The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 26, 1862
    Quarterly Report of the President of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein (Published at the request of the Verein)

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has received a copy. As far as we can judge at this time, the Verein will do well under it. The finances of the Verein are in good condition. The library of the Verein has been enlarged considerably, and the members have contributed their share to charity. It is hardly necessary to remind the members that the Verein is obligated to participate in every good work. Thus far, the organization has a good record in this respect.

    The following contributions were made for benevolent purposes during the past six months:

    2

    For Hecker's Regiment.....................$ 50.00

    For the wives of Union soldiers.......... 205.00

    For sick and wounded soldiers............ 50.00

    Total.........................................$305.00

    I thank the members and friends of the Verein who have assisted in obtaining these contributions.

    Disbursements for Library

    For periodicals:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...........$ 35.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862................... 37.00

    Total.....................................................$ 72.00

    3

    For books and binding:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...$135.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862............. 88.00

    Total.............................................$223.00

    If the library of a society may be considered a barometer of the educational standing of the members, we can view our shelves and cases with great satisfaction, since we have purchased the works of Dickens, Sir Walter Scott, Feuerbach, Hacklaender, Freiligrath, Cooper, Auerbach, Spindler, etc. The report of the librarian shows that our members are making good use of this source of education.

    The English night school which our Verein maintains for the benefit of the members has been in session regularly throughout the winter, which shows that our members also appreciate this opportunity to acquire knowledge. And the attendance would certainly have been much larger if the school were more 4centrally located, and if many had not been prevented by business, work, etc. from attending the school.

    The Verein also provided for the choral section. The entertainment given for the benefit of our singers netted $47.72, and this sum was turned over to the treasurer with the express understanding that he use the money to purchase music, etc.

    Fortunately, there were not many cases of sickness among the members; we seldom had more than three cases at a time, and there were no deaths.

    Our affiliation with the Peoria Arbeiter-Verein, should it materialize, will be the first step in our endeavor to spread the principles laid down in our constitution. It is desirable that our members who make their homes in other cities try to organize an Arbeiterverein there, using our constitution as a model, so that eventually anyone who leaves Chicago and settles in some other city will find an affiliated society in which he may become a member, and thus continue to 5receive the benefits which he now enjoys as a member of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein.

    Our Sunday evening entertainments have always been very well attended. It would be a great advantage to the members if the committee on lectures could provide for a lecture every two weeks. Besides stimulating the mind and increasing the knowledge of ambitious members and their friends, such lectures would, in my opinion, be the best means of getting rid of the class of people that thinks only of itself and its amusement and gives no thought to the responsibility which the Verein assumes when it arranges for this kind of entertainment. Let no one say that these people are afflicted with boredom only at certain lectures. The fact is that they are bored at every serious lecture. That was proved at the lecture on the death of Lovejoy, a martyr to the cause of liberty. Fortunately, there are only a few who place little value on education, and the sooner these people cease coming to our hall when serious topics are discussed, the better it will be for all concerned. And even if the subject matter is above the mental capacity of some of those who come to the meeting place of the Verein, they ought 6to have manners enough not to disturb those who want to listen, and should show enough respect for the lecturer to be quiet at least while he is speaking.....

    At the last meeting, the members elected a committee which has the duty of obtaining fuel at less than retail cost. I have a recommendation to make in regard to this matter. The Verein has some money in a bank. How about using it to buy fuel at wholesale for the benefit of members, and the treasury of the Verein? If each member should save only fifty cents by buying a ton of coal from the Verein, and the Verein should realize seventy-five cents on the transaction, the member would have a substantial saving, and, with coal at four dollars per ton, the Verein's money would have an earning capacity as follows:

    Net profit on investment $100 $18.75
    " " " " 400 75.00
    " " " " 533 100.00
    7

    That certainly is more than a bank pays, or can pay. And that is but three fifths of the entire profit, since the fifty cents saved by the purchaser must be considered also. Thus, if we would invest the whole of our bank balance ($533), the entire profit would be $100 for the Verein and $66.66 for the members. That would be a gain of 311/4 per cent, and the danger of loss would be eliminated because all transactions would be for cash only. I recommend that the Verein give this matter serious consideration.

    At the end of the last quarter the membership of the Verein was 389, a gain of 49.

    I have the great pleasure of informing you that a much friendlier spirit now prevails in our business meetings. When there is debating, it is done with less bitterness, and without sarcastic references to individuals. Thus the spirit of brotherhood is growing stronger, and as long as it asserts its power, the Verein will flourish.

    Theodor Hielscher,

    President of Chicago Arbeiter-Verein

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has ...

    German
    II D 1, I A 3, II D 10, II B 1 a, II B 2 g, II B 2 f, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 22, 1870
    Report of the Chicago Sick Benefit Association (August 1, 1869 to August 1, 1870)

    Receipts

    Cash in treasury on August 1, 1869....................................................$3,728.92

    Premiums, policies, and admission fees..............................................14,119.31

    For funerals............................................................................... 474.00

    Interest.................................................................................... 274.41

    Drawn from treasury..................................................................... 2,150.08

    Agents' arrearages....................................................................... 1,458.07

    Total....................................................................................... $22,204.79

    Disbursements

    Sick Benefits.............................................................................. $8,311.13

    Dividends.................................................................................. 337.50

    Salaries..................................................................................... 1,723.33

    2

    Revenue stamps, advertisements, etc.........................$3,221.20

    Deposited in treasury............................................. 1,151.33

    Funerals............................................................. 351.00

    Commissions....................................................... 2,577.97

    Total................................................................$17,672.46 (sic)

    Cash in treasury...................................................$2,853.25

    Cash in hands of secretary....................................... 60.30

    Cash in hands of agents........................................... 1,453.07

    Notes................................................................. 160.71

    Total all disbursements.............................................$22,204.79

    Assets

    Cash in treasury......................................................$2,853.25

    Cash in hands of secretary.......................................... 60.30

    Cash in hands of agents.............................................. 1,453.07

    3

    Materials......................................$400.00

    Notes..........................................160.71

    Appliances and books....................... 493.30

    Total...........................................$5,425.63 (sic)

    Liabilities..................................... 242.10

    Total net worth..............................$5,183.53 (sic)

    Membership on August 1, 1869.............1,026

    Received into membership................. 531

    Memberships cancelled...................... 497

    Membership on August 1, 1870.............. 1,060

    Ten hundred and sixty members (among them 21 women) were sick a total of 6,623.7 weeks and received $8,311.13 in sick benefits, averaging $31.36 per person or $12.55 per week, while during the previous year 133 persons were sick 3,404.7 weeks and received $12.79 per week, or $32.76 per person.

    4

    The total benefit payments made to 265 persons over a period of 6,623.7 weeks amounted to $8,311.13. Benefits paid since July 28, 1865 amounted to $12,667.83.

    In accordance with a resolution passed August 14, 1869, rates for new members were increased 15 per cent; the old members pay the original rates. It is in the interest of the Association that all members, old and new, pay the prevailing rates. [Translator's note: This sentence lacks clarity. It was translated verbatim.]

    C. Knobelsdorff, President

    W. Katerbau, Secretary.

    This is to certify that we have compared the above report with the records of the secretary and have found them to agree in every respect.

    Chicago, Illinois, August 18, 1870;

    The Finance Committee:

    William S. Golsen,

    5

    Herrmann Kaestner,

    Louis Blohm.

    Receipts Cash in treasury on August 1, 1869....................................................$3,728.92 Premiums, policies, and admission fees..............................................14,119.31 For funerals............................................................................... 474.00 Interest.................................................................................... 274.41 Drawn from treasury..................................................................... 2,150.08 Agents' arrearages....................................................................... 1,458.07 Total....................................................................................... $22,204.79 Disbursements Sick Benefits..............................................................................

    German
    II D 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 09, 1871
    Meeting of the Council of Superintendents.

    Superintendent Dixon moved the following resolution:-

    Resolved that we express our most sincere thanks to the reception committee of the German peace celebration.

    That we sympathize wholeheartedly with the patriotic spirit of our German fellow-citizens which moved them in honor of the return of peace to the glorious fatherland to organize in a festival which this city has never seen anything more magnificent.

    And that we sincerely hope that in no distant time we will be invited again to celebrate the glorious day when the United States of Germany declare themselves free and independent with a republican form of government, with King William as President, Bismarck as Secretary of State, and the viliant old iron-clad Moltke as Secretary of war! The resolution was adopted unanimously.

    2

    Then the report of the Director of the House of the Poor and Insane was read. The number of inmates on June 1st was 1203. According to nationality there were: 361 Irish, 180 Germans, 133 Americans, 126 Swedes, 67 English, 48 Norwegians, 34 Scotch, 31 Canadians, 25 Danes, 12 Negroes, 8 Bohemians, 7 French, 5 Poles and 5 Welshmen.

    Superintendent Dixon moved the following resolution:- Resolved that we express our most sincere thanks to the reception committee of the German peace celebration. That we sympathize wholeheartedly with the patriotic ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, I C, I G, III H, III A, II D 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 18, 1871
    [The Great Fire]

    The Chicago Workers' Association has resolved immediately to refund to every member and every widow of a member who owns a share ($10 the share for the building of the hall) the amount of the share. It was further resolved to pay the widow of the member Geyerstanger, who died in the fire, $50.

    The Globe Theater which belongs to the Workers' Association, was rented last Monday by Col. Wood, formerly of the Museum, for $10,000 a year. It will be opened by him as soon as possible, with a stock company.

    The Chicago Workers' Association has resolved immediately to refund to every member and every widow of a member who owns a share ($10 the share for the building of the ...

    German
    II D 10, II D 1
  • [Association documents] -- January 28, 1872
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    A communication of U. (nited) H. (ebrew) R. (elief) A. (ssociation) was received and placed on file. It was moved and seconded that the secretary issue an order to U. H. R. A. for each paying member, one dollar.

    A communication of U. (nited) H. (ebrew) R. (elief) A. (ssociation) was received and placed on file. It was moved and seconded that the secretary issue an order to U. ...

    Jewish
    II D 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 12, 1872
    [The Order of the Harugari Celebrates its 25th Anniversary]

    In the whole union the "Order of the Harugari" yesterday celebrated the 25th anniversary of its founding... To the 12 original members in New York, 25,000 have been added...There are 53 subordinate lodges in New York, 59 in Pennsylvania, 20 in New Jersey, 11 in Illinois, 9 in Massachusetts, 19 in Ohio, 12 in Missouri, 11 in Indiana, 10 in Kentucky and so on. In Chicago there are 9 lodges with 598 members.

    The whole order supported during the last quarter century 15,500 brethren with $260,000.00; 2, 198 widows and orphans with $54,943.00 and buried 1, 368 brethren at a cost of $51,720.00. The total capital of the order amounts amounts to $500,125.00. The Chicago member on the Board of the Grand Officials is Grand Chaplain Joseph Heimbrodt...

    The celebration in Chicago took place in the Vorwarts Turn Hall. Every-body appeared with a green oak leaf as a device. The officials and the majority of the members wore resplendent regalia.

    The Grand Marshal and Grand Supervisor introduced the speaker Ex. O. Gr. B. J. Poths.

    2

    Poths reviewed the history of the Order...

    Already on the first Sunday after the conflagation contributions arrived in Chicago, and altogether the Order gave $9,000.00. For the wounded in the Franco-German War the Order also contributed $6,000.00. The speaker then strongly impressed on all present to educate their children in the German spirit and to keep faith with the German tongue...

    In the whole union the "Order of the Harugari" yesterday celebrated the 25th anniversary of its founding... To the 12 original members in New York, 25,000 have been added...There are ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, I G, II D 1, III H, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 01, 1872
    [Anniversary]

    Few benevolent organizations have enjoyed such a rapid development as the Bismarck Society, which now celebrates its first anniversary. Organized to provide sick benefits and life insurance, especially for the poorer class, the society not only has a membership of over one thousand persons, but has also given aid to the organization of similar societies in other parts of the country.

    The anniversary was celebrated last Saturday in the hall of the Aurora Gymnasium, where the reception of delegates from Cincinnati, Detroit, Lexington, Philadelphia, Omaha, Ottawa, Milwaukee, and St. Louis took place.

    Few benevolent organizations have enjoyed such a rapid development as the Bismarck Society, which now celebrates its first anniversary. Organized to provide sick benefits and life insurance, especially for the ...

    German
    II D 1, III B 2
  • Chicago Times -- October 02, 1872
    [Churches Aid the Fire-Stricken]

    The Scandinavians formed a relief society which did considerable work among the fire-stricken Northmen. The several Scandinavian churches united in these charitable labors. Mr. O. C. Birkland being elected president. Assistance was also lent by Rev. Krohn, Rev. C. P. Petersen, and Rev. Z. V. Korgeson. About $2,000 were disbursed. The St. Georges Society confined its labors exclusively to the assistance of its own members. Probably $1,000 or $1,500 were disbursed.

    The Scandinavians formed a relief society which did considerable work among the fire-stricken Northmen. The several Scandinavian churches united in these charitable labors. Mr. O. C. Birkland being elected president. ...

    Danish
    II D 1, II D 1, II D 1
  • Chicago Times -- October 02, 1872
    The Chicago Fire and the German Aid Society

    This society expended during the winter months immediately following the great fire the sum of $64,146.80. The annual report of the society estimates the number of Germans rendered homeless at 50,000. This figure, apparently out of proportion to the population of the city, and those who suffered by the conflagration is probably very nearly correct, since the larger part of out German population inhabited the North Side division, which contained two thirds of the actual sufferers.

    The following gentlemen are the officers of the society: Francis Lackner, President; U. Clausenius, Vice-President; Henry Greenebaum, Treasurer; C. Knobelsdorf, Secretary; Joseph Kaufman, Superintendent.

    The Society during the dark days immediately following the fire, did a noble work and relieved untold sufferning. The officers placed themselves in immediate correspondence with their friends in all parts of the United States and the fatherland, and the following figures show that their appeals were not in vain. The following sums were received as indicated: from Chicago, $3, 384; from other parts of the state, $251.45; from Missouri, $55; from New 2York, $16,559.41; from Iowa, $145; from the District of Columbia, $41.50; from Ohio, $99.85; from Maryland, $552; from Indiana, $30; from Nebraska, $147.60; from Virginina, $44; from New Jersey, $1441.42; from Kansas, $64.25; from Pennsylvania, $234.15; from Delaware, $20; from Louisiana, $5.00; from Wisconsin, $3.00; from Mexico, $557; from Germany, $40,926.75; from France, $100. Besides the sums mentioned, Germany contributed $69,708.49 to the general relief fund.

    The following is the summary of the work one and the relief afforded during the year. Work secured for 282 persons; application for direct money aid, 8,063; permits issued for building material, furniture, etc., so general distributing depets, 15,000; sewing machines and larger sums were distributed through the special committee of the aid society to 1,200; 3,691 persons received cash assistance to the amount of $44,95.21; 1,097 persons received clothing to the value of $7,688; 853 persons received tools to the value of to the value of $3,471; 13 received traveling tickets to the value of $429; 70 received fuel to the value of $716; 7 received the amounts of rent due, $180; 16 received general articles to the value of $54.

    The following sums were expended: medicine, $334; stoves, $60; furniture, 3$31; burial costs, $24; taxes and freight, $72; salaries, $3,819; rent, $328; printing and advertising, $522; bureau material, $32. Further, 19 persons received tools that had been donated to the value of $200; 21 persons received donated furniture to the value of $150; eight received donated meat to the value of $4.00; 300 received donated clothing to the value of $3,000.

    The German society organized to aid immigrants from the fatherland on the inhospitable shores of a strange land, also gave its mite toward alleviating the sufferings of the unfortunate. Their expenditures amounted to about $600, which sum was very judiciously expended, and probably did as much real good as any similar amount paid out during the city's due necessity. The quarters of the society, at present in the Globe Theater Building, will move to the Metropolitan Block in a few weeks. George Schneider acts as president and H. Enders as executive manager.

    This society expended during the winter months immediately following the great fire the sum of $64,146.80. The annual report of the society estimates the number of Germans rendered homeless at ...

    German
    II D 10, II D 1
  • Chicago Times -- October 02, 1872
    [Churches Aid the Fire-Stricken]

    The Scandinavians formed a relief society which did considerable work among the fire-stricken Northmen. The several Scandinavian churches united in these charitable labors. Mr. O. C. Birkland being elected president. Assistance was also lent by Rev. Krohn, Rev. C. P. Petersen, and Rev. Z. V. Korgeson. About $2,000 were disbursed. The St. Georges Society confined its labors exclusively to the assistance of its own members. Probably $1,000 or $1,500 were disbursed.

    The Scandinavians formed a relief society which did considerable work among the fire-stricken Northmen. The several Scandinavian churches united in these charitable labors. Mr. O. C. Birkland being elected president. ...

    Danish
    II D 1, II D 1, II D 1