The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 26, 1862
    Quarterly Report of the President of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein (Published at the request of the Verein)

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has received a copy. As far as we can judge at this time, the Verein will do well under it. The finances of the Verein are in good condition. The library of the Verein has been enlarged considerably, and the members have contributed their share to charity. It is hardly necessary to remind the members that the Verein is obligated to participate in every good work. Thus far, the organization has a good record in this respect.

    The following contributions were made for benevolent purposes during the past six months:

    2

    For Hecker's Regiment.....................$ 50.00

    For the wives of Union soldiers.......... 205.00

    For sick and wounded soldiers............ 50.00

    Total.........................................$305.00

    I thank the members and friends of the Verein who have assisted in obtaining these contributions.

    Disbursements for Library

    For periodicals:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...........$ 35.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862................... 37.00

    Total.....................................................$ 72.00

    3

    For books and binding:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...$135.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862............. 88.00

    Total.............................................$223.00

    If the library of a society may be considered a barometer of the educational standing of the members, we can view our shelves and cases with great satisfaction, since we have purchased the works of Dickens, Sir Walter Scott, Feuerbach, Hacklaender, Freiligrath, Cooper, Auerbach, Spindler, etc. The report of the librarian shows that our members are making good use of this source of education.

    The English night school which our Verein maintains for the benefit of the members has been in session regularly throughout the winter, which shows that our members also appreciate this opportunity to acquire knowledge. And the attendance would certainly have been much larger if the school were more 4centrally located, and if many had not been prevented by business, work, etc. from attending the school.

    The Verein also provided for the choral section. The entertainment given for the benefit of our singers netted $47.72, and this sum was turned over to the treasurer with the express understanding that he use the money to purchase music, etc.

    Fortunately, there were not many cases of sickness among the members; we seldom had more than three cases at a time, and there were no deaths.

    Our affiliation with the Peoria Arbeiter-Verein, should it materialize, will be the first step in our endeavor to spread the principles laid down in our constitution. It is desirable that our members who make their homes in other cities try to organize an Arbeiterverein there, using our constitution as a model, so that eventually anyone who leaves Chicago and settles in some other city will find an affiliated society in which he may become a member, and thus continue to 5receive the benefits which he now enjoys as a member of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein.

    Our Sunday evening entertainments have always been very well attended. It would be a great advantage to the members if the committee on lectures could provide for a lecture every two weeks. Besides stimulating the mind and increasing the knowledge of ambitious members and their friends, such lectures would, in my opinion, be the best means of getting rid of the class of people that thinks only of itself and its amusement and gives no thought to the responsibility which the Verein assumes when it arranges for this kind of entertainment. Let no one say that these people are afflicted with boredom only at certain lectures. The fact is that they are bored at every serious lecture. That was proved at the lecture on the death of Lovejoy, a martyr to the cause of liberty. Fortunately, there are only a few who place little value on education, and the sooner these people cease coming to our hall when serious topics are discussed, the better it will be for all concerned. And even if the subject matter is above the mental capacity of some of those who come to the meeting place of the Verein, they ought 6to have manners enough not to disturb those who want to listen, and should show enough respect for the lecturer to be quiet at least while he is speaking.....

    At the last meeting, the members elected a committee which has the duty of obtaining fuel at less than retail cost. I have a recommendation to make in regard to this matter. The Verein has some money in a bank. How about using it to buy fuel at wholesale for the benefit of members, and the treasury of the Verein? If each member should save only fifty cents by buying a ton of coal from the Verein, and the Verein should realize seventy-five cents on the transaction, the member would have a substantial saving, and, with coal at four dollars per ton, the Verein's money would have an earning capacity as follows:

    Net profit on investment $100 $18.75
    " " " " 400 75.00
    " " " " 533 100.00
    7

    That certainly is more than a bank pays, or can pay. And that is but three fifths of the entire profit, since the fifty cents saved by the purchaser must be considered also. Thus, if we would invest the whole of our bank balance ($533), the entire profit would be $100 for the Verein and $66.66 for the members. That would be a gain of 311/4 per cent, and the danger of loss would be eliminated because all transactions would be for cash only. I recommend that the Verein give this matter serious consideration.

    At the end of the last quarter the membership of the Verein was 389, a gain of 49.

    I have the great pleasure of informing you that a much friendlier spirit now prevails in our business meetings. When there is debating, it is done with less bitterness, and without sarcastic references to individuals. Thus the spirit of brotherhood is growing stronger, and as long as it asserts its power, the Verein will flourish.

    Theodor Hielscher,

    President of Chicago Arbeiter-Verein

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has ...

    German
    II D 1, I A 3, II D 10, II B 1 a, II B 2 g, II B 2 f, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 10, 1863
    The Chicago Arbeiterverein Third Quarterly Report of the President

    I take great pleasure in submitting my quarterly report; and I wish to congratulate the members upon the favorable standing of the society. Not only has the membership greatly increased and the fund for widows and orphans received sufficient contributions to put it on a sound basis, but also the state of health of the members, the progress made during the past months, and the general financial condition of our organization have been extremely gratifying.

    In regard to the financial report, I wish to call your attention to the fact that our financial condition ought to be of great interest to every member who has the welfare of the Arbeiterverein at heart; and each one must derive great satisfaction from the improved condition of our treasury. During my term of office it has been my constant object to observe the utmost 2economy in making expenditures.

    The funds of the society have been augmented, especially through payments to the treasury for widows and orphans, as may be seen from the report of the treasurer. Although under normal conditions we could have expected an increase in our net income, since we now have a larger number of members, our treasury balance is no greater than usual, because we were forced to assume greater obligations toward some of our members and also toward nonmembers. The greater part of our income was used to relieve the distress of widows, orphans, and dependents of soldiers. I take great pride in stating that the society has always shown a true spirit of benevolence, and has done much to make life more endurable for the poor and helpless. It has never permitted economy to restrict its charitable activity. And the general public has rendered valuable aid.

    During the past quarter the membership has risen to 935; 110 new members 3were added to our roll, and 33 were stricken from the membership list for nonpayment of dues. While this information gives us cause to rejoice, we should exercise greater care in the future when accepting members, since quite a few of those who were lately admitted to membership have not met their obligations, and joined merely for sake of the aid which our members receive.

    Financial Report

    Balance, February 23, 1863 $1,352.30
    Balance, May 22, 1863 2,391.12
    Quarterly receipts for dues, etc 1,810.65
    Special contributions 908.13
    Total $2,718.78
    Quarterly disbursements 1,679.96
    Balance $1,038.82
    4
    Sick benefits paid $219.00
    For support of dependents of soldiers 77.00
    For support of dependents of poor 42.00
    Funeral expenses 42.50
    For nurse 6.75
    Current expenses 1,288.71
    Total $1,675.96

    Widow and Orphan Fund

    Balance February 22, 1863 $151.00
    Payments up to March 31 824.00
    Monthly dues 288.59
    Contributions 77.00
    Total $1,340.59
    5
    Disbursements 28.25
    Balance $1,282.25 (sic)
    Deposited in bank 2,217.25
    In treasury 173.77
    Total $2,702.06 (sic)

    Recapitulation

    Total receipts $2,718.78
    Total disbursements 1,670.96
    Balance $1,037.82

    Widows and Orphans Fund

    6
    Receipts, February 22 to May 22 $1,301.50
    Disbursements 28.25
    Balance $1,273.25

    Since the available money of the society was used for charitable purposes, little could be done for our library, which was used by many to promote their education. We have 740 books, most of them on science. Though we have spent quite a bit of money to increase the efficiency of our library, there is still much room for improvement; for there is an ever greater demand for good instructive books. In the future we shall give this phase of our activity more attention.

    Our chorus is under the leadership of an able director and is making good progress. It has contributed much toward the success of our Sunday evening entertainments. However, it is desirable that more of our members participate 7in the activity of this branch of our organization--for their own benefit, and for the benefit of those who have not been endowed with "good" voices, but enjoy good vocal music.

    Concerning our school for instruction in English and free-hand drawing I wish to inform you that the society found it expedient to discontinue sessions during the summer; however this work will be resumed when cooler weather sets in, and will be under the supervision of an able instructor, thus affording every member an opportunity to acquire a knowledge of the English language--and every citizen of the United States should know English--and of the art of drawing. This latter branch was introduced for the benefit of those who desire to obtain technical knowledge. Unfortunately, past attendance was not very good. Let us take advantage of this facility, even though we may never expect to make regular use of what we learn about the art of technical drawing.

    8

    In my last report I recommended that the society erect a hall suitable for the purposes of the society, assuming that our fellow citizens will assist in this worthy enterprise. Our organization is growing rapidly because its activity has made it very popular, and that fact, too, should be considered when we face the problem of obtaining the money to pay for a building adequate to our needs. The Arbeiterverein is firmly convinced that the Germans of Chicago will not be found wanting in their contributions for this worthy cause, but will take great pride in assisting to erect a monument to German unity, industry, and charity.

    In conclusion, I wish to thank you for the confidence which you have shown during the past quarter, and for your generous and willing aid in the performance of my duties. Though it was impossible to please everybody, I assure you that it was my constant aim to promote the welfare of our society. I shall continue to keep this purpose in mind, and I hope that 9none of the members will be guided or controlled by petty jealousy or unjustified dissatisfaction, which might cause others to think ill of and belittle our organization.

    A. Braun, President.

    Chicago, May 27, 1863

    I take great pleasure in submitting my quarterly report; and I wish to congratulate the members upon the favorable standing of the society. Not only has the membership greatly increased ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 2 f, II B 1 a, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 26, 1866
    A Noble Offer

    H. F. Bonnet has promised to give an entertainment for the benefit of Bernhard Wiedinger's School, which is located on the North Side (La Salle Street near Chicago Avenue). Although the expenses will amount to at least $200, Mr. Bonnet said he would charge only $100, which would take care of the most necessary items. This figure could be greatly reduced if the charges for rent, advertising, and music could be eliminated. Mr. Bonnet, whose entire company will donate its services, will do the managing and will make all the necessary arrangements, so that the school committee will merely have to sell the tickets.

    The directors of the school association have tried to avoid soliciting help from Americans. They are proud because only Germans have purchased bonds, and they have the satisfaction of knowing that the school building has been erected through none but German donations. Their motto is: "Education through the school and education through the stage!" [Translator's 2note: the school referred to in this article was established by local Americans of German descent for the purpose of "perpetuating a knowledge of the German language among their children and children's children".]

    H. F. Bonnet has promised to give an entertainment for the benefit of Bernhard Wiedinger's School, which is located on the North Side (La Salle Street near Chicago Avenue). Although ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1867
    A.Sink's Academic Institute

    "I take great pleasure in publicly thanking the parents and students of the evening classes for their oral and written expressions of appreciation of the excellency of my school.

    "At the same time I wish to state that in an effort to render myself worthy of your esteem I shall continue to apply all diligence and faithfulness to my duties as an educator.

    "Respectfully,

    "A. Sink."

    We believe that we would be doing an able and conscientious, but very modest educator a grave injustice, if we published the above announcement without adding some remarks of our own, especially if we neglected to state that Mr. Sink is a well qualified and successful teacher, and that he has at heart the 2welfare of the children entrusted to his care. We are not recommending him blindly, for our testimony is based upon long observation and experience. We have attended the examinations of his classes and were astonished at the results. In his special classes, penmanship and mathematics, his children have made rapid strides, and we unhesitatingly advise all persons seeking an advanced course in commercial subjects to enroll in his school.

    "I take great pleasure in publicly thanking the parents and students of the evening classes for their oral and written expressions of appreciation of the excellency of my school. "At ...

    German
    II B 2 f, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 12, 1867
    Dyhrenfurth's Institute (Editorial)

    We have repeatedly called the attention of our readers to the above excellent institution, which is probably unsurpassed by any of its kind in the entire West, and of which Chicago can justly be proud.

    A new course will begin after Easter, and we cannot forego the opportunity to recommend this widely known and highly praised school to all parents and guardians who wish to give their children a good practical education. Mr. Dyhrenfurth has set the rates for tuition exceptionally low. All the professors are recognized as able and thoroughly educated teachers, and the knowledge acquired by children who attend the Institute, and the positions which many of the graduates hold in the social and business world of our city are proof of the diligence with which the instructors apply themselves to their 2various tasks.

    The Institute consists of a classical department, a school for girls and a commercial college. There are five classes in the classical department. The three lower classes offer a preparatory course, and the two upper classes a high school course. The purpose of the preparatory course is to give the pupil a good practical education which will enable him to enter the commercial school. In the upper classes, a complete course is offered in classics and mathematics, in preparation for attendance at a university. In these classes, Greek, Latin, French, German, and English are taught; also geometry, zoology, geography, rhetoric, drawing, chemistry, mathematics, etc. Each subject is taught by a man who has specialized in that field.

    The new school for girls which Mr. Dyhrenfurth has established has received favorable recognition, and the number of pupils attending it has steadily increased. The purpose of this branch of the Institute is to give girls a 3truly "feminine" education in domestic arts and in the supervision of a household. This school fills a long-felt need and is ably presided over by Miss Lee.

    We need add nothing about the excellence of the commercial department, for it is well known among local businessmen and is recognized over the entire West. We know from experience that every businessman prefers graduates from Dyhrenfurth's Commercial Institute to all other applicants, and that the students of this school always obtain positions in the best firms.

    Recently, Mr. Dyhrenfurth established a monthly magazine under the name The College Monthly. The motto of the publication is "scientia potestas". The first issue has just reached us. It contains several very excellent and instructive articles, some of them written by teachers or professors, and others by pupils of the upper grades. They are abundant proof of the ability of both teachers and students. Thus the Institute continues to progress in 4every respect, and Mr. Dyhrenfurt is leaving nothing undone to promote the general thorough training of those who attend his school.

    We have repeatedly called the attention of our readers to the above excellent institution, which is probably unsurpassed by any of its kind in the entire West, and of which ...

    German
    II B 2 f, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1871
    [The Turners Establish a School]

    The Chicago Turn-Gemeinde announces the opening of a Sunday School of 2 semesters beginning January 1st, and July 1st. Children to pay $2.00, adults $4.00 per semester. For members of the Turn-gemeinde free of charge. Instruction is in German, every Sunday morning, in the Turn-Halle(Gymnasium) on the Northside.

    Subjects to be taught: 1 Drawing, 2 Kalegraphy, 3 Arithmetic, 4 Geometry, 5 Rethoric and stylistic, 6 fundaments of music.

    The Chicago Turn-Gemeinde announces the opening of a Sunday School of 2 semesters beginning January 1st, and July 1st. Children to pay $2.00, adults $4.00 per semester. For members of ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1871
    [The Turner Community Sunday School]

    Report of the actual opening of the Sunday School of the Turngemeinde. The first speaker of the Turngemeinde, Carl Lotz, addressed almost a hundred prospective students and 40 representatives of all the Turnvereine of Illinois.

    Report of the actual opening of the Sunday School of the Turngemeinde. The first speaker of the Turngemeinde, Carl Lotz, addressed almost a hundred prospective students and 40 representatives of ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 21, 1871
    [The West Side German High School]

    The German High School on the west side has begun to offer to its boys and girls (separately, of course) athletic instruction. It is given by Turnlehrer Mr. Gloy in the Turnhalle Vorwarts in the presence of a teacher of the high school. On the Northside as is well known, the Turnverein has recently taken in hand the cause of girls' Turnen.

    The German High School on the west side has begun to offer to its boys and girls (separately, of course) athletic instruction. It is given by Turnlehrer Mr. Gloy in ...

    German
    II B 3, III A, II B 2 f
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 12, 1871
    [Turners Establish a School]

    The regular instruction in drawing in the school of the Chicago Turn Community (257 - 259 N. Clark Street) begins next Saturday at 2 P.M.; as for the other elementary subjects, such as German penmanship, German language, singing, natural science, geography, history and geometry next Sunday at 9 A:M. The teachers are Professor Schott, Dr. A. C. Lebell, H. von Langen and B. Ziehn.

    The monthly fee which is to be paid in advance amounts to fifty cents for each child. However, the third child of any family, two of whose children already attend the school, is admitted free.

    The regular instruction in drawing in the school of the Chicago Turn Community (257 - 259 N. Clark Street) begins next Saturday at 2 P.M.; as for the other elementary ...

    German
    II B 2 f, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 27, 1871
    [A New Teacher for the Ziegfeld Conservatory]

    Mr. Florenz Ziegfield has partly attained the aim of his journey to Germany by hiring a singing teacher for his conservatory.

    We read in the Leipziger Tageblatt of June 4:- "Just as England has found through the Leipzig Conservatory a great number of able performers and teachers, so the fame of the School is also more and more penetrating America... At the newly opened, grandstyle Conservatory in Chicago the singer recently graduated from Leipzig. Mr. James Gill, from Paisley near Glasgow, Scotland, has been engaged to teach singing. This talented and well-trained artist should all the better be able to collaborate fruitfully with Mr. Ziegfield, as Mr. Ziegfield, too, is a former student of the Leipzig Music Academy.

    Mr. Florenz Ziegfield has partly attained the aim of his journey to Germany by hiring a singing teacher for his conservatory. We read in the Leipziger Tageblatt of June 4:- ...

    German
    II A 3 b, III H, II B 2 f, IV