The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 29, 1863
    Realty News

    A large crew of laborers is at present engaged in tearing down a number of old buildings on the west side of North Clark Street, between Kinzie and North Water Streets, to make room for a large brick building, which will be erected by Mr. Charles Ulich, and which will extend from North Water Street to Kinzie Street. The first story will contain a number of stores, which have already been rented at a very high rental. The second story will be arranged for offices, and the third story, which will measure 25 feet in height, will be divided into two spacious halls. The larger one will be used as a dance hall, and the smaller will serve as a meeting place for the Masonic Order. The cost of the structure is estimated at $100,000.

    A large crew of laborers is at present engaged in tearing down a number of old buildings on the west side of North Clark Street, between Kinzie and North Water ...

    German
    II F, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 16, 1863
    German Industry and its Results A Visit to the Brewery of Mr. John A. Huck

    On the shore of Lake Michigan, not far from the Catholic cemetery, on the North Side of Chicago, you will find the brewery of John A. Huck which is one of the largest and best equipped plants of its kind that we have ever seen.

    Mr. Huck did not inherit this brewery from his forefathers, nor did he have the necessary money to erect the magnificent buildings when he came here from Europe.

    No, when he left his home in the beautiful valley of the Rhine, he possessed no wealth whatsoever; but he did have resources which are of much more value than money in a country where industry has free course; he had an alert mind and an abundance of energy and determination.

    2

    The great buildings which so proudly shine forth in their splendor on Lake Michigan's shore and harbor and which hold an abundance of that tasty, wholesome, amber fluid in their cellars, are monuments of the successful application of diligence, energy, and perseverance. It was but a few years ago that John A. Huck came to this city. At that time Chicago was only an unimportant village, and Mr. Huck established a small business proportionate to the size of the city and the size of his pocketbook. His enterprise was successful; his business grew rapidly in size and importance, and today the John A. Huck Brewery is favorably known for its fine product throughout the entire northwestern part of the United States.

    However, the business of this industrious citizen has not yet reached the peak of its expansion. On our visit we were informed that plans are being made to add a third story to the two-story brick brewery this summer and to transfer the enormous cooling vats to the new addition. Height and distance are of no significance in Huck's Brewery; for a forty horsepower steam engine is used to perform all the heavy work in the mash vat as well as in the 3malt building and in the cellar.

    Mr. Huck has done something which formerly was regarded as impossible; he has constructed beer cellars in sandy soil--the first and only cellars of their kind in Chicago. Above these cellars, and extending over their entire length and width, are three adjoining icehouses, the walls of which are surrounded by a double wooden wall filled with tanner's bark; the barrels of beer lie between thick rows of ice. The temperature is always very low, even during the hottest days of summer.

    The new malt house is a three-story brick structure in which there are two cross-arched malt cellars 150 feet long. At each end of this building are two enormous ovens in which 1500 bushels of malt can be roasted at one time.

    From this brief description the reader can get some idea of the extent of Mr. Huck's business and of the great progress the brewing industry has made in the Northwest during the past few years.

    4

    However, it is not the size of the plant, nor its modern equipment, but the quality of the product which is the chief element of Mr. Huck's success. [Translator's note: The author is not consistent, for he has previously attributed Mr. Huck's success to his industry and determination.]

    John Anton Huck was born May 15, 1819, at Ottenhofen, Grand Duchy of Baden, Germany. After graduating from an elementary school, he received extensive theoretical and practical instruction in brewing.

    He emigrated from Germany in the year 1845, and spent one year in the employ of a brewery located in Kingston, Canada. Late in 1846 he came to Chicago where he met Johann Schneider, and the two men became partners in a brewing business. They rented the block bounded by Chicago Avenue, Rush Street, Superior Street, and Cass Street, and erected a small brewery on the site. Much of the vacant part of the plot was used as a picnic ground where many of the German clubs and societies of that day gathered for their annual outings. In 1850 Mr. Schneider contracted the "gold fever" and went to 5California, after selling his share of the business to Mr. Huck.

    Mr. Huck was very successful in his business venture. In 1854 he built a brick brewery at State and Schiller Streets, and in 1854 he erected an addition. By 1871 he owned the largest and best equipped brewery in the West. It was considered to be a model plant by the leading brewers of the day.

    On October 10, 1871, Mr. Huck's brewery was destroyed by fire, and he devoted the rest of his life to small deals in real estate, doing much towards rebuilding Chicago.

    He was a member of the Chicago City Council for two years and held membership in the Masonic Order and other societies.

    He married Josephine Eckerly in Germany on August 12, 1840. Their union was blessed with nine children. He died January 28, 1878.

    On the shore of Lake Michigan, not far from the Catholic cemetery, on the North Side of Chicago, you will find the brewery of John A. Huck which is one ...

    German
    II A 2, IV, II F
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 26, 1863
    [Turngemeinde to Build Gymnasium]

    The Chicago Turngemeinde leased a lot, 101 by 160 feet, on North Clark Street, north of Melm's Garden, for a period of ten years. The lease contains a provision that the Turngemeinde may purchase the property within the specified time. The rental is $500 annually for the first five years, and $600 annually for the last five years. The Turngemeinde intends to erect a gymnasium on the lot, and the members are showing great enthusiasm for the enterprise. The Turner Company of the old Hecker Regiment has already subscribed for $645 worth of stock and sent the money in cash, promising to purchase more shares later.

    The building committee is very active and will immediately take all steps necessary to get construction under way, since the building is to be ready for use before winter.

    The Chicago Turngemeinde leased a lot, 101 by 160 feet, on North Clark Street, north of Melm's Garden, for a period of ten years. The lease contains a provision that ...

    German
    II B 3, II F
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 21, 1872
    The Evangelical Community in Chicago. By Rev. M. Stamm.

    Late in the summer of 1836, a considerable number of German families, mostly Alsatians, moved from the town of Warren, Pa., to the state of Illinois, and settled in four different groups, partly in the city of Chicago, at Dutchmans Point, and at Wheeling, Cook County; also at Naperville, and at Sharon on the Rock River. As they were in these vast prairies without any pastoral care, they addressed together several petitions to the Western Conference of the Evangelical Community, whose activities at this time extended to Ohio, to send them a preacher. In the first days of July, 1837, a member of the Conference, Rev. F. Boos, undertook the long and hazardous journey on horseback, arriving in Chicago, after endless hardships, on July 23rd. He was the first Protestant minister to proclaim God's word in the German language to the Germans of Chicago, 2Dutchmans Point, Wheeling, and Naperville. In these places he organized the first German Protestant communities in the Northwest, and made them elect so-called class leaders who would preside over their meetings till they could get their own ministers. This done, Rev. Boos immediately returned to his district in Ohio, which had an extent of 300 to 400 miles.

    For eight months these communities were without a preacher. Then the Western Conference took up activities in Illinois and sent Rev. M. Hauert. Mr. Hauert reached Chicago on September 3rd, 1838, and travelled, as the second German Protestant minister, to most of the German settlements in Illinois. His salary for a whole year then amounted to only $74.32. At the Conference he could report a total of 78 members in Illinois.

    3

    The first German Protestant church in all the Northwest states was built by the community in Wheeling of squared logs. Wheeling became the center of all church activities of this Protestant community. From 1840 on, every Sunday a German sermon was given in Chicago. In this year the Rev. J. Hoffert and Rev. D. Kern preached; in 1841 Rev. H. Stroh, and again D. Kern; in 1842 the Rev. Dr. Wahl and Rev. A. Plank. Wahl who, a few years later, left the church on account of his insufficient salary, became the first permanent German minister in Chicago. His community was given two excellent lots by the "Canal Camp ", corner of Wabash and Monroe, on which they built the first German-Protestant church in Chicago. Rev. G. Augenstein succeeded as minister in 1844.

    In 1854 the community sold its property for $6,000 and split into two parts, each receiving $3,000. One part built with this a church, first on S. Clark Street, sold it, and built in 1856 on the corner of Third Ave. and Polk Street, for $8,000, one of the best German churches of brick, which it still owns.

    4

    The Illinois Staats Zeitung gave a detailed account of its dedication. This community was again divided in 1864, on the initiative of the Illinois Conference, and on a far part of it, Rev. J. G. Escher built a pleasant mission chapel, on the corner of 12th and Union streets.

    The other half of the old Wabash Avenue community built a church, corner of N. Wells street and Chicago Avenue. Internal difficulties led to a division in 1869. One part built one of our best city churches under the leadership of Rev. J. Schafle on Second and Noble streets. The main part of the Wells Street community built in 1869 our biggest and finest church at Sedgwick and Wisconsin streets, under the active guidance of Rev. J. Miller. The third and smallest part of the old Wells Street community built a magnificent hall on N. Wells Street community built a magnificent hall on N. Wells Street with three beautiful shops; separated completely from the Evangelical community, and elected the Rev. J. P. Kramer 5its temporary minister. In the great fire this hall and the church on Wisconsin Street were destroyed. The Wisconsin Street community will rebuild early in the summer. The independent community has already built during the winter, under the supervision of the Rev. Augenstein. At the dedication they declared themselves willing to return to the Evangelical community..........

    To sum up: The Evangelical community now has five communities with 550 members, five churches and four parsonages, and 3,000 volumes in its libraries. Out of the five small communities of 1836 have grown in 36 years, six conferences with about 725 permanent ministers, 30,000 church members, 400 Sunday schools, and a flourishing college at Naperville. This church also possesses the oldest and largest German church paper in the U. S., with 20,000 subscribers distributed over most of the Western States. A similar spiritual propagation no church or organization in the whole United States can boast.

    Late in the summer of 1836, a considerable number of German families, mostly Alsatians, moved from the town of Warren, Pa., to the state of Illinois, and settled in four ...

    German
    III C, II F, III H, III G, III A, V A 1, I A 2 b, II B 2 d 1, III F
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 05, 1872
    [The Humboldt Park Residential District]

    The surroundings of Humboldt Park, the biggest park of the city which promises to become also the most beautiful, are on the way to transform into a magnificent residential district.

    That it can take only a short time till this so splendidly planned park will be densely surrounded by houses, no one who has witnessed the fast development of American cities and especially of Chicago, will doubt.

    Already there are beautiful houses around the ravishing little Wicker Park which lies between Robey Street and Milwaukee Avenue, like that of Alderman Buhler and others. Already the land between Western and California Avenue, between Blackhawk Street and Northern Avenue, is parcelled out and sold, and all other real estate in the neighbourhood of the Park is in the market.

    2

    Part of this real estate belongs to the Humboldt Park Residential Association, a company to which we regard it our duty to call the attention of the German public. At its head stands Mr. Franz Arnold as, president; Carl Proebsting as secretary; and Heinrich Greenebaum as trustee, all three are men who enjoy the fullest confidence of the German public. This company offers the land which it owns according to a plan that is new for America, but has been found very successful in Europe.......We regard the enterprise as very timely and useful for the public, and believe that no one can better use his savings than by becoming a shareholder of this company. We are not surprised that, yesterday, in the four first hours, 260 shares of the company were sold.

    The surroundings of Humboldt Park, the biggest park of the city which promises to become also the most beautiful, are on the way to transform into a magnificent residential district. ...

    German
    II A 2, II F
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 13, 1875
    Real Estate Uhlich Estate on the Market

    It will be of great interest to the public that the Uhlich tract, consisting of sixty acres, is to be sold. This valuable property is bounded by State Street, Wentworth Avenue, 22nd Street, and 27th Street. It belonged to Carl Gottlieb Uhlich, who died in the year 1867.

    The fact that the heirs were engaged in litigation probably explains why the land was never subdivided, although the city long ago spread to the south, east and west of that location. This also accounts for the fact that little building activity was apparent and all structures there were so greatly neglected. The ground was always a welcome place for circuses, menageries, and baseball players.

    Now that litigation has come to an end, all streets which cross the property, 23rd, 24th, Dearborn, and Arnold Streets, will be opened. The old wooden 2hovels, and probably also the dilapidated hotel on 22nd and State Streets, will be replaced by new structures and 22nd Street west of State Street is to be widened to conform to the measures of the east section of the street.

    The land was bought for a few thousand dollars in 1845 and is now valued at millions of dollars.

    The principal owners of the property are John Muehlke and Ernst Uhlich, who are also the administrators of the estate of C. G. Uhlich, deceased.

    Now that the litigation about the estate has been settled, the Uhlich Block on North Clark Street will be rebuilt.

    It will be of great interest to the public that the Uhlich tract, consisting of sixty acres, is to be sold. This valuable property is bounded by State Street, Wentworth ...

    German
    II F, IV, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 27, 1879
    Real-Estate Transaction

    Charlotte Ketz sold some property on Sedgwick Street north of Wisconsin Street to Johanna E. Mueller for $20,000.

    Charlotte Ketz sold some property on Sedgwick Street north of Wisconsin Street to Johanna E. Mueller for $20,000.

    German
    II F
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 03, 1879
    Free Sons of Israel

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to its poor and sick members, as well as the help to their widows and orphans, and the decent burials of the dead, give convincing proof of its humanitarian spirit. There are eight lodges of this Order in Chicago at present, and it was decided three years ago that the Order should have its own cemetery; as a consequence thereof, five and one-half acres of land were bought near Waldheim (Forest Home). Through an assessment of five dollars on each member, the first payments were made, a fence was erected, a caretaker's house was built, and trees were planted, etc.

    The administration in charge of the burial ground is called the Cemetery Association of the Free Sons [of Israel], and it consists of three delegates from each lodge. Thus far, only a few family burial plots have been sold and the Association, therefore, is confronted with large debts. [In order to remedy this situation] the Cemetery Association resolved to hold a fair 2at Uhlich's Hall, from March 2 to 9, in order to pay off the mortgage. The general public is requested to give generous support to this philanthropic endeavor, and, particularly, not to let the various committee members, who are entrusted with collections, go away empty-handed when they come seeking articles for the fair.

    The Esther Lodge, a ladies auxiliary club of the Order, has already shown active interest and obtained gratifying results, which will do much in making the fair an outstanding as well as a financial success.

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, II F, II D 1, II A 2, I D 1 b, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 03, 1879
    Real Estate

    During the past week the Singer Building was sold to Field, Leiter and Company for $750,000--the outstanding real-estate transaction thus far recorded in the history of Chicago. Through this sale State Street is destined to be the center of the dry goods stores district for many years to come....

    During the past week the Singer Building was sold to Field, Leiter and Company for $750,000--the outstanding real-estate transaction thus far recorded in the history of Chicago. Through this sale ...

    German
    II F, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 17, 1879
    Real-Estate Transaction

    K. and R. N. Isham sold twenty acres on Diversey Avenue, northeast of the Chicago River, to J. Wickler for $11,000.

    K. and R. N. Isham sold twenty acres on Diversey Avenue, northeast of the Chicago River, to J. Wickler for $11,000.

    German
    II F