The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 08, 1871
    Editorial:"The Dictators of the Erie Railroad."

    "Vanderbilt, Gould and Fisk are typical of the American finance and railroad world. They do openly what the directors of other companies do under cover and which is the fleecing of share-holders, and of the public with the help of the legislature and the Courts of New York. From time to time the great public is permitted to take a look behind the curtain, as a year and a half ago, in "The Chapters on Erie" by Charles Francis Adams, Jr., and since then, through the various attempts made by the unfortunate shareholders to rid themselves of the dictators.

    One connection is that of Gould and Fisk, with Tweed and Sweeney and these dictators of the New York City, and State democracy, makes it all but impossible to attack and to shake the dictatorship over the Erie. The further development of the fight will determine the judgment of the world about the Courts and the Legislature of New York.

    "Vanderbilt, Gould and Fisk are typical of the American finance and railroad world. They do openly what the directors of other companies do under cover and which is the fleecing ...

    German
    I D 1 a, II E 1, I F 6
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 03, 1876
    [Evasion of the Liouor Tax]

    No news has come from the whiskey war. The excitement caused by last Friday's events is beginning to fade. The calm of Mr. Hesing, Rehm, and Miller leads people to believe that these gentlemen will be able to refute all the accusations made against them at the proper time and place. Of course this event gave plenty of writing material for a press eager for scandals. How facts were distorted, can be seen in the ridiculous reports concerning Hesing's arrest.

    We read of how he was sitting at his desk in his private office, how the sheriff read a law paragraph to him, and how Hesing became deathly pale, etc., etc. As a matter of fact, Mr. Hesing was just in the business office, talking with the secretary of the Staats Zeitung, Mr. Pietschand Mr. Raster concerning a business proposition. When the sheriff entered, he motioned Mr. Hesing towards the window and whispered a few words to him. Thereupon Hesing told Raster that he had to go to Hoyne's office and asked him to accompany him. Both then left, followed by the sheriff. At Mr. Hoyne's office Mr. Hesing signed a bond and returned to his office.

    The arrest of Mr. J. Rehm is also mere fiction. He was not arrested at all.

    2

    When he heard at the Staats Zeitung that the same fate was awaiting him, he went at once to Hoyne's office, accompanied by A. Loeb, who served as his bondsman.

    No news has come from the whiskey war. The excitement caused by last Friday's events is beginning to fade. The calm of Mr. Hesing, Rehm, and Miller leads people to ...

    German
    I F 6, IV, II E 1, II A 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Chicago Tribune -- January 27, 1876
    Whisky Indictment against Hesing, Rehm, Hoyt, Mintz and Others.

    Mr. Hesing's first indictment required $50,000 bail and the latter two, $10,000 each making a total of $70,000 bail. The first indictment charges Hesing as conspiring with Rehm, the second with conspiring with August Newhaus, a storekeeper at the Lake Shore Distillery, and the third is against Hesing, himself as a distiller, the charge being simply that of conspiracy to defraud the Government of the Internal Revenue Tax.

    Mr. A. C. Hesing was visited at his residence last evening by a Tribune reporter, whose mission was to interrogate him in regard to the indictments found against him by the Grand Jury. Mr. Hesing stated that he had necessarily felt much annoyed at what he regarded as causeless persecution on the part of the Government, but he was confident of a triumphant acquittal if an unprejudiced jury could be obtained.

    2

    He had no idea on what the charges against him were based. He had never been inside of a distillery but once, and knew nothing of crooked whisky. He did not see how he could be justly accused of conspiracy; as his influence with the Government had always been exceedingly slight, and very little good it would do for him to conspire. In regard to the trial, Mr. Hesing said that he had engaged Mr. Edmund Juessen as his attorney, and he would enter a plea of not guilty. Mr. Hesing will be on hand this morning to give bail.

    The indictment against Rehm is simply that of conspiracy with Hesing, and the bail was fixed at $50,000.

    Mr. Hesing's first indictment required $50,000 bail and the latter two, $10,000 each making a total of $70,000 bail. The first indictment charges Hesing as conspiring with Rehm, the second ...

    German
    II E 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 18, 1876
    A. C. Hesing.

    Yesterday the trial of Rehm, Hoyt and Hesing took place in the Federal Court building. There were three indictments against A. C. Hesing. The main indictment accused him of having conspired with Rehm and Hoyt to defraud the Government of brandy taxes. The other indictments were against Hesing as being a distiller. Hessing's position was made clear at yesterday's proceedings. The indictment which accused Hesing of having taken part in a conspiracy to bribe tax officials and to put up an organization aiming at tax fraud was dropped.

    Except for passing of the sentence, the legal proceedings against A. C. Hesing are thus at an end. That the prosecuting attorney dropped the main indictment to try A. C. Hesing on the same charges as the other distillers is the best proof that Hesing has taken no part in the bribing of tax officials.

    2

    The connection of Mr. Hesing with the tax fraud is solely due to the fact that he has always been ready to stand by his friends, when they needed his help. Out of pure friendship he guaranteed some years ago the obligations of a few distillers and signed the bonds required by the Government. For this risk, which was considerable at the time, the distillers gave him a part of their net profit and only in so far as this made him appear as a participant, did he become involved in this unfortunate affair. The moneys advanced to him occasionally by a few distillers to meet the election expenses, might have come partly from the profit of the brandy distillers, but it did not occur to him, to refuse on such suppositions, moneys given for general political purposes.

    Anyone who is acquainted with Mr. Hesing knows that in his long political life he has made great contributions to party purposes. If now, reasons of friendship have made him appear as a participant in the 3conduct of his business partners, it must be remembered that, the indictment charging criminal intention having been dropped, he has been freed from reproach of unethical motives.

    Yesterday the trial of Rehm, Hoyt and Hesing took place in the Federal Court building. There were three indictments against A. C. Hesing. The main indictment accused him of having ...

    German
    I F 6, IV, II E 2, II E 1, II A 2, I D 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 13, 1876
    Important Shareholder of the Neue Freie Presse Takes to Flight.

    The public was told by the Times yesterday that city tax comptroller Von Hollen had taken to flight. He left the city Wednesday evening on the Michigan Central railroad. He probably will go to Europe via Canada and Quebec. He said shortly before his departure that he intended to go directly to Germany, in order to raise enough on the family estate to repay the deficit to the city. Those who know him best, do not doubt that he will pay back the deficit should he be able to do so. His kindness and pleasant manners made him popular everywhere, so that he was constantly the victim of sharpers, who preferred to borrow rather than to steal. From all the money with which he has absconded, he took only enough along to cover his expenses and to his wife he left but $350, to take care of herself and her children. The family home is at the corner of May and Lake Streets. The bond of Von Hollen is $250,000 and is the highest of any city employee. His bondsmen are John Feulner, Mike Evans Clark Lipe, Franz Binz, John Berry and Louis Schultze. Clark Lipe seems to be the only one able to cover the deficit without having to go bankrupt. If he will do it is another matter. Only one point of the account of the Times needs further elucidation and that is that Von Hollen was introduced to the gambling hells through Frank B. Wilkie 2editor-in-chief of the Times. He is reputed to play only with marked cards and to have or have had in his pocket most of the money embezzled by Von Hollen. Through Frank B. Wilkie also, the Times received the first news of Von Hollen's flight.

    The public was told by the Times yesterday that city tax comptroller Von Hollen had taken to flight. He left the city Wednesday evening on the Michigan Central railroad. He ...

    German
    I F 6, IV, III H, II E 1, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 22, 1876
    Who Lies?

    The readers will remember that the notice of Hollen's flight also mentioned the fact that he was a share holder of the Neue Freie Presse. The publisher of the Freie Presse branded this information as a lie. We are now, fortunately, able to prove our point, not only through the repeated assertions of George von Hollen but also through the signature of Richard Michaelis himself.

    Before his departure, George Von Hollen entrusted the settlement of his business affairs to the lawyer, A. S. Trude. The latter received recently several letters from him. Mr. Trude was kind enough to show us the following letter he received from Hollen:

    "Canada, May 17, 1876. Dear Mr. Trude, Far away from home, I am awaiting here the verdict of public opinion. When I look back, I realize that I have been a tool as well as a fool in the hands of gamblers and of designing politicians. The servile Chicago newspapers are on my desk and what hurts most is that some of them state that I have been a visitor of houses of ill fame.

    "As I see, the Staats Zeitung and the Neue Freie Presse had a quarrel about me. How does this bum Michaelis dare to deny that he received money from me 2through blackmail? Perhaps this receipt for $300 which I am leaving in your hands, will shut his mouth."

    The first receipt reads as follows: "Chicago, June 2, 1874. Germania Bank of Chicago, S. E. Cor. Washington and 5th Ave. Pay to Geo. von Hollen on order three hundred dollars. Von Hollen and Kluetsch."

    On the back is written: "Pay to the order of Free Press. Geo. von Hollen". And the other receipt: "Free Press Printing Co. R. Michaelis." There is further the following item, written by Hollen when he mailed the note to Trude: "Blackmailed out of by R. Michaelis, Editor, Free Press (German Daily Newspaper)."

    The readers will remember that the notice of Hollen's flight also mentioned the fact that he was a share holder of the Neue Freie Presse. The publisher of the Freie ...

    German
    I F 6, IV, II E 1, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 25, 1876
    Von Hollen and the Gamblers.

    A very amusing scene took place yesterday in the city council room. Aldermen Cullerton, Wheeler and Thompson, functioning as a committee, were investigating what had become of the money taken by von Hollen. Orders to appear were sent to owners of prominent gambling houses. The committee was so informal in its proceedings that newspaper reporters did not know an inquiry was taking place. Not one witness was sworn in. George Holt said that von Hollen gambled several times in his tavern, sometimes losing $1,600. Similar reports were made by the other owners of gambling houses, and this ended the big investigation.

    A very amusing scene took place yesterday in the city council room. Aldermen Cullerton, Wheeler and Thompson, functioning as a committee, were investigating what had become of the money taken ...

    German
    I F 6, IV, II E 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 20, 1876
    End of Whiskey Trial Close at Hand.

    Before asking clemency from your honor for my client, A. C. Hesing, I wish to submit to the court several sworn statements.

    C. F. Pietsch says under oath, that he has been secretary of the Illinois Staats Zeitung since 1867. He has been an intimate friend of A. C. Hesing and was well acquainted with his personal affairs. He has kept the books for him and knows all his financial transactions since 1868. At the time of the big fire in 1871 Hesing owned five-eighths of all the shares of the Illinois Staats Zeitung, which shares brought him annually twenty percent interest. At that time he also owned half of the shares of the "Garden City Manufacturing Company" which brought in 1871 a profit of $65,000. Hesing also owned at that period some real estate worth about $25,000. Hesing had thus at that time a fortune of $250,000, free from debts. He lost a great deal of his fortune through the fire and through the bankruptcy of the Garden City Manufacturing Co., the obligations of which he took over. When he also lost the land on which the Simon-Powell was located, he was left completely penniless.

    Herman Raster says under oath, that he has been editor-in-chief of the 2Illinois Staats Zeitung since 1867. He says that when the office of federal tax collector was offered to A. C. Hesing, the latter refused to accept the position but used his influence to have Edmund Jussen appointed. When E. Jussen had to resign, the position was offered once more to A. C. Hesing but he again declined to accept it.

    When the undersigned, H. Raster, was appointed district collector, although he was an intimate friend of A. C. Hesing, the latter never tried to influence him in favor of a distiller or in the appointment of storekeepers. That he, Raster, is acquainted with Jacob Rehm and that due to the latter he appointed S. A. Irwin as his chief deputy. That on different occasions Rehm tried to influence him in the appointment of subalterns and storekeepers.

    E. Jussen says that he was federal tax collector from May 1st, 1869, until May 1st, 1871. That while he was in New York for medical treatment, A. C. Hesing using his influence, had the position offered to him without his asking first. That while he was federal collector, he never was influenced by A. C. Hesing in his official activities, that he was never was asked by him to appoint storekeepers in the district. That while A. C. Hesing was at that time connected with the Keller distillery, he never asked for any favors for this distillery, That Hesing never attempted to induce him to act 3dishonestly.

    That Jacob Rehm came to see him Feb. 21, 1871, and tried to give orders to him, E. Jussen, then federal tax collector, concerning the appointment of storekeepers. That E. Jussen refused to accept any orders and that he wrote at that time to Chas. B. Farwell about it, who then was a member of congress. Here is the letter:

    "Dear Mr. Farwell,

    "Your friend Jac. Rehm came to see me and criticized me on account of the appointments of my subordinates. I took it for granted that he was acting on his own, but his whole behavior indicated that he relied on a secret power. I wish to say that I am indifferent to his criticisms and that I shall take no orders from him.

    Respectfully yours,

    E. Jussen, Tax Collector."

    I never received any answer. But J. Rehm went suddenly to Washington and 4shortly thereafter I was relieved of my office.

    Now, I wish to ask your Honor to try the defendant merely as a distiller and not as the master mind of the conspiracy. Hesing's political enemies may misrepresent the facts but they cannot alter the truth. Who was it, who wanted to use me as a tool when I was tax collector? I only mention that, to prove that Hesing was not the ringleader.

    Before asking clemency from your honor for my client, A. C. Hesing, I wish to submit to the court several sworn statements. C. F. Pietsch says under oath, that he ...

    German
    I F 6, IV, II E 1, II A 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 16, 1877
    Italian Slave Dealers

    The shameful trade in Italian children which has already made its appearance in several cities and been prosecuted more than once has also come to light here. Emmanuel Mallelo, an Italian, living at 527 S. Clark St. was subjected to a severe grilling in the Southside police station for alleged Slave dealing in Italian children. Here is what happened: A little boy, unable to speak English, was met by a policeman freezing and crying. The friendly night policeman brought the boy to an Italian man, to help out as interpreter. The little one told, that his father had rented him out to Mallelo for twenty-five dollars a year. For that he was obliged to walk daily through the streets with his harp on his back and play music. The money thus collected he had to give to his cruel master in the evening. It was too bad for him if he did not hand over a minimum amount to his torturer. He was then beaten and received nothing to eat. Often he was sent out again into the dark night to complete the sum. If he was again unsuccessful he had to look for another shelter or sleep in the open.

    2

    The court proceeding revealed that Mallelo was keeping eight boys in similar bondage. He gave the boys shelter and food for one dollar a week. Investigations are continuing. It is to be hoped that charitable people will be found to take care of the little Italian slave.

    The shameful trade in Italian children which has already made its appearance in several cities and been prosecuted more than once has also come to light here. Emmanuel Mallelo, an ...

    Italian
    II E 1, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 06, 1877
    The German National Bank Requests Time for Payment.

    The Illinois Staats-Zeitung, had the unpleasant task of publishing the following item:

    The directors of the German National Bank, herewith report to their creditors, that on July 1st, 1877, the deposits of the bank amounted to $1,115,700. Since that time the deposits have gradually dwindled to $183,000. Without the creditors' indulgence the bank cannot continue to operate. This institution is in a position to pay the depositors in full, and still could show a profit for itself, but the directors ask for time necessary for transaction of business. Therefore, we request all depositors to refrain from drawing from their accounts, until we shall be in a position to pay them, without endangering a normal outcome of the present situation, while nothing would be gained by their forcing us into receivership.

    This we promise in good faith, confident that we can and will live up to it.

    2

    Henry Greenebaum)

    August Beck)

    L. Eliel) Directors

    Henry Leopold)

    S. F. Leopold)

    Albert M. Day)

    Hermann Schaffner, Cashier

    Chicago, December 5th, 1877.

    This report can hardly be considered as anything else but a declaration of insolvency, and regardless of the fact that a promise was given to keep the bank operating, it depends entirely on the creditors, who will have to decide whether they entrust the process of liquidation to the present officials, or prefer a receivership. Considering that the bank paid five-sixths of the deposits, in a period of four months, which is an excellent record, there would be no reason why the present officials should not be entrusted with the liquidation of the bank's assets.

    3

    In an interview granted to our reporter, Mr. Greenebaum declared that the bank will in all probability be able to pay every dollar it owes within the next two weeks, and of the shares amounting to $500,000 the shareholders will at least receive $400,000. What influence will the closing of the National Bank have on the house of Henry Greenebaum & Company, and on the savings bank under his management? Mr. Greenebaum's reply was that he hopes to be able to save that institution....It would be most regrettable, if the Greenebaum Bank, which was known for its honesty during the twenty-three years of its existence, should as a consequence of the National Bank's inability to meet its obligations, become insolvent also.

    This bank was established in 1871. The founders were Henry Greenebaum, Michael Greenebaum, David S. Greenebaum, Isaak Greenebaum, Beck and Wirth, John Herting, Leopold, Kuh & Co., Seipp and Lehmann, and other well-to-do German merchants. The bank enjoyed an excellent reputation and disposed of $2,000,000 in deposits in 1873.

    The Illinois Staats-Zeitung, had the unpleasant task of publishing the following item: The directors of the German National Bank, herewith report to their creditors, that on July 1st, 1877, the ...

    German
    II A 2, IV, II E 1