The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 02, 1861
    Report of the Agent for the German Society of Chicago for the Month of March

    Employment furnished for 105
    Free tickets for needy 2
    Tickets at reduced prices 3
    Board and lodging for poor travelers 6
    Furnished medicine and medical attention for 11
    Found lost baggage for 3
    Found relatives or friends for 30
    Help in financial matters for 3
    Wrote letters for 61
    Referred to County for medical aid, or lodging and board 27

    Collected for, and donated to, sick:

    Firewood 31/2 cords
    Various kinds of flour 190 pounds
    2
    Potatoes 31/2 bushels
    Beans 6 quarts
    Barley 5 pounds
    Soup-meat 58 pounds
    Old clothing given to 6
    Used shoes 12 pairs

    Chicago, Illinois, March 31, 1861.

    F. Schlund, Agent.

    <table> <tr> <td>Employment furnished for</td> <td>105</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Free tickets for needy</td> <td>2</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Tickets at reduced prices</td> <td>3</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Board and lodging for poor travelers</td> <td>6</td> </tr> ...

    German
    II D 10, II D 8, II D 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 07, 1861
    Meeting of the German Ladies' Society

    The German Ladies' Society, which was organized for the purpose of furnishing lint, bandages and other materials for dressing wounds, and, above all, the money necessary to buy them, held a meeting [yesterday] at the German House. The attendance was not proportionate to the seriousness which German ladies and girls should show during times of great danger. The three members of the Committee, Mrs. Butz, Mrs. Schneider, and Mrs. Sparschuh waited patiently until 5 o'clock while a few individuals brought donations of lint, bandages, and money. The following contributions have been received to date:

    Collected by Mrs. Butz $37.10
    " " Mrs. Sparschuh 17.42
    " " Mrs. Schlund 10.14
    " " Mrs. Bahe 8.15
    " " Mrs. Bohrmann 4.62
    " " Mrs. Schneider 18.00
    " " Mrs. Gindele 4.00
    2
    Total $99.43

    The time of the next meeting will be published. In the meantime, ladies may leave their packages with Mrs. Butz, 127 North La Salle Street, or with Mrs. Schneider, 110 North Clark Street. German owners of dry goods stores are urgently requested to contribute some pieces of shirting, which is badly needed. The material may be left in the store of C. Vorpahl, 35 La Salle Street, where receipts for donations will be issued.....

    The German Ladies' Society, which was organized for the purpose of furnishing lint, bandages and other materials for dressing wounds, and, above all, the money necessary to buy them, held ...

    German
    III B 2, I G, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 14, 1861
    Thielemann's Company

    Another contingent of cavalry will leave Chicago for the battlefield--a troop just as brave as Schambeck's boys. Although this company, which consists chiefly of experienced cavalrymen, was accepted for service July 2, it must support itself until it has been sworn for service. However, these men have no means of obtaining a living, since they have ceased working. Therefore, the German public, every patriotic citizen of German extraction, is requested to do his share toward the maintenance of these brave men. A "musical evening" has been arranged tonight at North's Theatre for the benefit of Cavalry Company Number Two, of which Captain Thielemann is the leader. We advise that all Germans read the program which appears in the respective advertisement. It offers plenty of entertainment, and the fact that the purpose is a patriotic one should make it doubly enjoyable.

    Another contingent of cavalry will leave Chicago for the battlefield--a troop just as brave as Schambeck's boys. Although this company, which consists chiefly of experienced cavalrymen, was accepted for service ...

    German
    III D, I J, I G, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 07, 1861
    Report of the Agent of the German Society of Chicago for August, 1861 by F. Schlund

    Employment secured for 152
    Relatives or friends located for 18
    Prevented from going astray 5
    Helped in money or check matters 13
    Families provided with lodging 2
    Sick supported 3
    Provided medical aid or medicine for 3
    Attended to correspondence for 57
    Made loans to 2
    Located lost baggage for 4

    The number of immigrants has diminished greatly, especially during the last half of this month. The opposition which the Quebec and Canadian Railroad furnished 2for eastern ports and railroads, by lowering the rates for immigrants, has had a favorable outcome in that the Erie Railroad has reduced its fare from $11 to $9.50, and the Pennsylvania Railroad from $11 to $9.35. Had these two Railroads put these prices into effect at the beginning of the present immigration season, the poor immigrants would have saved thousands of dollars. They would not have sailed for Canadian ports, and would have encouraged others to come directly to America. It appears that the railroads are not aware of the importance of immigration; and for that reason I have taken the liberty of using the American as well as the European press to explain how the transportation systems here and abroad may benefit by granting emigrants and immigrants reason able passage rates. And my first attempt was crowned with success; within the last two months the fare from New York to Chicago has been reduced by $2.50. I have reason to believe that all German societies in America will co-operate with me. Therefore, in due time, I shall inform people in Europe about the differences in the rates of various American railroads, and I shall make note of the way immigrants are treated by each road, and the amount of baggage each transports free of charge. Delay in the transportation of baggage has two chief 3causes, and may easily be avoided by immigrants. All baggage consigned to western points is transferred at Castle Garden without check, but is recorded. If such baggage arrives at its destination, all is well; but if it is lost, stolen, or mis-sent, then the immigrant has no receipt or other means of recovering it or obtaining its value in cash. Therefore, let no one deliver any kind of baggage to a railroad company which refuses to issue a receipt. When immigrants pay in advance for "overweight" baggage, they receive baggage checks and are thus protected; if anyone has sufficient money to pay for "overweight" baggage at Castle Garden, he should not fail to do so.

    Another matter which annoys many immigrants is the fact that passengers who have previously purchased their railroad tickets in Europe receive very little attention, and this also applies to their baggage; for as most people know, railroad agents are paid a commission on the tickets they sell. Although there is a great deal of hard work connected with the handling of baggage, the agents who must do this work do not receive a penny of pay for it; these conditions are similar to those which prevail in German cafes and saloons where the employees 4are dependent upon the tips which patrons give them.

    It is regrettable that the Chicago and Milwaukee Railroad Company does not take directly to their destination passengers who arrive here during the evening en route to Milwaukee. The present arrangement does not permit them to complete their trip until the next morning, and then via freight train. When passengers arrive on Saturday evening they are forced either to remain here two nights or change their tickets at a cost of $1.30.

    Immigrants who are not bound for Milwaukee, but for other points in Wisconsin, can proceed to their destination at once, since the Northwestern Railroad has not discontinued its night service to the North. Consequently, as soon as trains arrive from the east, the passengers who wish to reach some city or town in Wisconsin can continue their journey without interruption, loss of time, or added cost. It is very difficult to understand why the Chicago and Milwaukee road have made such undesirable arrangements. Or does that Company believe that it can improve the business of the Milwaukee Grand Haven Line by forcing 5upon immigrants the choice of either traveling to Milwaukee via Grand Haven, Michigan or paying an extra fare of $1.30 to get to Milwaukee on the same night of their arrival in Chicago? If that is the Company's idea, it will find that it is mistaken; for.there is more than one way to get to Wisconsin.

    <table> <tr> <td>Employment secured for</td> <td>152</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Relatives or friends located for</td> <td>18</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Prevented from going astray</td> <td>5</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Helped in money or check matters</td> <td>13</td> ...

    German
    III H, II D 8, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 14, 1861
    Semiannual Report of the German Society of Chicago

    Report Dated October 1, 1861, Submitted by F. Schlund, Agent

    Employment secured for 1037
    Reduced fares for poor 10
    Passes for poor immigrants 22
    Lodgings for homeless 7
    Located friends or relatives for 130
    Kept from straying 37
    Assisted in money or check matters 68
    Families lodged 17
    Medical aid or medicine furnished for 16
    Assisted with correspondence 301
    Loans 5
    Located baggage for 35
    Forwarded baggage to destination for 52
    Furnished groceries for 20
    Total 1757

    Report Dated October 1, 1861, Submitted by F. Schlund, Agent <table> <tr> <td>Employment secured for</td> <td>1037</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Reduced fares for poor</td> <td>10</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Passes for poor immigrants</td> <td>22</td> ...

    German
    II D 10, III G, II D 3, II D 6, II D 8
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 22, 1861
    In Behalf of Hecker's Regiment

    The Chicago Turngemeinde gave an entertainment last Saturday at 8 P. M., in Kinzie Hall, for the benefit of the Ladies Aid Society of Chicago. The latter organization wishes to furnish Hecker's Regiment with bandages and other indispensible articles. The entertainment was not only a social success, but its results also showed the popularity of the performances of the Chicago Turngemeinde, and the extent of our German population's love and esteem for the Regiment which is led by brave Hecker, the idol of German Republican youths.

    According to the published report, the receipts for admission were $42.50, and the receipts at the bar, $74.50. Total disbursements were $63.55. The German newspapers advertised the entertainment free of charge.

    We would like to announce that ladies who wish to employ their dainty hands in promoting the health and comfort of our brave German soldiers may 2obtain materials from Mrs. Caspar Butz, 127 La Salle Street, or from Mrs. Georg Schneider, 110 North Clark Street.

    The Chicago Turngemeinde gave an entertainment last Saturday at 8 P. M., in Kinzie Hall, for the benefit of the Ladies Aid Society of Chicago. The latter organization wishes to ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, III D, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 06, 1861
    The Chicago Arbeiterverein and Hecker's Regiment

    The Chicago Arbeiterverein is always ready to defend the freedom or the honor of the German name and to aid some worthy charity. Last Sunday evening the Verein sponsored an entertainment for the benefit of the shamefully neglected soldiers of General Hecker's regiment. At the opening of the entertainment, Mr. Theodor Hielscher, a teacher, made a very appropriate address. The rest of the program consisted of readings and vocal and instrumental musical selections. The song rendered by Mrs. Lauterbach deserves special recognition and was enthusiastically applauded.

    When we state in conclusion that the assembly acknowledged the educational progress which the Arbeiterverein has made, we merely repeat what we have stated before. In the business meeting of the Chicago Arbeiterverein, held last Monday, a committee was appointed to deliver the proceeds of the entertainment--fifty dollars--to the Ladies' Aid Society. The following letter, dated November 4, 1861, is proof that this committee performed its duty:

    2

    "To Messrs. Kersten, Brentano, and Schoenemann, Members of the Committee of the Chicago Arbeiterverein:

    "Acknowledging receipt of $50, the proceeds from the entertainment given by the Chicago Arbeiterverein last Sunday evening, I thank you in the name of the soldiers of General Hecker's regiment, for whose benefit the money is to be used. This generous evidence of your sympathy for the cause of freedom and for the suffering and privations of our brave fighters will not be forgotten. The Ladies' Aid Society is very grateful to you for your contribution, and you may rest assured that the money will be used for the purpose for which it is intended.

    "In the name of the Ladies' Aid Society,

    Julie Butz."

    The Chicago Arbeiterverein is always ready to defend the freedom or the honor of the German name and to aid some worthy charity. Last Sunday evening the Verein sponsored an ...

    German
    II D 10, III D, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 06, 1861
    Report of the Agent of the German Society of Chicago

    Report for Month of October

    Employment obtained for 117
    Passes for poor immigrants 2
    Located relatives or funds for 20
    Located baggage for 13
    Corresponded for 36
    Assisted in financial matters 12
    Families lodged 3
    Sick families provided with food 6
    Lodged for one night 1
    Provided medical care and medicine for 4
    Total 214
    2

    Report for Month of November

    Employment obtained for 95
    Located relatives or friends for 12
    Located baggage for 10
    Corresponded for 42
    Assisted in financial matters 14
    Sick aided 8
    Provided medical care and medicine for 5
    Total 186

    (On account of illness the agent was not able to compile and publish the report for October in due time.)

    Although immigration has decreased greatly during the past month, after the arrival of each ship a number of immigrants have come to Chicago from New York and an occasional few from Baltimore.

    3

    During the winter months there is a strong demand in rural districts for laborers at a salary of from eight to ten dollars per month; however the supply is not sufficient to meet this rural demand, although many workers vainly seek employment in the city, and continue their fruitless quest until they have spent their last dollar. There is always ample opportunity for employment for girls, and the wages paid are high. Since winter weather has made shipping impractical, many workers, some of them very able men who worked in the sawmills of Michigan, have returned here; they complain that promises with reference to wages were not kept, that it was difficult to collect wages, and that prices of food and clothing are abnormally high; they recommend that only strong men accustomed to hard work apply for work at the mills, and that they demand a written contract. A written contract and (at the final accounting) a note signed by a responsible employer would protect many workers and their families against losses. This advice is also good for workers who hire themselves to the first available farmer, and it would be profitable for the latter to bind workers to serve for the duration of the harvest, by demanding that they sign a written agreement to that affect--after the usual month's 4probational work.

    Winter weather having set in very early, some needy people come to the German House every day to ask for help; although Chicago has remained one of the most prosperous cities of the country despite the unfortunate conditions which generally prevail during these trying times.

    The first charitable offerings arrived at this office last week: two barrels of flour from a German merchant, and one dollar from a woman who does not wish to have her name mentioned. In this connection I wish to ask that the German citizens of Chicago continue to contribute to the support of the sick and the needy. Your agent will follow his custom of thoroughly investigating each case; and though some heartless people claim that the deserving poor are denied help, please do not believe them, for such statements are usually made by persons who have never done anything to alleviate the misery of unfortunates, and never will; they advance such claims merely as an excuse for not assisting in this cause. Where is there even one worthy person who can truthfully say 5that your agent refused to help him? Very often these suspicious statements come from people who provide vagabonds with letters of recommendations, and make strenuous efforts to secure aid for bums who have been driven out of nearby cities. I can cite many instances in proof of my statement.

    The agent is in his office every morning from 9 to 12 A.M., and will be glad to accept gifts and donations. The public may be assured that these will be used only to administer to the needs of deserving persons.

    Report for Month of October <table> <tr> <td>Employment obtained for</td> <td>117</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Passes for poor immigrants</td> <td>2</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Located relatives or funds for</td> <td>20</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Located baggage ...

    German
    II D 10, III G, II D 3, II D 8
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 23, 1862
    Report on Annual Ball of the German Society of Chicago

    Receipts

    Sale of tickets $214.00
    Lottery tickets 37.75
    Refreshments 111.40
    Donations 1.50
    Total $364.65

    Disbursements

    Music $ 25.00
    Hall 8.00
    Printing 6.50
    Miscellaneous 2.00
    2
    Counterfeit $ 3.00
    Total 44.50
    Net Proceeds $319.85

    In the name of the needy who receive help from the German Society of Chicago I heartily thank all who participated in this ball. The work of the magnaminous, sympathetic ladies whose efforts made the ball a success is hereby gratefully acknowledged. Some of them were more successful than others in selling tickets, nevertheless all of them deserve honorable mention. I am particularly grateful to Miss Grommes who handled the sale of lottery tickets; also to Mr. Huck, Bush and Brand, Hiller, Fischer and Lehmann, Wilhelh Gottfried and Schoenhoefer, Bier-John, and Siebert for their generous donations of beer.

    As usual, the press gave us their splendid support.

    3

    Later we shall have more to say about the German Society of Chicago and its benevolent activity.

    Henry Greenbaum, President.

    Receipts <table> <tr> <td>Sale of tickets</td> <td>$214.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Lottery tickets</td> <td>37.75</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Refreshments</td> <td>111.40</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Donations</td> <td>1.50</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Total</td> <td>$364.65</td> </tr> </table> Disbursements <table> <tr> <td>Music</td> ...

    German
    III B 2, II A 2, II D 10, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 18, 1862
    Concert for German Unionists Who Were Driven Out of Missouri

    The Freie Saengerbund (Liberty Chorus) has the honor of being the first organization to act in behalf of our countrymen who were driven out of Missouri. Last Thursday's issue of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung brought the news that four German families who are true to the Union had arrived in Chicago after having been expelled from Missouri, and hardly had we requested the local German societies to devise ways and means of providing for these unfortunate people--martyrs to the cause of liberty and the Union--when the Saengerbund took steps to arrange for a concert, the proceeds of which were to be devoted to the support of these refugees from Missouri.

    Hans Balatka, director of music, all members of the Light Guard Band, and the orchestra of McVickers Theatre, immediately offered to help the Saengerbund; the Board of Management of the German House furnished the hall gratis, the German newspapers donated the necessary advertising space, the German brewers and 2and wine merchants sent beer and wine, and German grocers contributed coffee, sugar, and milk.

    The brewers mentioned were Lill and Diversey, John Huck, Schott and Metz, Busch and Brand, Ludwick and Martin, Seip and Lehmann, Mueller Brothers, and Siebert and Schmidt. Wine merchants who contributed were: Baer, Koeffler, Suess, and Kronfuss. Grocers named were: Arnold Breuer and the Kirchhoff Brothers. Milkman: Schaub.

    While Mrs. Puetz, Mrs. Adolf Mueller, and Miss Therese Diehl served coffee and refreshments, the well-known host, his brother, the former mayor of Guttenberg, Mr. Georg Diehl, and Mr. John Mayer were kept busy at the bar.

    Although there was very little time to make and carry out arrangements, and though the weather invited outdoor activity, the Hall was filled to capacity by the elite of our German citizens. It was a great satisfaction for those present to note that the first call to aid oppressed citizens was answered both 3by those who were willing to give of their art and their talents, and by those who had their pocketbooks wide open.

    The success was unexpected under prevailing conditions. A total of $119.54 was given to the families who were driven out of Missouri.

    It is reported that other organizations are now making arrangements to outdo the Saengerbund. We say: Full steam ahead!

    The Freie Saengerbund (Liberty Chorus) has the honor of being the first organization to act in behalf of our countrymen who were driven out of Missouri. Last Thursday's issue of ...

    German
    I J, I G, III B 2, II D 10, II A 3 b