The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 05, 1863
    The German Society

    The general meeting of the German Society of Chicago was held in the German House, May 3, 1863, with President Heinrich Greenbaum presiding.

    The report of Agent Schlund was read and adopted, and the matter relating to the Reform School was referred to a committee which will endeavor to persuade the executive board of the Reform School to act in line with Mr. Schlund's suggestion.

    The financial report was adopted as read. Election of officers took place with the following result: president, Heinrich Gindele; treasurer, Karl Vergho; secretary, Conrad C. Diehl. Butz and Schneider were appointed to inform the above of their election. The following rules were adopted:

    1) The newly elected officers may not refuse to serve.

    2

    2) Minimum membership fee shall be two dollars. [Translator's note: The secretary does not state whether this sum is the annual or monthly fee.]

    3) Anyone who pays fifty cents or more shall be permitted to speak and vote in the general meetings for the period of one year.

    4) The salary of the agent shall be three hundred dollars per year.

    Heinrich Greenbaum, President.

    Report of the Agent of the German Society of Chicago for April and May, 1862

    April May
    Secured employment for 93 85
    Secured railroad passes for poor 3 1
    Secured railroad passes for wounded soldiers 3 1
    Found baggage for 11 2
    3
    April May
    Located relatives for 5 3
    Families allotted food 7 5
    Assisted in financial matters 8 6
    Found lodgings for families 6 2
    Secured medical aid and medicines for 7 5
    Soldiers' families supported 6 6
    Assisted immigrants to proceed on their journey 4 1
    Corresponded for 120 98
    Referred to county for aid 5 2
    Total 281 219
    Total for April and May 500

    My activity as agent of the German Society of Chicago was interrupted by the President's call for the organization of volunteer state militia. In my spare time I have devoted myself to helping needy immigrants and 4countrymen without remuneration from the Society, until the Conscription Act was passed; but now my term of service has expired.

    The German public of Chicago, a city where fifty thousand Teutons live, should pay more attention to immigration which is the cause of the great and rapid development of the city.

    While Americans annually spend large sums of money for benevolent purposes, as for instance, for orphan homes, homes for the friendless, and homes for the aged, the German Society of Chicago, which has become a refuge for helpless immigrants and needy German citizens, ought not fall asleep; for the German Society of Chicago is the only German organization which aids needy Germans without respect to origin or creed

    If our German citizens would cease helping every beggar and bum who comes to their door or approaches them in the streets, especially in the winter, and would donate corn, flour, meat, potatoes, etc., no Chicago family 5that is worthy of support would have to go hungry.

    The German Society has done much to increase the school attendance of poor children by exercising a "moral" compulsion--by giving shoes and clothing to those poor pupils who attend school regularly.

    We take great pleasure in commending the work done in the Juvenile Home, where German children were always heartily welcomed and well cared for.

    The Home of the Friendless is maintained for the benefit of children of dissolute or criminally inclined parents, or children who are in danger of entering upon a life of crime, and it has proved to be very effective. However the Home of the Friendless is not a suitable place for the children of poor but law-abiding parents; these children should be placed in more pleasant and less dangerous surroundings, so that they are not estranged from their parents and do not fall prey to greedy employers.

    6

    The Home for Workers is in its infancy. It is the most pleasant and most necessary of all branches of charity; for who is more deserving among the needy than the man or woman who is diligent and faithful and would like to work but is prevented from doing so by age and physical disability, and would rather starve than become an inmate of a poorhouse?

    In the Reform School there are proportionately few German boys; and the majority of them have been placed there because of youthful carelessness or indifference on the part of their parents, who either send their boys out to gather old iron and other junk, or permit them to loiter idly about the streets and alleys. In time the lads meet bad companions and finally are confined to reform schools, where they come into contact with confirmed and hardened offenders, and as a result the boys are totally demoralized.

    I hope that the German Society of Chicago endeavors to have juvenile delinquents classified, so that light offenders, first offenders, or those who do not participate in evil deeds, but just accompany the offenders, are not 7placed on the same level with, treated as, and confined with, real criminals, thieves, robbers, murderers, etc., but are kept separate from the latter.

    The inmates of the Reform School should be classified in the following manner: 1) Non-participating observer; 2) Seduced; 3) Corrigible; 4) Incorrigible.

    As in Germany, the societies "for the protection of German emigrants" are expanding their activity, so we also should take greater precautions to protect immigrants in our country.

    In conclusion I wish to emphasize that if the German Society of Chicago is not more alert, the thieves and confidence men in New York and other ports will have a gay time; for the German Society of Chicago and the St. Louis Immigrant Society have done more to prevent swindling than any other organization in the United States. The German Society of Chicago may justly be proud of the fact that it has exposed several attempts to defraud innocent people of large sums of money and valuable property, and has also succeeded 8in locating much valuable baggage.

    If the German immigrants who come to Chicago are left without a source of information or material aid, the city will not only lose its wide-spread reputation for the assistance rendered immigrants, but also will soon be deprived of the valuable services of these people.

    The Chicago Turnverein and the Chicago Arbeiterverein have done much for charitable purposes; however, the great majority of the members of these organizations are of the laboring class; many of them are members of the German Society of Chicago, and their zeal is commendable. Yet it is desirable that those who have wealth--home owners, businessmen, and professional men--take a greater and more active interest in benevolence. And they really are obligated, for they avail themselves of the services of the Society when they need help in their offices, stores, or homes.

    I wish to thank our president, Mr. Heinrich Greenbaum for the valuable 9aid he has given me in my work. He was always willing to assist me whenever difficulties presented themselves, though at times it was necessary that he neglect his business in order to comply with my request.

    I have always tried to be just toward everybody; if I appeared to be unsympathetic in some instances it was only because I wished to discourage people who are not worthy of assistance. There are a great number of beggars who journey from city to city; they are very successful in arousing the sympathy of the public, much more so than worthy applicants for aid. They manage to lead the existence which appeals to them by carefully avoiding any flagrant offense against the laws pertaining to vagrancy. When I refuse to feed or house these lazy persons, they slander the German Society of Chicago. And the public, not knowing that these professional beggars have been driven from some neighboring city by the civil authorities, believes their stories about about inhuman treatment.

    .......[The next paragraph of this article contains a repetition of previously 10expressed thoughts.]

    Respectfully,

    F. Schlund, Agent.

    ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT

    Receipts for 1862 and 1863 $652.07
    Disbursements for 1862 and 1863 246.50
    Balance $405.57

    Heinrich Greenbaum, President.

    May 2, 1863.

    The general meeting of the German Society of Chicago was held in the German House, May 3, 1863, with President Heinrich Greenbaum presiding. The report of Agent Schlund was read ...

    German
    III B 2, III G, III D, II E 3, II E 2, II D 3, II D 5, II D 4, II D 7, II D 8, I B 3 b, I D 1 a, II D 10

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 11, 1873
    A Letter. Treatment of the Germans in the Poor House. to the Illinois Staats-Zeitung

    I wish to inform the German people about conditions in the Cook County poorhouse, and how the Germans are treated in comparison with the Americans and Irish. Through misfortune I was forced to come here and was willing as much as my swollen feet permitted, to work. Still, I was obliged to shovel snow barefoot in the most bitter cold, because my shoes were too small. I begged the Superintendent for a pair of stockings but I could not get any. There are many old and young healthy people in the poorhouse, who have not been yet eight days in the county before being received here - American Irish and English - who are furnished pants, shoes and stockings, and yet are not allowed to work, while there are here also from sixty to seventy-year-old Germans, who, unable to speak English, receive nothing.

    The room and the work bosses are all Irish and the Germans have to work under their direction. Any sensible German here could give more information if he were asked. There are not only patient Swabians but also patient Germans, and 2they are oppressed not only by the temperance law but by the Americans.

    (An answer from the officials of the poorhouse will be published in our columns. Editor.)

    I wish to inform the German people about conditions in the Cook County poorhouse, and how the Germans are treated in comparison with the Americans and Irish. Through misfortune I ...

    German
    II D 5, I C
  • Svornost -- February 08, 1884
    Home for Forgotten People

    Last Wednesday there was held a meeting of the financial committee of the Home for Forgotten People. The treasurer's report is as follows: Income during the month of January, $1,105.34; expenses, $1,024.53; balance, $80.81. The Burov Mission took in during the same period of time $488.75, expended $251.30; balance, $237.45. The school department of the institution took in $375.65; expended $102; balance, $293.65. The total balance in the treasury consists of $611.91. The newly accepted inmates were 92 adults and 134 children; the released, 70 adults and 17 children. On Feb. 1st the institution lodged 139 people. The school of industry of the Burov Mission has 64 pupils.

    Last Wednesday there was held a meeting of the financial committee of the Home for Forgotten People. The treasurer's report is as follows: Income during the month of January, $1,105.34; ...

    Bohemian
    II D 10, II D 5, II D 4, II B 2 f
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- February 15, 1884
    [The Frauen-Verein Holds Annual Ball]

    The Frauen Verein of the German Society decided to hold the yearly ball on March 11th instead of February 26th on the foundation celebration day of the society.

    In order to talk the arrangements over they will hold, at Uhlich's Hall, Wednesday the 20th, a special meeting combined with a coffee Kranschen and invite all the members and their friends to attend.

    During the month of November, December and January $214.68 were taken in, the expenses for collecting and also postage amounted to $41.20. From the profits the Altenheim Fund received 20% or $42.92. From the balance the German Society received one third and $87.00 were given for charitable purposes.

    The Frauen Verein of the German Society decided to hold the yearly ball on March 11th instead of February 26th on the foundation celebration day of the society. In order ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II D 5, II D 10, III B 2
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- February 21, 1884
    [The "Altenheim" Benefit Ball]

    For the "Altenheim" Ball, which will be held in the Nordseite Turnhalle on March 11th, a strong interest can be observed. Mrs. Buschik, No. 67 Goethe Street; Mrs. Schiller, No. 167 W. Adams Street; and Mrs. Philippi, No. 276 S. State Street, the first lady for the Northside, the second for the West-side and the third for the Southside, are in possession of the tickets for the Ball, and all the ladies who desire to participate in the sale of the tickets are requested to apply to the above-named three members. The ball will be followed by a concert and a free supper.

    For the "Altenheim" Ball, which will be held in the Nordseite Turnhalle on March 11th, a strong interest can be observed. Mrs. Buschik, No. 67 Goethe Street; Mrs. Schiller, No. ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II D 5
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- March 22, 1884
    [Das Altenheim (Old Peoples Home)]

    After the liquidation of the proceeds from the "Ladies Society D. G." on March 11th it was shown that the total receipts of the foundation ball amounted to $1130.00 from which after deducting expenses, a net profit of $760.00 remained. The Committee resolved to express publicly their appreciation to all those Gentlemen and Ladies, who helped to make a success of the affair.

    After the liquidation of the proceeds from the "Ladies Society D. G." on March 11th it was shown that the total receipts of the foundation ball amounted to $1130.00 from ...

    German
    II D 5
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- April 03, 1884
    [The German Society Ladies' Auxiliary]

    The directors of the German Society's Ladies Club held its monthly meeting yesterday. In the treasurer's report we find: Contributions received, $85.25; donations for the Altenheim fund through Mrs. Ebner $50.00; from the "Red Cross" Society $162.15 as half of the surplus from the collection for the Ohio flood-sufferers, for which the thanks of the directors will be expressed. Expenses were $85.25 for aid and $7.00 for collection. For aid in the month of April $65.50 was appropriated. A gold piece which was found at the anniversary festival ball, will be added to the Society fund, if not claimed by the loser at Mrs. F. Sommer's home, 2212 Archer Avenue.

    After resolving to call a general meeting for Tuesday the 8th inst. in order to prepare for the election of officers in Ulrich's Hall, adjournment took place.

    The directors of the German Society's Ladies Club held its monthly meeting yesterday. In the treasurer's report we find: Contributions received, $85.25; donations for the Altenheim fund through Mrs. Ebner ...

    German
    II D 10, II D 5
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- July 10, 1884
    The German Old People's Home Society of Chicago.

    Under the above name on June the 8th this Society has been founded with the purpose of independent action in the erection, maintenance and support of a "German Old People's Home." This institution will be open to any aged person unfit for work of both sexes, to be cared for to the end of their days.

    The existence of this Society finds assurance in the general acceptance of their plan and in the fact that it enjoys already a large membership...

    Under the above name on June the 8th this Society has been founded with the purpose of independent action in the erection, maintenance and support of a "German Old People's ...

    German
    II D 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 05, 1885
    An Accomplished Agreement

    Yesterday was a day, which should be marked with red letters in the history of the German Altenheim (Old People's Home). The Altenheim Verein (Old People's Home Society), which on account of misunderstanding had been founded as a separate organization independently from the already existing Ladies' Club of the German Aid Society, held an extraordinary meeting yesterday afternoon at Uhlich's Hall, presided over by Mrs. Spengler. A great many women, who belonged as members to the presently dissolving Ladies' Club, came to this meeting. After a hearty address of welcome by Mrs. Spengler, a constitution was read regarding the purpose and objects of the new organization, which will have now the name "Frauen Verein Ses Deutsch en Altenheims" (Women's Society of the German Old People's Home).

    After the constitution was accepted by acclamation, the president, Mrs. 2Spengler made the announcement, that the restoration of peace and the foundation of the new Women's Society would be celebrated on the 18th of March at Uhlich's Hall.

    Until then the meeting was adjourned.

    Yesterday was a day, which should be marked with red letters in the history of the German Altenheim (Old People's Home). The Altenheim Verein (Old People's Home Society), which on ...

    German
    II D 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 29, 1885
    The Old People's Home (Das Altenheim)

    The Herren-Directorium (Men' Directorate) of the German Old People's home held a meeting yesterday in John Buehler's office. Those present were Messrs. Hesing, Buehler, Rosenthal, Voss,Bocke, Heissler, Hettich, Junker, Drayer, Wampold and Bauer.

    Architect Bauer submitted his construction plan for the new Altenheim, which would cost $25,000, with an additional $5,000, for heat, ventilation and light installations. A resolution was adopted to have the construction carried out according to the submitted and accepted plan.

    Concerning the purchase of a tract of land for the lay-out of a boulevard to the new Altenheim, the owner Mr. Quick will be requested to make out an "abstract of title", after Messrs Rosenthal and Bocke shall have examined the property title. The purchase will then be concluded.

    According to the construction plan, the new building, covering a space of 100 x 40 square feet, will have three stories and a basement. The northern main front will be made of pressed brick with a terra cotta filling towardsthe roof, bearing the inscription: Deutsches Hand im Neuen Land, Schirmes Gott mit 2starker Hand, which translated, means: German House in this new land - May God protect it with his strong hand.

    Otherwise the construction will be simple and fireproof. The basement will contain the apartments of the manager and his assistants, also a dining room 52 x 121/2 ft., two kitchens and a toilet, furthermore, a store room.

    The first floor will have eleven bedrooms, one parlor, one waiting room, one office, one bathroom and one toilet. Some of the bedrooms will be a little larger to make room for 2 beds besides the customary additional furniture. All interior construction will be made of hard pine wood, polished with oil.

    The Herren-Directorium (Men' Directorate) of the German Old People's home held a meeting yesterday in John Buehler's office. Those present were Messrs. Hesing, Buehler, Rosenthal, Voss,Bocke, Heissler, Hettich, Junker, Drayer, ...

    German
    II D 5, I C, II F