The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 19, 1861
    Resolutions of Chicago Turngemeinde

    In the meeting which the Chicago Turngemeinde held on Thursday evening, the speaker proposed the following resolutions, which were accepted by the members:

    Whereas, Rebellion and treachery against the Union and against all law and order have boldly arisen, and

    Whereas, It is the duty of every true and loyal citizen to arm himself and defend the Union against internal or external enemies, and

    Whereas, A German company of soldiers in Charleston voluntarily offered to fight against the Union and for slavery, and thereby caused us to hang our heads in shame; therefore be it

    Resolved, That we, American citizens of German descent, shall remove this stain from our honorable name as well as we can, and that we therefore intend to form 2a free, independent rifle company, and are willing, if it should become necessary, to defend the Union with our lives and our property, and to fight against the expansion of slavery;

    That a committee consisting of three members be elected to find out where and how our society may obtain weapons free of charge, since we are financially unable to purchase them;

    That our secretary be hereby ordered to invite all the Turnvereine in the state to take similar action, and to at least arm themselves and be ready to join other military organizations in case their membership is too small to form an independent company;

    That these resolutions be published in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, The Tribune, Democrat, and The Post.

    David Huth, First Speaker,

    Charles Lotz, Secretary.

    In the meeting which the Chicago Turngemeinde held on Thursday evening, the speaker proposed the following resolutions, which were accepted by the members: Whereas, Rebellion and treachery against the Union ...

    German
    III B 2, I J, I G, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 29, 1861
    Chicago Turngemeinde Form Militia (Editorial)

    Under the name of Union Cadets, a number of members of the local Turngemeinde have formed a militia which will be a part of the Sixtieth Regiment. Forty men have already signed. This evening another meeting will be held at Kinzie Hall, and final organization will be effected, officers will be elected, etc. All young men who desire to join the company are requested to be present at this meeting.

    We heartily indorse this military movement and hope that in maneuvering and vaulting the German Union Cadets will eventually be superior to the well-known Zouave Cadets. Of course such activity requires more endurance than that which the "Sunday" and "holiday" militia displayed. Fortunately the latter have just about ceased to exist, and their arms, which have been stored in the basement of the Court House, are a memento mori in a two-fold 2sense of the expression.

    Under the name of Union Cadets, a number of members of the local Turngemeinde have formed a militia which will be a part of the Sixtieth Regiment. Forty men have ...

    German
    III B 2, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 11, 1861
    Annual Report of the Treasurer of the German Society of Chicago

    Receipts

    Balance in Treasury on April 9th, 1860 $249.92
    Dues collected 227.89
    Donations received 49.25
    Proceeds from fair and ball 670.03
    Interest on loans 17.25
    Payment on note 3.00
    Payment of loan 4.50
    Sale of empty barrels 1.30
    Total $1,223.14

    Disbursements

    Donations to charitable purposes, Agent's salary, and miscellaneous expenses

    2
    $635.16
    Balance on April 6th, 1861 587.98

    The latter sum, together with a note for $2.50 is in the hands of the treasurer.

    Ernst Kirchner

    Receipts <table> <tr> <td>Balance in Treasury on April 9th, 1860</td> <td>$249.92</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Dues collected</td> <td>227.89</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Donations received</td> <td>49.25</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Proceeds from fair and ball</td> <td>670.03</td> </tr> ...

    German
    III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 07, 1861
    Meeting of the German Ladies' Society

    The German Ladies' Society, which was organized for the purpose of furnishing lint, bandages and other materials for dressing wounds, and, above all, the money necessary to buy them, held a meeting [yesterday] at the German House. The attendance was not proportionate to the seriousness which German ladies and girls should show during times of great danger. The three members of the Committee, Mrs. Butz, Mrs. Schneider, and Mrs. Sparschuh waited patiently until 5 o'clock while a few individuals brought donations of lint, bandages, and money. The following contributions have been received to date:

    Collected by Mrs. Butz $37.10
    " " Mrs. Sparschuh 17.42
    " " Mrs. Schlund 10.14
    " " Mrs. Bahe 8.15
    " " Mrs. Bohrmann 4.62
    " " Mrs. Schneider 18.00
    " " Mrs. Gindele 4.00
    2
    Total $99.43

    The time of the next meeting will be published. In the meantime, ladies may leave their packages with Mrs. Butz, 127 North La Salle Street, or with Mrs. Schneider, 110 North Clark Street. German owners of dry goods stores are urgently requested to contribute some pieces of shirting, which is badly needed. The material may be left in the store of C. Vorpahl, 35 La Salle Street, where receipts for donations will be issued.....

    The German Ladies' Society, which was organized for the purpose of furnishing lint, bandages and other materials for dressing wounds, and, above all, the money necessary to buy them, held ...

    German
    III B 2, I G, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 26, 1861
    The American Turnerbund and the War. (Editorial)

    Although the North American Turnerbund is dead, it was never more alive than it is now. As an entity it has just about entered the final stage of decay; yet its component parts have developed strength and energy as never before, and the strength and energy displayed by the individual parts of the Bund are guarantees that later a larger and stronger national society will be established.

    Nobody need grieve about the dissolution of the defunct Turnerbund, for it had outlived its usefulness and was marked for destruction as long as five years ago. At that time a schism in its ranks wrought damage that was not repaired, despite all efforts of S. R. Wiesner, editor of Turnzeitung, the Society's official organ, to instill new life into the national association. 2When the Turnzeitung collapsed as a result of the April riots in Baltimore, the last hour of the North American Turnerbuad had come.

    It had accomplished much good during the time of its existence, before, as well as after the schism; it had introduced as a permanent branch of education--a branch of which Americans physical education were unaware--not only into German-American circles but those of Anglo-Americans as well. Through the scientific lectures of Schuenemann-Pott, Stallo, and Solger, the Bund had engendered and fostered much mental activity among many of our German-American youths; it had established several good elementary and evening schools, or had caused their established; it had worked hand in hand with singing societies to make a place for German male choruses in America. In political battles it had served as the vanguard of the German-American element for some time; for after having taken a firm stand (through the adoption of the "Buffalo" platform in the fall of 1855) for the principles of the Republican party, which had been organized but a few years before, it soon widened this platform, which originally was directed against the further spreading of slavery, by making 3a strong attack on slavery itself (sic); Through the establishment of rifle clubs the Bund had provided military training for some of its members, and thereby, as we shall see, it had laid the foundation for reorganization. [Translator's note: The author is in error if he means to create the impression that this was the first evidence of the anti-slavery attitude of Americans of German descent. Long before the birth of the Republican party, in fact, nearly a hundred years before the American Declaration of Independence was signed in 1688, German Menonites in Germantown, Pennsylvania, under the leadership of their pastor, the Reverend Daniel Pastorius, publicly protested against slavery as an institution.]

    Indeed, the Turnerbund had a long and honorable existence, but owing to indifference among the members its usefulness was impaired, and its services dwindled more and more. It would require too much time and space to trace all the causes of this indifference; we will mention briefly one of the chief causes, namely, the purely material tendencies which became especially noticeable after Turner saloons were opened in many cities. At that time individual 4Turner organizations actually were nothing but saloonkeepers' and beer speculators' associations; in some instances vain and idle formalism supplanted noble endearers and estranged many older members who had rendered valuable services and were the pillars of the organization.

    However, these bad symptoms began to vanish when the great battle against The Southern Rebels was begun....

    The Turner will see to it that history will relate and praise them for many more and much greater deeds. Even now they merit the distinction of having furnished proportionately more men for the army of the Union than any other association in the United States. Though they were snubbed, ridiculed, and neglected, their ardor for combat did not wave; moreover it grew when difficulties increased, and since Siegel and Willich issued their first warnings, Turner fighters have doubled their efforts.

    It is to be deplored that all Turners serving in the various regiments of 5the Union Army cannot be united into one large Turner corps, or perhaps into two; one could be placed under the command of Siegel, and the other under Willich, for they are both Turners. Perhaps it is better that they are distributed among the various corps, and that, for instance, the Turner rifle men of Cincinnati are operating in the mountains of West Virginia, the Turner rifle men of the State of New York are located at Fort Monroe, those of Philadelphia are in the vicinity of Alexandria, and some Turner of Chicago are serving in the southeastern part of Missouri. Their military efficiency and, we may add, their staunchness, zeal, and endeavor, which have been renewed and increased on the field of battle, and their desire to fight a war for the liberation of men from the bonds of slavery rather than a political war, have been a source of strength and inspiration for the various army corps, especially for the Germans troops. And that Turner are able to operate as larger units is evinced by the services of the New York Turner Regiment.

    Just as German Turners of the North, though they are spread over every part 6of the theatre of war, form in spirit one great brotherhood in arms, so they will form one great association, a regenerated and purified Turnerbund. The best and ablest German men will gladly join that Bund; for it will be their task, not only to resume the noble and elevating work of the old Turnerbund, but also to counteract the moral and physical debility which will follow in the wake of this great struggle, to prevent the atrophy of the good results of this war, and above all, to protect the good which Americans of German descent will reap from the victory of the North against the envy and wiles of nativism.

    Although the North American Turnerbund is dead, it was never more alive than it is now. As an entity it has just about entered the final stage of decay; yet ...

    German
    II B 3, I G, I J, III D, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 14, 1861
    Semiannual Meeting of the German Society of Chicago

    Yesterday the German society of Chicago held its semiannual meeting. Only a few members attended.

    Since there is so little money in the treasury, it was proposed that a ball or a fair be held. The members decided on a ball, and authorized the executive board to make arrangements for a future fair or concert.

    Mr. Charles Verghoe was elected treasurer by acclamation.

    Upon recommendation of the agent of the Society his semiannual report was read; it was adopted, and the members voted to publish it. Adjournment followed.

    Yesterday the German society of Chicago held its semiannual meeting. Only a few members attended. Since there is so little money in the treasury, it was proposed that a ball ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 22, 1861
    In Behalf of Hecker's Regiment

    The Chicago Turngemeinde gave an entertainment last Saturday at 8 P. M., in Kinzie Hall, for the benefit of the Ladies Aid Society of Chicago. The latter organization wishes to furnish Hecker's Regiment with bandages and other indispensible articles. The entertainment was not only a social success, but its results also showed the popularity of the performances of the Chicago Turngemeinde, and the extent of our German population's love and esteem for the Regiment which is led by brave Hecker, the idol of German Republican youths.

    According to the published report, the receipts for admission were $42.50, and the receipts at the bar, $74.50. Total disbursements were $63.55. The German newspapers advertised the entertainment free of charge.

    We would like to announce that ladies who wish to employ their dainty hands in promoting the health and comfort of our brave German soldiers may 2obtain materials from Mrs. Caspar Butz, 127 La Salle Street, or from Mrs. Georg Schneider, 110 North Clark Street.

    The Chicago Turngemeinde gave an entertainment last Saturday at 8 P. M., in Kinzie Hall, for the benefit of the Ladies Aid Society of Chicago. The latter organization wishes to ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, III D, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 06, 1861
    The Chicago Arbeiterverein and Hecker's Regiment

    The Chicago Arbeiterverein is always ready to defend the freedom or the honor of the German name and to aid some worthy charity. Last Sunday evening the Verein sponsored an entertainment for the benefit of the shamefully neglected soldiers of General Hecker's regiment. At the opening of the entertainment, Mr. Theodor Hielscher, a teacher, made a very appropriate address. The rest of the program consisted of readings and vocal and instrumental musical selections. The song rendered by Mrs. Lauterbach deserves special recognition and was enthusiastically applauded.

    When we state in conclusion that the assembly acknowledged the educational progress which the Arbeiterverein has made, we merely repeat what we have stated before. In the business meeting of the Chicago Arbeiterverein, held last Monday, a committee was appointed to deliver the proceeds of the entertainment--fifty dollars--to the Ladies' Aid Society. The following letter, dated November 4, 1861, is proof that this committee performed its duty:

    2

    "To Messrs. Kersten, Brentano, and Schoenemann, Members of the Committee of the Chicago Arbeiterverein:

    "Acknowledging receipt of $50, the proceeds from the entertainment given by the Chicago Arbeiterverein last Sunday evening, I thank you in the name of the soldiers of General Hecker's regiment, for whose benefit the money is to be used. This generous evidence of your sympathy for the cause of freedom and for the suffering and privations of our brave fighters will not be forgotten. The Ladies' Aid Society is very grateful to you for your contribution, and you may rest assured that the money will be used for the purpose for which it is intended.

    "In the name of the Ladies' Aid Society,

    Julie Butz."

    The Chicago Arbeiterverein is always ready to defend the freedom or the honor of the German name and to aid some worthy charity. Last Sunday evening the Verein sponsored an ...

    German
    II D 10, III D, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 23, 1862
    Report on Annual Ball of the German Society of Chicago

    Receipts

    Sale of tickets $214.00
    Lottery tickets 37.75
    Refreshments 111.40
    Donations 1.50
    Total $364.65

    Disbursements

    Music $ 25.00
    Hall 8.00
    Printing 6.50
    Miscellaneous 2.00
    2
    Counterfeit $ 3.00
    Total 44.50
    Net Proceeds $319.85

    In the name of the needy who receive help from the German Society of Chicago I heartily thank all who participated in this ball. The work of the magnaminous, sympathetic ladies whose efforts made the ball a success is hereby gratefully acknowledged. Some of them were more successful than others in selling tickets, nevertheless all of them deserve honorable mention. I am particularly grateful to Miss Grommes who handled the sale of lottery tickets; also to Mr. Huck, Bush and Brand, Hiller, Fischer and Lehmann, Wilhelh Gottfried and Schoenhoefer, Bier-John, and Siebert for their generous donations of beer.

    As usual, the press gave us their splendid support.

    3

    Later we shall have more to say about the German Society of Chicago and its benevolent activity.

    Henry Greenbaum, President.

    Receipts <table> <tr> <td>Sale of tickets</td> <td>$214.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Lottery tickets</td> <td>37.75</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Refreshments</td> <td>111.40</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Donations</td> <td>1.50</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Total</td> <td>$364.65</td> </tr> </table> Disbursements <table> <tr> <td>Music</td> ...

    German
    III B 2, II A 2, II D 10, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 18, 1862
    Concert for German Unionists Who Were Driven Out of Missouri

    The Freie Saengerbund (Liberty Chorus) has the honor of being the first organization to act in behalf of our countrymen who were driven out of Missouri. Last Thursday's issue of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung brought the news that four German families who are true to the Union had arrived in Chicago after having been expelled from Missouri, and hardly had we requested the local German societies to devise ways and means of providing for these unfortunate people--martyrs to the cause of liberty and the Union--when the Saengerbund took steps to arrange for a concert, the proceeds of which were to be devoted to the support of these refugees from Missouri.

    Hans Balatka, director of music, all members of the Light Guard Band, and the orchestra of McVickers Theatre, immediately offered to help the Saengerbund; the Board of Management of the German House furnished the hall gratis, the German newspapers donated the necessary advertising space, the German brewers and 2and wine merchants sent beer and wine, and German grocers contributed coffee, sugar, and milk.

    The brewers mentioned were Lill and Diversey, John Huck, Schott and Metz, Busch and Brand, Ludwick and Martin, Seip and Lehmann, Mueller Brothers, and Siebert and Schmidt. Wine merchants who contributed were: Baer, Koeffler, Suess, and Kronfuss. Grocers named were: Arnold Breuer and the Kirchhoff Brothers. Milkman: Schaub.

    While Mrs. Puetz, Mrs. Adolf Mueller, and Miss Therese Diehl served coffee and refreshments, the well-known host, his brother, the former mayor of Guttenberg, Mr. Georg Diehl, and Mr. John Mayer were kept busy at the bar.

    Although there was very little time to make and carry out arrangements, and though the weather invited outdoor activity, the Hall was filled to capacity by the elite of our German citizens. It was a great satisfaction for those present to note that the first call to aid oppressed citizens was answered both 3by those who were willing to give of their art and their talents, and by those who had their pocketbooks wide open.

    The success was unexpected under prevailing conditions. A total of $119.54 was given to the families who were driven out of Missouri.

    It is reported that other organizations are now making arrangements to outdo the Saengerbund. We say: Full steam ahead!

    The Freie Saengerbund (Liberty Chorus) has the honor of being the first organization to act in behalf of our countrymen who were driven out of Missouri. Last Thursday's issue of ...

    German
    I J, I G, III B 2, II D 10, II A 3 b