The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 26, 1861
    The American Turnerbund and the War. (Editorial)

    Although the North American Turnerbund is dead, it was never more alive than it is now. As an entity it has just about entered the final stage of decay; yet its component parts have developed strength and energy as never before, and the strength and energy displayed by the individual parts of the Bund are guarantees that later a larger and stronger national society will be established.

    Nobody need grieve about the dissolution of the defunct Turnerbund, for it had outlived its usefulness and was marked for destruction as long as five years ago. At that time a schism in its ranks wrought damage that was not repaired, despite all efforts of S. R. Wiesner, editor of Turnzeitung, the Society's official organ, to instill new life into the national association. 2When the Turnzeitung collapsed as a result of the April riots in Baltimore, the last hour of the North American Turnerbuad had come.

    It had accomplished much good during the time of its existence, before, as well as after the schism; it had introduced as a permanent branch of education--a branch of which Americans physical education were unaware--not only into German-American circles but those of Anglo-Americans as well. Through the scientific lectures of Schuenemann-Pott, Stallo, and Solger, the Bund had engendered and fostered much mental activity among many of our German-American youths; it had established several good elementary and evening schools, or had caused their established; it had worked hand in hand with singing societies to make a place for German male choruses in America. In political battles it had served as the vanguard of the German-American element for some time; for after having taken a firm stand (through the adoption of the "Buffalo" platform in the fall of 1855) for the principles of the Republican party, which had been organized but a few years before, it soon widened this platform, which originally was directed against the further spreading of slavery, by making 3a strong attack on slavery itself (sic); Through the establishment of rifle clubs the Bund had provided military training for some of its members, and thereby, as we shall see, it had laid the foundation for reorganization. [Translator's note: The author is in error if he means to create the impression that this was the first evidence of the anti-slavery attitude of Americans of German descent. Long before the birth of the Republican party, in fact, nearly a hundred years before the American Declaration of Independence was signed in 1688, German Menonites in Germantown, Pennsylvania, under the leadership of their pastor, the Reverend Daniel Pastorius, publicly protested against slavery as an institution.]

    Indeed, the Turnerbund had a long and honorable existence, but owing to indifference among the members its usefulness was impaired, and its services dwindled more and more. It would require too much time and space to trace all the causes of this indifference; we will mention briefly one of the chief causes, namely, the purely material tendencies which became especially noticeable after Turner saloons were opened in many cities. At that time individual 4Turner organizations actually were nothing but saloonkeepers' and beer speculators' associations; in some instances vain and idle formalism supplanted noble endearers and estranged many older members who had rendered valuable services and were the pillars of the organization.

    However, these bad symptoms began to vanish when the great battle against The Southern Rebels was begun....

    The Turner will see to it that history will relate and praise them for many more and much greater deeds. Even now they merit the distinction of having furnished proportionately more men for the army of the Union than any other association in the United States. Though they were snubbed, ridiculed, and neglected, their ardor for combat did not wave; moreover it grew when difficulties increased, and since Siegel and Willich issued their first warnings, Turner fighters have doubled their efforts.

    It is to be deplored that all Turners serving in the various regiments of 5the Union Army cannot be united into one large Turner corps, or perhaps into two; one could be placed under the command of Siegel, and the other under Willich, for they are both Turners. Perhaps it is better that they are distributed among the various corps, and that, for instance, the Turner rifle men of Cincinnati are operating in the mountains of West Virginia, the Turner rifle men of the State of New York are located at Fort Monroe, those of Philadelphia are in the vicinity of Alexandria, and some Turner of Chicago are serving in the southeastern part of Missouri. Their military efficiency and, we may add, their staunchness, zeal, and endeavor, which have been renewed and increased on the field of battle, and their desire to fight a war for the liberation of men from the bonds of slavery rather than a political war, have been a source of strength and inspiration for the various army corps, especially for the Germans troops. And that Turner are able to operate as larger units is evinced by the services of the New York Turner Regiment.

    Just as German Turners of the North, though they are spread over every part 6of the theatre of war, form in spirit one great brotherhood in arms, so they will form one great association, a regenerated and purified Turnerbund. The best and ablest German men will gladly join that Bund; for it will be their task, not only to resume the noble and elevating work of the old Turnerbund, but also to counteract the moral and physical debility which will follow in the wake of this great struggle, to prevent the atrophy of the good results of this war, and above all, to protect the good which Americans of German descent will reap from the victory of the North against the envy and wiles of nativism.

    Although the North American Turnerbund is dead, it was never more alive than it is now. As an entity it has just about entered the final stage of decay; yet ...

    German
    II B 3, I G, I J, III D, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 11, 1862
    Gymnastic Exhibition and Tableau at Kinzie Hall

    Monday evening a gymnastic exhibition was given at the Turnhalle for the benefit of the refugees from Missouri and the wounded soldiers at Fort Donaldson. We have seen many demonstrations of gymnastic skill in America, but we must confess that the accomplishments of the local Turner are surpassed by those of no other Turngemeinde in our country, not even by those of the famous New York organization. The exercises performed on the horizontal bars, parallel bars, and trapeze, and especially the weight and jumping exhibitions, were most excellent. Turners like Heinrich Malzacher, Emil Giese, Julius Giese, August Ries, Louis Rosenberg, and Robert Lott have no equals in the United States. If these men had competed at the various national exhibitions, the local Turngemeinde would be famous in every part of the nation.

    The plastic section which is tutored by Turner August Weidling deserves special commendation. The marble groups which we were privileged to see are among the best of their kind in America....

    2

    Viewing the exhibition as a whole, we have only one adverse criticism to make, and that is that the program was much too long, requiring four hours--from eight to twelve o'clock--for its execution. Two hours would have been sufficient. The Great Western Band which accompanied the performers contributed much to the success of the exhibition.

    Owing to inclement weather, the attendance left much to be desired. Considering the noble purpose and the excellence of the performance, the committee had a right to expect a much larger turnout. We hear that the Turngemeind contemplates giving similar performances from time to time; and we are convinced that in the future the public will show a greater appreciation for this kind of entertainment. Certainly none of those who were present on Monday evening will be absent from future exhibitions.

    Monday evening a gymnastic exhibition was given at the Turnhalle for the benefit of the refugees from Missouri and the wounded soldiers at Fort Donaldson. We have seen many demonstrations ...

    German
    I J, I G, II B 3, III B 2, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 26, 1863
    [Turngemeinde to Build Gymnasium]

    The Chicago Turngemeinde leased a lot, 101 by 160 feet, on North Clark Street, north of Melm's Garden, for a period of ten years. The lease contains a provision that the Turngemeinde may purchase the property within the specified time. The rental is $500 annually for the first five years, and $600 annually for the last five years. The Turngemeinde intends to erect a gymnasium on the lot, and the members are showing great enthusiasm for the enterprise. The Turner Company of the old Hecker Regiment has already subscribed for $645 worth of stock and sent the money in cash, promising to purchase more shares later.

    The building committee is very active and will immediately take all steps necessary to get construction under way, since the building is to be ready for use before winter.

    The Chicago Turngemeinde leased a lot, 101 by 160 feet, on North Clark Street, north of Melm's Garden, for a period of ten years. The lease contains a provision that ...

    German
    II B 3, II F
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 22, 1863
    Lay Corner Stone of New Turnhalle

    At ten o'clock yesterday morning, the members of the Chicago Turngemeinde marched in solemn procession from their old hall on Kinzie Street to the site of their new building. The Great Western Band led the procession and was followed by the pupils.of the Turnhalle and the turners, both groups attired in their uniforms. A large crowd accompanied the procession and gathered about the turners when the site was reached. A tin box containing a copy of the German newspapers published in Chicago as well as a copy of the Chicago Tribune and the Evening Journal, several issues of the Turnzeitung, a copy of the minutes of the last meeting of the turners, the last monthly report of the Turngemeinde, a membership list of the Turngemeinde and its pupils, a list of members of the Turner Company of the old Hecker Regiment, a list of turners who died in the service of the United States in the present war, a copy of the Baltimore Wecker in which Washington's Farewell Address appeared, and various coins, were all placed in the cornerstone.

    2

    After the Great Western Band had played a patriotic selection, Mr. Wilhelm Rapp made a brief address to the turners, reminding them of the duties they assumed when they decided to erect a new Turnhalle, and also of their obligations to the other German residents of Chicago, who had wholeheartedly and generously supported the enterprise. He pointed out that it is their duty not only to engage in physical exercise and thus keep in good physical condition, but also to develop their minds, to grow in knowledge, thus making the new Turnhalle a nursery of physical strength as well as a temple of noble intellectual attainments, of ardent love toward our country and its freedom and toward their German fellow citizens of Chicago, in whose interest a heroic company of local turners had fought for two years.

    Thereupon the ceremony of laying the cornerstone was performed by Mr. Baetz assisted by Mr. Hein. A patriotic march rendered by the Great Western Band concluded the program.

    3

    Thus the cornerstone of the principal pillar of the new Turnhalle has been laid, and the outer walls are rising at a rapid pace. Let us hope that the work will be finished in due time without injury to any of the workers employed in the construction of the building. We are certain that the Germans of Chicago will continue to support this noble undertaking, for the Chicago Turngemeinde has always shown, by word and deed, that it is a patriotic, civic-minded, and charitable organization.

    At ten o'clock yesterday morning, the members of the Chicago Turngemeinde marched in solemn procession from their old hall on Kinzie Street to the site of their new building. The ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1864
    Dedication of the Turnhalle

    Yesterday's opening of the new Turnhalle was one of the most joyful events in the history of the Garden City. Before describing the dedicatory ceremonies to our readers, we shall depict the building. The facade is built in the neo-Italian style and presents a pretty picture in its festive decorations. At the peak of the facade, the American flag waves proudly, symbolizing the patriotism of those good sons of Germany who will make the Turnhalle the scene of much future social and intellectual activity.

    We shall try to acquaint our readers with this building, which is so arranged that it will adequately meet all the demands for which it has been erected.

    The building site, which has been leased for a period of ten years, is 101 by 160 feet, and is conveniently located, being readily accessible by streetcar from the north and the south. In accordance with the plan of the architect, 2Mr. H. Rehwoldt, the building covers only a part of the plot, eaving sufficient room for open-air gymnastics. Mr. Paesch supervised the masonry work, and Mr. Schmidt and Mr. Katz were the carpenter contractors.

    The Halle is a two-story building of solid frame construction. The foundation is of stone. The structure is about 50 feet high, 73 feet wide, and 142 feet long. The first floor contains a spacious vestibule, from which a ten-foot stairway leads to the second story: There is a billiard room, 30 by 24 feet, on the first floor; also a club-room, 30 by 24 feet, with door to the street; and a long bar for the refreshment of thirsty souls. The basement contains the gymnasium, which is 70 by 65 by 24 feet, with an area of nearly 5,000 square feet. Here we find various types of apparatus for exercise. On the left side of the building, there is a reading room, a dining room, and a bedroom for the caretaker.

    The dance hall occupies most of the second story. The devotees of Terpsichore 3will have an area of 7,700 square feet to practice their art. Thus the dance hall is one of the largest in Chicago, equalling the space in Bryan's Hall and having many advantages which other halls do not offer. To prevent any danger in an emergency, the dance hall is provided with fine wide doors, and the large stairway is accessible from two directions. Two stairways lead to the lower floor and basement where they are connected with outside doors, and there is a special stairway from the stage to the gymnasium. A special room, 20 by 22 feet, containing a wardrobe, wash stand, and toilet, has been provided for the comfort and convenience of the ladies. A room with like conveniences has been furnished for the men.

    Two stairways lead from the vestibule of the second floor to the galleries, which are located on each side of the dance hall. Two rooms have been arranged on the second floor for the general comfort of the dancers. These rooms are furnished with card tables, and, no doubt, will be the scene of many card parties.

    4

    Two large heating plants have been built in the basement and will supply the whole building with the necessary warmth. A kitchen has been arranged immediately under the dining room, and a dumb waiter has been installed for the convenience of cooks and waiters. The basement also contains a large beer cellar and toilets. Mr. Becker did all the tinwork, Mr. Lampatner furnished the gas appliances, Williams & Wiseman did the glazing and decorating, and Mr. Lester installed the heating equipment; and, in the opinion of experts, these men did their work very well.

    Mr. John W. Doehler furnished the decorations for the dedication. The stage was graced by a bust of Father Jahn, the founder of German gymnastics. His likeness reminds one of the days when the turner movement was in its infancy, and the memory furnishes a delightful contract between those dreary days and the present. The members of the Turngemeinde formed a semicircle on the stage, above which places were reserved for officials, speakers, the building committee, and reporters.

    5

    At 3:30 P. M., Mr. August Becker gave the keys of the Turnhalle to the representative of the building committee, Mr. Huhn, who in turn handed them to the chairman of the executive board. Thereupon, Mr. B. Wiedinger, the president of the Turngemeinde, thanked all the men who had participated in the erection of the new building. Addresses were made by Mrs. Kenkel, Wilhelm Rapp, and Mr. Foellger.

    In the evening a concert was given. The program was very good, and delighted the assembly. Festivities will be concluded tomorrow evening with a grand ball.

    Yesterday's opening of the new Turnhalle was one of the most joyful events in the history of the Garden City. Before describing the dedicatory ceremonies to our readers, we shall ...

    German
    II B 3, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 06, 1866
    Gymnastics in Public Schools

    In the meeting which the School Board held last evening, Inspector Brentano read a proposal of the Chicago Turn Gemeinde, requesting that gymnastics be included in the regular schedule of all public high schools, and that teachers be engaged to instruct the children in that branch of physical education. The proposal was unanimously adopted, and the Executive Board was instructed to take all necessary measures.

    In the meeting which the School Board held last evening, Inspector Brentano read a proposal of the Chicago Turn Gemeinde, requesting that gymnastics be included in the regular schedule of ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 3, I A 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 11, 1867
    Aurora Turnverein Lays Cornerstone of New Turnhalle

    The Aurora Turnvergin laid the cornerstone yesterday for its new Turnhalle which is being erected at Second Street and Milwaukee Avenue. At ten o'clock, members of the Verein, together with representatives from the West Side Arbeiterverein, gathered at the Court House, where the Chicago Turngemeinde, the Union Turnverein, and delegates from the Schuetzenverein and the Concordia Maennerchor had already assembled. At half past ten, this large throng marched to the scene of the festivities, led by the marshals of the day. The speakers, Mr. E. Juessen and General H. Davis, and several members of the City Council and the press followed in carriages.

    The program was opened by a prologue written by Mr. von Langen, and rendered by Miss Virginia von Horn. Turner von Langen then introduced 2the first speaker, Mr. E. Juessen. He addressed the assembly in German and said in part:

    "I feel at home wherever turners erect a temple, for I know that they dedicate and devote their churches only to the cause of freedom and progress. Every new Turnhalle that we build, every new temple that we complete in which the portrait of vigorous old Jahn [founder of the turner movement] is the only revered image, is a barrier against narrow-minded ideas, and a fortress of progress. Turners are welcomed by all but bigots and fanatics. The German turners did their duty in the War of the Rebellion: They did not hesitate to rally around the flag of freedom. They bravely faced the enemy in hard battle and fought for the great ideal which they advocated so enthusiastically. They gladly risked their lives, and that is why every patriot respects the white jacket today. [Translator's note: The turners wore white jackets.]

    "Why are Americans, why are the officials of this city participating in this 3celebration? Because every liberal-minded American is convinced that the spirit which your organizations have shown throughout the length and breadth of the land is in agreement with the fundamental principles of the Constitution of the United States; because they know that Jahn's students never ally themselves with slavery and darkness, but are devotees of freedom and light. Progressive men look forward to your energetic assistance in the future, for the battle is not yet ended. We are still fighting for liberty, equality, and justice. The scene of the contest has merely shifted from the battlefield to the political arena, and words have taken the place of cannon, sword, and musket as means of warfare. And in this new war our American friends are depending on us turners who were their best and ablest comrades-in-arms.

    "You, my friends, have another task. I need only mention it to bring the gleam of battle to your eyes. It is the fight against the bigotry of 4some would-be Americans. An attempt is being made to legislate you into heaven, to prescribe to you not only what you are to drink in order to quench your thirst, but also the only way you are to be translated from this role of tears to heavenly bliss. As a rule, these morbid spells end in revivals and camp meetings, and have but one result--the price for church pews rises. But this time the agitation is more widespread, for even the superintendent of public instruction has proposed strict religious regulations for our public schools. We know from experience what a terrible condition results from combining church and state, and we shall never tolerate even the slightest attempt to abolish or restrict the complete separation of 'the things that are God's and the things that are Caesar's'.

    "I would like to make a practical application of an oft-discussed principle to the temperance issue. Do not vote for any candidate, no matter what his political faith may be, unless he positively and unreservedly declares that he will oppose with every legal means at his disposal the enactment of all 5temperance and Sunday laws. It is desirable that we co-operate with the liberal American element in order to attain our objective. In this way, we can fight bigotry effectively and assert our German national view of life. We count on you turners to form the advance guard in this battle for unrestricted personal liberty, for you have made yourselves the champions of true progress...." [Translator's note: The concluding paragraph of this address is irrelevant. The same is true of the speech made by Mr. Davis, who was not a German.]

    The Aurora Turnvergin laid the cornerstone yesterday for its new Turnhalle which is being erected at Second Street and Milwaukee Avenue. At ten o'clock, members of the Verein, together with ...

    German
    III B 2, III D, I B 2, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1871
    [The Turners Establish a School]

    The Chicago Turn-Gemeinde announces the opening of a Sunday School of 2 semesters beginning January 1st, and July 1st. Children to pay $2.00, adults $4.00 per semester. For members of the Turn-gemeinde free of charge. Instruction is in German, every Sunday morning, in the Turn-Halle(Gymnasium) on the Northside.

    Subjects to be taught: 1 Drawing, 2 Kalegraphy, 3 Arithmetic, 4 Geometry, 5 Rethoric and stylistic, 6 fundaments of music.

    The Chicago Turn-Gemeinde announces the opening of a Sunday School of 2 semesters beginning January 1st, and July 1st. Children to pay $2.00, adults $4.00 per semester. For members of ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1871
    [The Turner Community Sunday School]

    Report of the actual opening of the Sunday School of the Turngemeinde. The first speaker of the Turngemeinde, Carl Lotz, addressed almost a hundred prospective students and 40 representatives of all the Turnvereine of Illinois.

    Report of the actual opening of the Sunday School of the Turngemeinde. The first speaker of the Turngemeinde, Carl Lotz, addressed almost a hundred prospective students and 40 representatives of ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 10, 1871
    [The Sharpshooters]

    The Sharpshooters Association (Schutzenverein) has rented two adjacent shops in the German House (entrance from Indiana Street). The one has been made the club restaurant, the other contains two shooting stands and it is open on Sundays and Wednesdays for sharpshooters and their guests. It is the intention of the Association to keep this place permanently, use it in the summer during bad weather and make it general headquarters.--The Sharpshooters Association can congratulate itself for its progress and flourishing, because it is not only free of debts but even owns considerable property.

    The Sharpshooters Association (Schutzenverein) has rented two adjacent shops in the German House (entrance from Indiana Street). The one has been made the club restaurant, the other contains two shooting ...

    German
    II B 3