The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 10, 1861
    A Weighty Voice for the Suppression of Slavery America's Most Prominent Catholic Writer Advocates the Abolition of Slavery (Editorial)

    Who among our people has not heard of Orestes Brownson, the genial editor of "Quarterly Review," the most important organ of the Catholic Church in America? Until a short time ago Mr. Brownson was averse to abolition. However, several months ago, he declared himself in favor of the principle of restricting slavery, and in the latest issue of his journal he advocates the outright abolition of slavery.

    He advances the following reasons for his new stand on the issue:

    "Hitherto I have opposed abolition because of my love for the Constitution; for I believe that more stress should be placed on the preservation of 2peace in America and the whole world, and on the safety of the Union with its Constitution, than on the abolition of slavery in the Southern States. But now I am convinced that slavery must be abolished in order to suppress the rebellion; indeed, we must abolish slavery to defend the Union, our liberty, and our form of government!

    "We have but one alternative," declares Mr. Brownson, "and this is especially true of our laboring class: either we must subdue the rebels, or the rebels will subdue free laborers. Either we must annihilate the Southern Confederacy, or it will force its rule upon the free states and reduce their laborers to serfdom. In that case freedom in non-slave states would be restricted to a privileged class, but our working classes would be deprived of their liberty and would be placed on the same level with the plantation slaves of the South. Then, instead of a Christian Republic founded on human rights as our fathers intended, we would have a heathen government founded on slavery, which is directly opposed to Christianity."

    3

    Mr. Brownson warns against taking this War too lightly. "Who is not for us in this crisis is against us," he says, "and must be treated as an enemy. The very existence of the nation is at stake. Since no means are being spared to destroy it, in accordance with the law of self-preservation we have the right to use any means necessary to preserve it. This War cannot be carried on successfully as long as we treat the Southern Rebels as friends and allow them all advantages, instead of harming them as much as possible. The Rebels are using all their power to subject us; therefore we must employ all our strength and resources to subdue them.

    "The slave population of the South is a natural means of overthrowing the South. The three million slaves of the South are a component part of the people of the United States; they owe our Government loyalty, but they are also entitled to the protection of the Federal Government.

    "The Government of the United States has the right not only to arm the whites in west Virginia and East Tennessee, but also to make friends and allies of 4the slaves, to equip them with guns and swords, and to put them in the armed forces of the country. It is of no consequence that these people have heretofore been slaves in the respective states according to law and custom; for the laws and customs of these states have been invalidated through the act of rebellion. All laws for the defense of the life and property of the Rebels have been repealed by the rebellion; the rebellion has deprived the Rebels of the right to live and to possess property. If that were not a fact, the Government of the United States would have no right to suppress the rebellion by force of arms, or to confiscate the property of the Rebels.

    "If the slaves are not considered as property, they are citizens of the United States, they owe the Federal Government loyalty, they are duty-bound to serve the Government, and, like all other loyal citizens, they are entitled to the protection of the United States.

    "If the United States was ever constrained to regard the Negroes of the 5South as slaves, that obligation was terminated by the rebellion and the Government must now accord the Negroes the rights and consideration due all free men, thereby removing the cause for the rebellion, slavery.

    "And if the slaves of the Rebel states are to be looked upon as chattel, the Government has the right to confiscate them just as it may confiscate the rice, cotton, or other property of the Rebels. This right is based on the Confiscation Act which was adopted by Congress August 4.

    "The argument that the suppression of slavery would estrange West Virginia And East Tennessee from the Union, and make enemies of Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri is anything but tenable; for it was just this eternal consideration for the South that misled the Government into following the detrimental policy of taking half measures. Fear is the most ignorant counselor, and a government which is reluctant to follow the best policy, fearing that friends who object to the procedure might be estranged, is lost. The boundary between friend and enemy must be well defined. In a crisis 6like the present one, lukewarm friends and they who are our friends only when we make concessions in behalf of their interests or give way to their prejudices, are worse than open enemies. Shall the Northern States sacrifice their lives and property merely to satisfy the pretensions of the slaveholders in Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri? That would be unjust and unreasonable. The slaveholders of Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri are as deeply obligated to sacrifice their slave property for the welfare of the Union as the Northern States are to sacrifice themselves and their possessions to quell the Rebels. Besides, loyal slaveholders could be reimbursed for any losses which they might suffer through granting their slaves freedom."

    As we note from Tuesday's issue of the New York Herald, which was delivered to us last evening, Archbishop Hughes felt duty-bound to offer a strong protest against this masterful article of Mr. Brownson. We shall comment on this protest tomorrow.

    Who among our people has not heard of Orestes Brownson, the genial editor of "Quarterly Review," the most important organ of the Catholic Church in America? Until a short time ...

    German
    I J, I G, III C, II B 2 d 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 30, 1867
    For Tradesmen, Mechanics, and Artists "The Patent Law of the United States," and the "Scientific Americans" are two of the best illustrated periodicals for mechanics.

    Eduard Buehler,

    Book Store and Rental Library,

    lll Monroe Street.

    [Translator's note: This advertisement was translated because of the reference to a rental library. From all appearances this was one of the first rental libraries in the city of Chicago, if not the first. After having exhausted all sources of research available at Newberry Library, I find no information that a rental library existed here prior to the year 1867. Probably Mr. Buehler had books on mechanics which were not to be had on the local market, but which were in great demand at the time, and found it more profitable to rent them for a consideration than to sell them.]

    Eduard Buehler, Book Store and Rental Library, lll Monroe Street. [Translator's note: This advertisement was translated because of the reference to a rental library. From all appearances this was one ...

    German
    II A 2, II B 2 a, II B 2 d 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 13, 1873
    [A New Comic Periodical]

    The Eulenspiegel, a comic paper published by Moritz Langeloth, will appear next Saturday for the first time. We quote from the editorial:

    "Let it be said, once for all, that the character of private people will not be spoken of in the Eulenspiegel. As gladly as we accept for our paper communications which deal with matters of general interest, we shall assign communications of any other type to the waste basket."

    Only when guided by such principles will a comic paper be able to be successful.

    The Eulenspiegel, a comic paper published by Moritz Langeloth, will appear next Saturday for the first time. We quote from the editorial: "Let it be said, once for all, that ...

    German
    II B 2 d 2
  • Chicago Times -- October 03, 1873
    A German Weekly.

    Trump is the title of a German illustrated weekly paper, semi-comic in its nature that made its appearance in this city yesterday. It is published by Hon Edward Runnel, Esq. Allowing for the usual drawbacks incident to an initial publication Trump makes its appearance in a taking shape and in receiving many ecomiums.

    The title page illustrates the title. About a table are seated a monarch, a priest, and a bondholder. The former plays a card with a crown and scepter, the priest plays are marked with a cross, the bondholder presents are marked "bonds" Liberty, standing erect, plays the ace of spades represented by the national shield, labelled "Liberty" That is trumpo. A happy illustration is one entitled" The farmers' war; The Grangers Crossing the track of Monopoly."

    The literary features are poems by Mr. Binder and Emil Dietzsch.

    Trump is the title of a German illustrated weekly paper, semi-comic in its nature that made its appearance in this city yesterday. It is published by Hon Edward Runnel, Esq. ...

    German
    II B 2 d 2
  • Hejmdal -- January 01, 1876
    [Concerning the Theatre]

    On behalf of the Scandinavian people, I beg to inform you, that the editor of Scandinaven or its aesthetic theatre and literary importer, make fools of the public, the actors, and the playrights. A short time ago there was an announcement regarding A.B.C. Scandinaven made it a farce by saying how deep and clever the author of the A.B.C. was to write such a wonderful book. But before Christmas a stage show was played. It's name was Newlywed, by "Bjornson"; Scandinavian critics stated that he saw the same show at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, but that there was no comparison; the Chicago amateurs were far above the Royal theatre. Chicago actors played in a much more refined and delicate style, etc. That is the kind of criticism Scandinaven dares print when it is well-known, too, that the Chicago actors are only amateurs, trying to bring a little joy to their countrymen in Chicago, That is the thanks Scandinaven is giving them, comparing them with star professional actors.

    On behalf of the Scandinavian people, I beg to inform you, that the editor of Scandinaven or its aesthetic theatre and literary importer, make fools of the public, the actors, ...

    Danish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 2 d 2, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 c 1
  • Hejmdal -- January 01, 1876
    [Concerning the Theatre]

    On behalf of the Scandinavian people, I beg to inform you, that the editor of Scandinaven or its aesthetic theatre and literary importer, make fools of the public, the actors, and the playrights. A short time ago there was an announcement regarding A.B.C. Scandinaven made it a farce by saying how deep and clever the author of the A.B.C. was to write such a wonderful book. But before Christmas a stage show was played. It's name was Newlywed, by "Bjornson"; Scandinavian critics stated that he saw the same show at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, but that there was no comparison; the Chicago amateurs were far above the Royal theatre. Chicago actors played in a much more refined and delicate style, etc. That is the kind of criticism Scandinaven dares print when it is well-known, too, that the Chicago actors are only amateurs, trying to bring a little joy to their countrymen in Chicago, That is the thanks Scandinaven is giving them, comparing them with star professional actors.

    On behalf of the Scandinavian people, I beg to inform you, that the editor of Scandinaven or its aesthetic theatre and literary importer, make fools of the public, the actors, ...

    Danish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 2 d 2, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 c 1
  • Jewish Advance -- June 14, 1878
    Circular

    A chaste and comprehensive Jewish journal seems to be a necessity in this city. We have undertaken the task of publishing such a paper, and hope to meet with the encouragement of all classes of citizens. We have engaged in the editiorial management the best talent suited for the purpose. The following are the rules which are laid down for the conduct of The Jewish Advance:

    1. The news of the day, pertaining to social interest in general and to Jewish society in particular, shall be condensed in columns of The Jewish Advance in brief and comprehensive paragraphs. For this purpose we have ordered exchanges from Germany, France, England, Russia, and so forth, and we have opened a correspondence with many personal friends, both here and in Europe. We will thus be able to give our readers items of interest from the first sources, and earlier than any other journal of the kind.

    2. Domestic and local news we will also gather at the first source. No 2correspondence will be accepted unless we shall know the writer to be a responsible and fair-minded person. In religious and social matters, we will allow fair play to the opinions of our contributors; but we will reserve the privilege to reject or correct all such contributions, which might be displeasing to good taste.

    3. We shall endeavor to promote every good measure, which will be advanced either by our venerable contemporaries, or by any of our representative men for the welfare and elevation of our race.

    4. Our belletristic part will consist of original stories, sketches, essays, and so forth, either from our own pen or from that of our contributors. We will give all encouragement to domestic talent.

    5. In our editorial articles, the questions of the day will be treated; in "The Pulpit" department we will bring synopsis of sermons and lectures by our representative pulpit orators; in the "Students' Column" chips of learning 3and wisdom will be brought; and the German department, (embracing the 6th and 7th pages,) will also be varied with matters of good taste and useful information.

    6. The Jewish Advance will have a Calendar of Lodges, Congregations and important social meetings of the week, in which every movement of general interest will be noted down. We shall be thankful to lecturers, ministers and presidents of social organizations, if they will send us subjects of lectures or important debates to be announced beforehand.

    Besides these regulations we shall endeavor to introduce as many useful and agreeable features in The Jewish Advance, as time and experience may suggest. We shall strive to be pleasing and useful, and hope that the confidence and support of all fair-minded people will assist us to a successful career, which may be an honor to the Israelites of our city and a benefit to many......

    Henry Gersoni, editor.

    Max Stern, publisher.

    A chaste and comprehensive Jewish journal seems to be a necessity in this city. We have undertaken the task of publishing such a paper, and hope to meet with the ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 d 2
  • Skandinaven -- July 27, 1880
    A New Scandinavian Monthly

    The Viking seems to be a paper with a future. It has already found a great number of readers. It is published at 269 Milwaukee Avenue. The Viking is filled with humor and satire. We feel that it will be welcomed by Scandinavian readers.

    The Viking seems to be a paper with a future. It has already found a great number of readers. It is published at 269 Milwaukee Avenue. The Viking is filled ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 2
  • The Occident -- February 04, 1881
    The Chicagoer Israelit

    This Hebrew publication has just been issued and presents a handsome typographical appearance. For the present the same comes as a monthly. It is hoped that the indefatigable publisher, Mr. Ettelsohn, may soon receive sufficient encouragement to allow the Israelit to appear weekly.

    This Hebrew publication has just been issued and presents a handsome typographical appearance. For the present the same comes as a monthly. It is hoped that the indefatigable publisher, Mr. ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 d 2
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 30, 1883
    The Central Committee's Session.

    The Central Committee's Session at which comrade Bluhm presided was held last night. Representatives of different clubs gave their reports. Comrade Schwab called to attention the proposed selling of pamphlets and Comrade Spies asked for a loan of $20.00 for the purchase of literature in question. Mr. Schwab was entrusted with the management of this. The centralization for the sale of such was recommended. The South side club asked the management of the Socialist Publishing Society, to employ as newsboys only those who are members of one of the clubs.

    The newly established Bohemian Club sent two representatives, to ask the Central Committee to send a delegation to view their new club.

    A committee of Messrs. Spies, Livoni and Schwab was appointed to visit and report on the new club. Comrade Winnen proposed to abolish the paying of taxes by clubs separately. This will be discussed at the next meeting. Concerning the question of agitation literature several proposals were made and accepted. It was decided, to have the Communist manifesto and LaSalle's "Right and Power" and "About the Constitution" appear in English. The question what the connection of the "Lehr and Wehr Verein" to the Socialist party is, shall be discussed by each club.

    The Central Committee's Session at which comrade Bluhm presided was held last night. Representatives of different clubs gave their reports. Comrade Schwab called to attention the proposed selling of pamphlets ...

    German
    I E, IV, I C, II B 2 g, II B 2 d 2