition was the only ...

    German
    I J, IV, I F 3, III B 1, III B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 09, 1870
    Delegates of German Societies of Chicago Hold Meeting

    The second meeting of delegates of German societies met last evening in Germania Hall which is located in Uhlich's Block.

    Mr. Claussenius presided and Mr. C. Wenborne acted as secretary. Unfortunately the attendance at this second meeting was also very sparse. Besides the societies which sent delegates to the first meeting, the Orpheus Chorus and the Order of Red Men were represented in this meeting, the former by Mr. Wilhelm Richter, and the latter by Mr. C. Bierbrauer.

    After the chairman had made a few brief remarks regarding his appeal and the meeting that was held in Farwell Hall, Mr. Degenhardt (sic) pointed out that the purpose of the meeting was perhaps misunderstood by some, that it had been left to the individual organizations to elect committees for the purpose 2of receiving donations, and that, in some instances, ignorance prevailed concerning the intended disposition of the money that is being collected.

    He said there were rumors as a result of which some people were under the impression that contributions would be used to purchase warships or to organize and equip a regiment of volunteers, and that such unfounded reports were greatly impairing the work of the various societies. He emphasized the fact that contributions would be used for benevolent purposes. He then proposed that the members present name the men whom their organizations had appointed to serve as delegates. The proposal was adopted unanimously. The following is a list of societies and their representatives: Chicago Turngemeinde: Peter Hand, Arthur Erbe, J. Kaufmann;

    Germania Turnverein: Charles Werkmeister, Wilhelm Potratz, Joseph Miehle;

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    Schleswig-Holsteinischer Verein: Mr. A. Braun, Mr. F. Hinrichs, Mr. P. Sacher, Mr. A. Westphal; Germania Maennerchor: Mr. H. Seiler, Mr. T. Thieme, Mr. P. Heine, Mr. A. Pemiger; Aurora Turnverein: Mr. A. Fuerstenberg, Mr. Charles Peters, Hamburger Club: Mr. S. Sommer, Mr. S. Gumprecht, Mr. A. Frank; Concordia Maennerchor: Mr. E. Schloesser, Mr. P. Schumann, Mr. S. Groscurth; German employees of the Union Hide and Leather Company: Christian Bartmann.

    An American who was present asked permission to speak; it was granted amid great applause. He stated that he could not speak in German and would have to address the assembly in his mother tongue. He declared that he felt called upon to express his sympathy and that of many other Americans; that they had not forgotten that many Germans fought for the cause of the Union in the Civil War, and had rendered very valuable services on the battlefield. He expressed his hope that the German flag would soon be waving from the towers of Paris! He was cheered enthusiastically.

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    On recommendation of Mr. Dietzsch and Mr. Lotz it was decided to again issue an invitation to all German societies and lodges, and thus to leave nothing undone in an attempt to acquire the participations of all Germans, especially the laggards.

    The chairman was authorized to call a special meeting if necessary. A regular meeting will be held next Monday.

    The second meeting of delegates of German societies met last evening in Germania Hall which is located in Uhlich's Block. Mr. Claussenius presided and Mr. C. Wenborne acted as secretary. ...

    German
    III B 4, III D, III B 2, II D 10
  • Chicago Times -- May 22, 1871
    The Baptist Home Mission Society.

    The thirty-ninth annual meeting of the American Home society was held at Farwell hall on Saturday.

    The Germans

    Mr. Goebelman spoke for the German population. He pointed out that there are five million Germans in this country who should have the gospel preached to them, as they will have much to do with the future destiny of the land. Their influence will become stronger every year. It is vain to whine about their Sabbath breaking proclivities, without doing something to meet them.

    They are intelligent, and should be directed in the proper direction. The majority are not infidels, but might be called indifferentists. The only way to reach them is to preach to them through their own language. The emergency should be met by the enlargement of the German branch of the home mission.

    The thirty-ninth annual meeting of the American Home society was held at Farwell hall on Saturday. The Germans Mr. Goebelman spoke for the German population. He pointed out that there ...

    German
    III C, III B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 04, 1871
    [The German Patriotic Aid Society]

    The Executive Committee of the German Patriotic Aid Society decided in its last meeting to bring its existence to a close by giving a short report on its past activities to the German citizens of Chicago.

    The German mass meeting on July 17, 1870, in the Turn Hall on the North Side, elected a Finance Committee to collect funds in the City of Chicago for the victims of the Franco-Prussian war. The list of members of this committee has undergone frequent changes. The committee has found it very difficult to secure members who-quite aside from collecting money - would attend its meetings with some punctuality and regularity. The committee consists now, at the moment of its dissolution, of the following gentlemen: H. Greenbaum, G. Schneider, C. Butz, E. Dietzsch, W. A. Hettich, Y. Rosenthal, P. Hand, G. Snydacker, C. Degenhardt, A. Erbe, F. Annecke, E. Prusing, A. Seuberth, A. Blum, T. Rutishauser, H. Lieb, and Y. Beiersdorf.

    By and large, the oft-repeated calls to the societies and lodges (especially to the latter) have met with but small success. Some of the Turn and singing societies have collected not quite inconsiderable sums (Chicago Turn Community $250, Schleswig-Holstein Association $132, Salem Community $130, 2Employees of Western Banknote and Lithographing Company $118, Veterans' Club of the 24th Illinois Regiment $100, etc), by far the most, however, was contributed through the Fair which the German women arranged ($17,335) and, next, through the picnic conducted by the Musicians Union ($2,304).

    After the first two weeks of its existence the Finance Committee constituted itself as Executive Committee and undertook new functions: Correspondence at home as well as with Germany; agitation in the villages and small towns; information to the press in the German interest; protest against the actions of our ambassador, Washburn, in Paris; organization of meetings, and the distributing and dispatching of collected funds, etc.

    The Executive Committee of the German Patriotic Aid Association of New York called a convention of all German Patriotic Aid Associations of the United States, to Chicago on August 18, 1870. The convention took place, but its resolutions were not accepted by the Chicago G. P. Aid Association, which retained its independence, and sent the money it collected directly to Germany. Altogether $29,554 were collected in Chicago; $10,645 in places outside Chicago; slightly more than $40,000 were expedited to Germany.

    The Executive Committee of the German Patriotic Aid Society decided in its last meeting to bring its existence to a close by giving a short report on its past activities ...

    German
    III B 2, IV, III B 4, V A 1, II D 10
  • Chicago Times -- September 19, 1874
    German Hardshells

    The German Baptist Union Association, composed of German Baptist churches of the United States and Canada, is holding a convention in the church, corner of Huron and Bickerdike streets. The Association meets once in three years to deliberate on the affairs of the denomination.

    The German department of the Rochester Theological Seminary, and the German Baptist Publishing House, at Cleveland, O., will receive a large share of attention during the session, as well as various other enterprises of a denominational character. The convention contains delegates from Canada East and Canada West, and from the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. The exercises were opened by religious services and a sermon by Rev. G. A. Schulte.

    The convention organized for business by electing Rev. G. A. Schulte moderator, and Prof. J. Gimmel, of Brooklyn, and Rev. P. Ritter, of 2Cincinnati, as secretaries.

    Prof. O. Rauschenbush, of the German department of the Rochester Theological Seminary, made an address showing the department to be in a propserous condition.

    Twenty-two young men received instuction at the institution this year. A building for the accomodation of the students in the way of dormitories and dining-rooms was needed, and a recommendation was made for the purchase of such a building in Rochester.

    Yesterday morning the committee appointed to examine and report on the course of study, recommended that the course be extended to four years, and that the study of the English branches be made obligatory during the first two years. The report was adopted after considerable discussion, and it was resolved that all German beneficiary students be required to give a pledge in writing binding them to return the amount received as a benefit, in case they ever left the ministry for any other reason than sickness.

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    The beneficiary students must also be recommended and approved by the church association, and by the educational committee.

    The afternoon was occupied with the discussion of a set of resolutions, to the effect that the Association should purchase the building known as the Tracy Female Institute, located at Rochester, to be used for dormitories and dining-rooms by the German students attending the seminary.

    Nearly every member had something to say on the subject, and after long and tedious discussion it was decided to make the purchase, by a vote of 48 to 19.

    The session will be continued this morning.

    The German Baptist Union Association, composed of German Baptist churches of the United States and Canada, is holding a convention in the church, corner of Huron and Bickerdike streets. The ...

    German
    III C, III B 4
  • Hejmdal -- January 16, 1875
    [Scandinavian Societies Hold Convention] (Summary)

    The Scandinavian convention was held last Monday in the Workmen's Hall at Halsted and Ridgely Streets,for all the members of the eight societies. The Hall was decorated very artistically with American, Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian flags. The president of the convention, Jacob Nielsen, wished every one welcome and explained the convention's purpose, which is to work for co-operation between the Scandinavian societies.

    After the banquet was over, Henry L. Hertz spoke on the major problem on the agenda of the convention; there are fifty thousand Scandinavians in Chicago, one eighth of the city's population. Certainly it is big enough to take care of its own needy countrymen.

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    Captain Lange spoke on the necessity of erecting a large building for all the different Scandinavian societies so that they could meet under the one roof. This plan has been tried and has failed, but let us try again.

    The Scandinavian convention was held last Monday in the Workmen's Hall at Halsted and Ridgely Streets,for all the members of the eight societies. The Hall was decorated very artistically with ...

    Danish
    III B 4, III B 4, III B 4, IV, I C, II D 10
  • [Association documents] -- May 11, 1876
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    The chairman presented a communication which he had received from Lewis May of the committee appointed by New York congregations for the purpose of calling a convention of representatives of the various kindred institutions, to take place in the City of New York on the 24th of May, with the view of establishing a College of Hebrew learning.

    The chairman presented a communication which he had received from Lewis May of the committee appointed by New York congregations for the purpose of calling a convention of representatives of ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, I A 1 a
  • [Association documents] -- May 18, 1876
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    The subject of the proposed N. Y. convention on the 24th following, was fully discussed by the Rev. Dr. Kohler, who was present by invitation and the members present, and, it was finally unanimously resolved, that the congregation should be represented.

    The subject of the proposed N. Y. convention on the 24th following, was fully discussed by the Rev. Dr. Kohler, who was present by invitation and the members present, and, ...

    Jewish
    III B 4
  • Chicago Tribune -- October 12, 1877
    Polish Patriots Second Day of the Convention

    The second day's session of the fifth annual Convention of the Polish Catholic Union of the United States was held yesterday at the corner of Noble and Bradley streets. There were some twenty societies represented by delegates. The Rev. Father L. Moczygemba, of Jeffersonville, Ind., presided, John Barzynski, secretary.

    A committee of three, composed of P. Kiolbassa, the Rev. Kosloski, of La Salle, and the Rev. Joseph Dombrowski, was appointed for the purpose of finding a suitable place in which to establish a Polish Orphan Asylum, and to raise funds among the Polish Societies through the country for that purpose.

    The second day's session of the fifth annual Convention of the Polish Catholic Union of the United States was held yesterday at the corner of Noble and Bradley streets. There ...

    Polish
    III B 4, II D 4, III C