The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 05, 1863
    The German Society

    The general meeting of the German Society of Chicago was held in the German House, May 3, 1863, with President Heinrich Greenbaum presiding.

    The report of Agent Schlund was read and adopted, and the matter relating to the Reform School was referred to a committee which will endeavor to persuade the executive board of the Reform School to act in line with Mr. Schlund's suggestion.

    The financial report was adopted as read. Election of officers took place with the following result: president, Heinrich Gindele; treasurer, Karl Vergho; secretary, Conrad C. Diehl. Butz and Schneider were appointed to inform the above of their election. The following rules were adopted:

    1) The newly elected officers may not refuse to serve.

    2

    2) Minimum membership fee shall be two dollars. [Translator's note: The secretary does not state whether this sum is the annual or monthly fee.]

    3) Anyone who pays fifty cents or more shall be permitted to speak and vote in the general meetings for the period of one year.

    4) The salary of the agent shall be three hundred dollars per year.

    Heinrich Greenbaum, President.

    Report of the Agent of the German Society of Chicago for April and May, 1862

    April May
    Secured employment for 93 85
    Secured railroad passes for poor 3 1
    Secured railroad passes for wounded soldiers 3 1
    Found baggage for 11 2
    3
    April May
    Located relatives for 5 3
    Families allotted food 7 5
    Assisted in financial matters 8 6
    Found lodgings for families 6 2
    Secured medical aid and medicines for 7 5
    Soldiers' families supported 6 6
    Assisted immigrants to proceed on their journey 4 1
    Corresponded for 120 98
    Referred to county for aid 5 2
    Total 281 219
    Total for April and May 500

    My activity as agent of the German Society of Chicago was interrupted by the President's call for the organization of volunteer state militia. In my spare time I have devoted myself to helping needy immigrants and 4countrymen without remuneration from the Society, until the Conscription Act was passed; but now my term of service has expired.

    The German public of Chicago, a city where fifty thousand Teutons live, should pay more attention to immigration which is the cause of the great and rapid development of the city.

    While Americans annually spend large sums of money for benevolent purposes, as for instance, for orphan homes, homes for the friendless, and homes for the aged, the German Society of Chicago, which has become a refuge for helpless immigrants and needy German citizens, ought not fall asleep; for the German Society of Chicago is the only German organization which aids needy Germans without respect to origin or creed

    If our German citizens would cease helping every beggar and bum who comes to their door or approaches them in the streets, especially in the winter, and would donate corn, flour, meat, potatoes, etc., no Chicago family 5that is worthy of support would have to go hungry.

    The German Society has done much to increase the school attendance of poor children by exercising a "moral" compulsion--by giving shoes and clothing to those poor pupils who attend school regularly.

    We take great pleasure in commending the work done in the Juvenile Home, where German children were always heartily welcomed and well cared for.

    The Home of the Friendless is maintained for the benefit of children of dissolute or criminally inclined parents, or children who are in danger of entering upon a life of crime, and it has proved to be very effective. However the Home of the Friendless is not a suitable place for the children of poor but law-abiding parents; these children should be placed in more pleasant and less dangerous surroundings, so that they are not estranged from their parents and do not fall prey to greedy employers.

    6

    The Home for Workers is in its infancy. It is the most pleasant and most necessary of all branches of charity; for who is more deserving among the needy than the man or woman who is diligent and faithful and would like to work but is prevented from doing so by age and physical disability, and would rather starve than become an inmate of a poorhouse?

    In the Reform School there are proportionately few German boys; and the majority of them have been placed there because of youthful carelessness or indifference on the part of their parents, who either send their boys out to gather old iron and other junk, or permit them to loiter idly about the streets and alleys. In time the lads meet bad companions and finally are confined to reform schools, where they come into contact with confirmed and hardened offenders, and as a result the boys are totally demoralized.

    I hope that the German Society of Chicago endeavors to have juvenile delinquents classified, so that light offenders, first offenders, or those who do not participate in evil deeds, but just accompany the offenders, are not 7placed on the same level with, treated as, and confined with, real criminals, thieves, robbers, murderers, etc., but are kept separate from the latter.

    The inmates of the Reform School should be classified in the following manner: 1) Non-participating observer; 2) Seduced; 3) Corrigible; 4) Incorrigible.

    As in Germany, the societies "for the protection of German emigrants" are expanding their activity, so we also should take greater precautions to protect immigrants in our country.

    In conclusion I wish to emphasize that if the German Society of Chicago is not more alert, the thieves and confidence men in New York and other ports will have a gay time; for the German Society of Chicago and the St. Louis Immigrant Society have done more to prevent swindling than any other organization in the United States. The German Society of Chicago may justly be proud of the fact that it has exposed several attempts to defraud innocent people of large sums of money and valuable property, and has also succeeded 8in locating much valuable baggage.

    If the German immigrants who come to Chicago are left without a source of information or material aid, the city will not only lose its wide-spread reputation for the assistance rendered immigrants, but also will soon be deprived of the valuable services of these people.

    The Chicago Turnverein and the Chicago Arbeiterverein have done much for charitable purposes; however, the great majority of the members of these organizations are of the laboring class; many of them are members of the German Society of Chicago, and their zeal is commendable. Yet it is desirable that those who have wealth--home owners, businessmen, and professional men--take a greater and more active interest in benevolence. And they really are obligated, for they avail themselves of the services of the Society when they need help in their offices, stores, or homes.

    I wish to thank our president, Mr. Heinrich Greenbaum for the valuable 9aid he has given me in my work. He was always willing to assist me whenever difficulties presented themselves, though at times it was necessary that he neglect his business in order to comply with my request.

    I have always tried to be just toward everybody; if I appeared to be unsympathetic in some instances it was only because I wished to discourage people who are not worthy of assistance. There are a great number of beggars who journey from city to city; they are very successful in arousing the sympathy of the public, much more so than worthy applicants for aid. They manage to lead the existence which appeals to them by carefully avoiding any flagrant offense against the laws pertaining to vagrancy. When I refuse to feed or house these lazy persons, they slander the German Society of Chicago. And the public, not knowing that these professional beggars have been driven from some neighboring city by the civil authorities, believes their stories about about inhuman treatment.

    .......[The next paragraph of this article contains a repetition of previously 10expressed thoughts.]

    Respectfully,

    F. Schlund, Agent.

    ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT

    Receipts for 1862 and 1863 $652.07
    Disbursements for 1862 and 1863 246.50
    Balance $405.57

    Heinrich Greenbaum, President.

    May 2, 1863.

    The general meeting of the German Society of Chicago was held in the German House, May 3, 1863, with President Heinrich Greenbaum presiding. The report of Agent Schlund was read ...

    German
    III B 2, III G, III D, II E 3, II E 2, II D 3, II D 5, II D 4, II D 7, II D 8, I B 3 b, I D 1 a, II D 10

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  • Chicago Times -- June 25, 1871
    The German Catholic Orphan Asylum

    The various German Catholic churches of this city have united in an effort to establish an asylum for their homeless little ones. A tract of land has been purchased, but only partially paid for, in the vicinity of Rose Hill, and it is to be hoped that the necessary means to erect a suitable building, as well as pay the balance due on the property, will soon be acquired. The bazaar in its aid, held at the North-side Turner hall, during the past week, was well patronized by the charitably disposed citizens, and it is thought that about $10,000 will be realized therefrom. One of the most remunerative schemes was the voting for a gold-headed cane and for a very valuable set of vestments. Ex-Ald. John Herting, of St. Joseph's church, won the cane, receiving a number of votes largely in excess of his competitors. St. Michael's parish won the vestments. Much credit is due to the ladies who labored so indefatigably for the success of the fair.

    The various German Catholic churches of this city have united in an effort to establish an asylum for their homeless little ones. A tract of land has been purchased, but ...

    German
    II D 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 13, 1875
    Uhlich's Orphanage

    On the Northwest corner of Burlington and Center Streets a nice red building enclosed by a garden attracts the attention of the passerby. On the frontispice can be seen the inscription: Uhlich's Orphan Asylum.

    The orphanage does not owe its inception directly to the man whose name it bears. Mr. Uhlich was the chief contributor to the orphanage. For a long time the members of the Evangelical Lutheran St. Paul's parish, had expressed the desire to build an orphanage. Collections for that purpose were taken up at picnics and several thousand dollars had been collected, when Mr. Carl Uhlich died in 1867 and through his will bequeathed forty-eight lots to the institution. The orphanage was then founded at once. A house was at first rented at the corner of La Salle and Ohio Streets. When this house became too small, the institution was transferred to Clark Street, between Sophia Street and Webster Avenue, where it remained until the great fire. Later, the present building was erected at a cost of $23,000. The lot cost $9,900. The Relief and Aid Society also contributed a considerable sum.

    The institution is completely under the supervision of the First United Lutheran 2Community. This does not imply that only children of Lutheran parents are received in the institution. A number of Catholic children have been admitted and only children who have never been baptised, are baptised according to the Evangelical Lutheran rite.

    We mention all these facts in order to interest our German population in this wonderful institution. In Cincinnati and Baltimore the German orphanages are supported through an annual German picnic. The last one in Cincinnati netted over $8,000. We wonder if it would not be possible to do the same in Chicago.

    On the Northwest corner of Burlington and Center Streets a nice red building enclosed by a garden attracts the attention of the passerby. On the frontispice can be seen the ...

    German
    II D 4, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 25, 1875
    The Orphan's Festival

    "You are coming to the orphan's festival, are'nt you? We shall meet there this afternoon," were the stereotyped words with which acquaintances greeted each other on the streets. "What is going on today?" Americans passing through Clark Street would ask. There are so many people on the street. Something big must be going on. And something big was truly going on. The Germans knew what was the cause for these big crowds - it was the orphan's festival. From everywhere the Germans were coming - from Archer Avenue and Wentworth Avenue, from Halsted Street and Blue Island Avenue, from Milwaukee Avenue and from every street on the Northside. The orphans came around five o'clock accompanied by the matron, Mrs. Rathsfeld. The president of the orphanage, Mr. J. H. Micklke, led them to the stage and made a short address. Pastor Hartmann thanked the people for their great support.

    We hope that yesterday's celebration will become an annual affair. Yesterday's crowd was a proof that the Germans are eager to take care of their orphans and we hope that next year instead of ten thousand, fifty thousand will take part in the orphan's festival.

    "You are coming to the orphan's festival, are'nt you? We shall meet there this afternoon," were the stereotyped words with which acquaintances greeted each other on the streets. "What is ...

    German
    II D 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 10, 1876
    [Odd Fellows to Build Home]

    The German lodges of the "Odd Fellows" intend to build with their own means a home for widows and orphans. Discussions concerning the execution of this praiseworthy project have been going on for some time. A committee was appointed to work out a plan for the raising of funds. This plan is now ready. It will be discussed at a meeting of the representatives of all the Chicago "Odd Fellow Lodges" next Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock in the rooms of the Robert Blum lodge, at the corner of Lake and LaSalle Sts.

    The German lodges of the "Odd Fellows" intend to build with their own means a home for widows and orphans. Discussions concerning the execution of this praiseworthy project have been ...

    German
    II D 4, II D 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 29, 1876
    [Orphans' Benefit]

    An orphans' benefit festival will take place today in Wright's Grove. The well known sympathy of the Germans for orphans will undoubtedly make a success of this celebration. The festival will benefit Uhlich's orphanage, the charitable institution of one of the oldest German settlers. Although the institution is an important one, the interest is not sufficient to cover the current expenses and the debts incurred in rebuilding after the great fire.

    In order to reproduce family life as closely as possible, the children do not wear uniforms. The institution makes no discrimination against any children on account of religious affiliations. Every one should gladly give his support to this institution and we are confident that today's festival will be a success. It would be a sin to stay at home on this beautiful day and so we hope that at least ten thousand will go today to Wright's Grove.

    An orphans' benefit festival will take place today in Wright's Grove. The well known sympathy of the Germans for orphans will undoubtedly make a success of this celebration. The festival ...

    German
    II D 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 18, 1876
    Pastor Joseph Hartmann's Jubilee

    Today, November 18th, Rev. Joseph Hartmann has been pastor of the First German Evangelical Parish of Chicago - St. Paul's Church - for 25 years. Rev. Hartmann was born Sept. 18, 1824, at Bornheim in Bavaria. He received his education in the Gymnasium of Speyer and that of Zweibrucken. He also attended the universities of Bonn and Uztreeht, where he studied philosophy and theology.

    In 1849 he came to America and in the same year he passed his examination before the German Evangelical Synod of North America in Cleveland, Ohio. His first parish was at West Turin in Lewis County, in the state of New York. From there he came to Chicago. His activities here were most successful. Besides his increasingly flourishing parish, he started 2several new German Evangelical parishes. He is also the creator of many Anglo-German parochial schools and thus deserves fullest recognition for the preservation of the German language and German customs in Chicago and in the Northwest.

    His activities as synodal president and as preacher were equally successful. He is also the founder of our German orphanage. After the fire of 1871, it was his driving power which was mainly responsible for the rebuilding of his church and school and of the orphanage.

    Pastor Hartmann has, here in Chicago, baptized 11,562 children, confirmed 2,810 children, married 4,677 couples and given the Last Supper to 37,500 people.

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    During the Civil War he strongly advocated the Union and fought with great ability in the "Hausfreund" published by him in the interests of the preservation of the Union and the Abolition of Slavery.

    On account of what he has done for the Germans and the Republic, Rev. Hartmann has become highly respected and beloved. The church celebration in his honor will take place Sunday in the midst of his parish. But all the Germans from Chicago wish to extend to this highly deserving man their most sincere congratulations!

    Today, November 18th, Rev. Joseph Hartmann has been pastor of the First German Evangelical Parish of Chicago - St. Paul's Church - for 25 years. Rev. Hartmann was born Sept. ...

    German
    IV, III A, II A 1, III C, II D 4, I A 2 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 22, 1877
    The Orphan Celebration

    which took place yesterday, was a great success... When time for delivering addresses drew close, Pastor Hartmann stepped onto the speaker's platform and introduced Mr. Wilhelm Rapp who said: It is indeed no glory for America ot the American communities that they do hardly anything to help the orphans in which they are far behind the monarchistic countries. But at the present time the air is full with all kinds of good intentions, and we hear so much about the duties toward the welfare of the oppressed, so let us hope that the care of poor children will be included in this duty... Most of our orphanages have been established by the benevolent spirit of the United Churches. The German Protestants of Chicago should be praised for the German orphanage; the German Catholics of Chicago have built that lovely orphanage in Rosehill, and the Jewish communities especially the German Jews are the backbone of that excellent orphanage in Cleveland.

    which took place yesterday, was a great success... When time for delivering addresses drew close, Pastor Hartmann stepped onto the speaker's platform and introduced Mr. Wilhelm Rapp who said: It ...

    German
    II D 4, I C, III C, II B 1 c 3
  • Chicago Tribune -- October 12, 1877
    Polish Patriots Second Day of the Convention

    The second day's session of the fifth annual Convention of the Polish Catholic Union of the United States was held yesterday at the corner of Noble and Bradley streets. There were some twenty societies represented by delegates. The Rev. Father L. Moczygemba, of Jeffersonville, Ind., presided, John Barzynski, secretary.

    A committee of three, composed of P. Kiolbassa, the Rev. Kosloski, of La Salle, and the Rev. Joseph Dombrowski, was appointed for the purpose of finding a suitable place in which to establish a Polish Orphan Asylum, and to raise funds among the Polish Societies through the country for that purpose.

    The second day's session of the fifth annual Convention of the Polish Catholic Union of the United States was held yesterday at the corner of Noble and Bradley streets. There ...

    Polish
    III B 4, II D 4, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 12, 1879
    Consider the Orphans

    The annual festival of Uhlich's orphanage is scheduled for today. No other institution is more deserving of German patronage. With the exception of the Catholic Orphanage at Rosehill, Uhlich's institution is the only German orphanage in Chicago, and since children of all creeds are accepted by it, the appellation "German Orphanage" is well justified. In theological matters a sensible course prevails; the children are brought up religiously without resorting to bigotry or stressing any particular dogma.

    The home, which now takes care of sixty or seventy children, has suffered a considerable loss of income in these last years because of the decrease in value of the real estate included in Uhlich's endowment. The support of the Germans of Chicago is therefore urgently needed.

    The fact that the children are entitled to sympathy and aid is apparent to 2every one. It is to be hoped that Ogden's Grove will be crowded today.

    The annual festival of Uhlich's orphanage is scheduled for today. No other institution is more deserving of German patronage. With the exception of the Catholic Orphanage at Rosehill, Uhlich's institution ...

    German
    II D 4