The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 28, 1891
    Scandinavian Civil Engineers Organize

    The Scandinavian Engineering Society of Chicago was organized last Thursday, the 21, at a meeting held in the Sherman House. The following officers were elected: Allan Strale, president; L. Holmboe, first vice-president; E.T. Sederholm, second vice-president; Thomas G. Pihlfedit, secretary; and Chr. Holth, treasurer. By-laws were drafted and adopted.

    The Scandinavian Engineering Society of Chicago was organized last Thursday, the 21, at a meeting held in the Sherman House. The following officers were elected: Allan Strale, president; L. Holmboe, ...

    Swedish
    II A 1, II B 2 c
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 18, 1891
    A Chronicle of Poles in America A Memorial Book of 1891 One Hundred Years after the Proclamation of the Constitution of the Third of May 1871

    I am going to publish a Polish memorial book entitled "A Chronicle of Poles in America," (Kronika Polska w Ameryce) in honor of the memorable anniversary of the Constitution of May 3, 1871, and as a proof of our existence here in exile.

    This book will give an account of all Polish celebrations in America, a list of speeches and speakers, also a detailed description of all Polish settlements in America, with a list containing the names of the inhabitants and the name and location of the sections from which they come.

    Furthermore, this book will also show how many members there are in each family. In other words, it will give correct information of the number of 2Poles living in America at present.

    Each settlement will be mentioned separately, and a brief record of it will be shown. It will tell when and by whom the settlement was founded. It will also reveal the first Polish settlers who built the first church and school. It will give the name of the first pastor and his successors.

    I already have the most important material, and desire to have all available information as soon as possible.

    Every true and well-thinking Pole will admit that this book will be a permanent record of Polish activities,of the spiritual and material progress of the Poles on American soil, and at the same time, it is a public protest against the slanders of our enemies who deny our good qualities and our right to make a livelihood.

    It will be a permanent record, I repeat, for the voice of the newspapers 3will soon die out and be forgotten, but such a book will be handed down as an inheritance from parents to children, from generation to generation for many years, and will be sent to the libraries in Washington where it will last for centuries. Besides, this book will be a beginning and a foundation of the Polish history of Poles in exile after the partition of Poland.

    Finally, this book being of a larger size than a regular photographic album, printed on good paper, beautifully illustrated, and in durable binding, will be an ornament in your home.

    The clergy, editors of newspapers, presidents and secretaries of organizations, and all societies are asked to give their kind co-operation and support to this publication in their vicinities. They are asked to send in data of their neighborhood, or to recommend a worthy citizen, a good writer, who would undertake this work. Kindly have him communicate with 4me, and I will be glad to give further instructions.

    The sooner I receive the particulars, the quicker the work will be finished.

    In conclusion, I wish to inform the public that in order to prevent any one from reprinting the book, or a possible competition, I have registered it in the proper office of the United States, a country so favorable toward the Poles. I also wish to announce that the book will be published by subscriptions, either cash or in four convenient payments, for which special canvassers will be engaged.

    Further details will be announced later. At present, I am waiting for the result of my appeal.

    Respectfully yours,

    I. Wendzinski

    488 Mitchell Street,

    Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    Aug. 1, 1891.

    I am going to publish a Polish memorial book entitled "A Chronicle of Poles in America," (Kronika Polska w Ameryce) in honor of the memorable anniversary of the Constitution of ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 3, I C, II C, II B 2 c
  • Abendpost -- October 05, 1891
    "German" Day

    It can no longer be claimed, that in a large city like Chicago a getting together of all"Germans" for the celebration of the "German" Day is impossible since such a celebration has taken place recently even in New York. "Germanism" is far more influential in Chicago than New York, However, the "Germans" in Chicago have not been sufficiently aroused to be fully aware of their own importance. They seem to have no desire for politics and even along other lines they do not play the role in public life which they should due to their numerical strength and intellectual culture. They do not assert themselves and hence they are overlooked. Perhaps it is rather a lack of knowledge, that the "German-Americans" fail to understand the importance of "Germanism" in the development of this country. This can only be remedied, if the "Germans" themselves show up these facts in their real significance. A demonstration showing the arrival of "German" pilgrims 200 years ago, will accomplish much. It will remind the Americans that the "Germans" have their pioneers in this country as well as the "Anglo-Saxons." Other ways and means must be used besides this demonstration. The proposition to organize a club for historical research of "Germanism" in the United States, is worthy of 2serious condideration. This research Society should then find entrance into the new Chicago University. Another suggestion that should not be ignored is the erection of monuments for real outstanding great "German-Americans."

    It can no longer be claimed, that in a large city like Chicago a getting together of all"Germans" for the celebration of the "German" Day is impossible since such a ...

    German
    III B 2, I C, I J, III H, III F, III A, II B 2 c, II B 1 c 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 29, 1892
    The Monument Project (Editorial)

    The project undertaken by Chicago Poles to raise funds to erect a statue of Kosciuszko in one of the city parks deserves praise and support.

    In this materialistic world of ours, where beautiful ideals are short lived, where our brilliant past is getting obliterated from our minds, where there is a continual severance from our forefathers' principles and spirit of endurance, this patriotic attempt merits applause. The spirit of our youth, especially of our immigrant parents, has cooled considerably in the appreciation of the endeavors, struggles, sacrifices, and heroisms of our forefathers. Today, as the current of materialism is enveloping the world, our youth is snatched by its undercurrent, and as it rises to think for itself, it finds only a smattering of Polish tradition. Yet, out of this materialistic chaos, a noble and praiseworthy project has been born.

    2

    We firmly and emphatically aver that the Pole of today still carries a warm feeling in his heart for patriotic ideals and remembers those who have, either by pen, word, might, or sacrifice, brought fame to their country and earned credit for their accomplishments.

    At present we are entering a period which marks the one hundredth year of our last day of freedom. The century mark is about to pass that marks the time when three greedy enemies tore asunder our country to perpetrate dastardly crimes at the expense of our forefathers. Our country was eradicated from the face of the map of free peoples. Our forebears were placed in a tomb. The once freedom-loving Poles were shorn of their privileges and placed in shackles of servitude. The flower of our people either perished on the field of battle for freedom or succumbed on the field of exile of the frozen Siberian steppes.

    3

    However, this one hundredth anniversary, although sad to the hearts of all Poles, has not passed without praise. Our heroes and martyrs who gave up their lives for a national cause are our pride and joy today, for they have shown to the world the kind of metal the Poles are made of, despite the loss of their country.

    At the head of these heroes we place our immortal leader, Thaddeus Kosciuszko. If we have fallen, we have fallen with honor and praise. "Tout est perdu, hor l'honneur." All is lost, but honor. We can rightfully use this French saying in our case.

    The praise and honor of salvation have been exemplified by our hero, Kosciuszko, who was the first to rally our provincial people under the banner of the white eagle; the first to strike at the enemy with scythes. By the might of the scythes, he captured the cannon of the archenemy and fought until the last drop of his blood gave out. He gave up because of 4the superior forces of the invaders, but he fell like a hero, fighting to the last minute, just as long as there shined a ray of hope.

    Thaddeus Kosciuszko fought not only for the freedom of his people but also for the freedom of our adopted country. The battlefields of two worlds saw his heroic prowess, and on American soil he won undying fame.

    Noble and true is the idea that the Poles in the United States want to pay tribute to this great man by erecting a bronze statue in his memory.

    Just as the proponents of this project, who have come to the front to defend the honor of our hero and country, we wholeheartedly pledge our support to make it possible for the day when all of us will commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of our struggle for freedom.

    5

    In connection with this noble cause, we have been entertaining an idea that we would like to express to our readers. We want to present this idea without any pretense at obstructing or condemning other plans. We would rather have the public take it as a frank, open statement submitted to their judgment.

    Our hero, Thaddeus Kosciuszko, above all, fought for the freedom of Poland, of whom he was a son. He also fought for the freedom of America, but as a friend and worshiper of those who love freedom.

    Our compatriots always remember the heroic deeds of this great patriot of freedom, and many statues in his honor have been erected throughout Poland. In the old palatial fortress of Wawel, many treasured relics of his are buried with the great men of Poland and many of his memorable letters and bulletins remain untouched in the archives. His tomb has been built with the aid of thousands of people, and it is for that reason that his name will live forever.

    6

    In this country, Thaddeus Kosciuszko did not battle for the freedom of Poland, but for the freedom of America. At that time, when Polish blood was protecting the soil of the United States, no one ever gave a thought to the idea that the Poles would some day seek the protection of this land. This thought did not even occur to Kosciuszko, for he refused the vast grants of land offered him by Washington for his military prowess.

    Therefore the people in America ought to build him a monument. If the United States is so liberal in building statues to war heroes whose deeds do not compare with Kosciuszko's while under the command of Washington, then it would be a noble gesture on its part to pay its respects to him for his services.

    The hospitality bestowed upon our hero was not because of his meritorious deeds, but because it was customary. Thousands of others were feted to a 7greater extent, and yet they did not pretend to equal the feats of Kosciuszko. America does not praise the immigrants for their sacrifices and journey. Not at all! It is done primarily for the best interest of America. The immigrants are a great source of wealth because they work hard. Where would America be today without them?

    We repeat that we are not opposed to honoring our hero, but we would like to alter the form of memorial, that is, to erect one of such a character as to prove beneficial to the Polish immigrants.

    A monument is merely bronze; its value is idealistic, gaining momentary prominence and then fading with the years. Although the sacrifices would be great, its advantage to the people would be small, let alone the hero, for whom it would gain very little respect among our materialistic generation.

    8

    But a monument erected in honor of our noble hero, with our money, for the purpose of helping our people, would be a greater and nobler memorial, one that would give assistance to the unfortunate immigrant Poles.

    During his life, Kosciuszko did not gather any laurels, passing them on to Napoleon, but his heart was always filled to the brim with Christian goodness and hospitality to all. His famous horse would stop, out of habit, before every beggar, for his master never avoided the poor.

    What pride and honor would a memorial institution bring to our hero and our people if it were to be erected on one of the better sites of Chicago with the inscription of "Kosciuszko's Polish Memorial Hospital!"

    9

    This kind of monument would combine both praise for our hero and compassion for our suffering people. It would forever evoke prayers of thanks for the soul of Kosciuszko. This, in reality, would be the best memorial, aere perennius, more lasting than bronze! In this memorial shelter, those getting relief from their pains would forevermore extol words of thanks to him.

    The project undertaken by Chicago Poles to raise funds to erect a statue of Kosciuszko in one of the city parks deserves praise and support. In this materialistic world of ...

    Polish
    II B 2 c, I J, I C, III G, III F, II D 3
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 22, 1892
    Among Our Engineers

    The Scandinavian Engineering Society of Chicago held its regular monthly meeting last Thursday, at the Sherman House, under the presidency of Allan Strale. A discussion on "The Relative Features of Rope and Belt Transmissions" was opened by the society's first vice president, E. T. Sederholm, who holds the position of chief engineer of the Fraser & Chalmer's Engine Works. A discussion of the same subject will be resumed at the society's next monthly meeting, at which time a written treatise on the subject, will be read by N. A. Christensen, who is a consulting engineer with the above mentioned firm. Non-members are invited to take part in these instructive discussions.

    The Scandinavian Engineering Society of Chicago held its regular monthly meeting last Thursday, at the Sherman House, under the presidency of Allan Strale. A discussion on "The Relative Features of ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, II A 1, II B 2 c
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 20, 1893
    Dr. F. H. Bernard Dies.

    The Germans of Chicago, especially the cultured and educated classes, suffered a severe loss through the death of Dr. F. H. Bernard, yesterday at 5 o'clock.

    Although Dr. Bernard had not lived in Chicago very long, he, nevertheless, had gained a splendid reputation as a man of great knowledge. He was famous as a writer and as a brilliant speaker on natural sciences. He likewise won a large number of friends through his sincere, kindly, and noble character.

    Dr. Bernard was born on May 20, 1833, near Treptow, Germany. After he had received a thorough college education, he went to Berlin, where he studied at the university. His special subjects were mathematics and natural sciences. After finishing his studies he received a position at the Berlin observatory. He made a special study of spectroscopy and was considered an authority in this field.

    Dr. Bernard came to America in 1882. For some time he was employed as a chemist by the Pennsylvania Salt Works at Natrona, Pa. Having been meat 2inspector in Berlin and having gained a reputation as such, the Federal Government appointed him as one of the supervisors at the Government meat inspecting bureau of the stockyards in Chicago. This position he maintained until his death. A stomach disease caused his death.

    Dr. Bernard was very socially minded. He joined preferably those clubs which also cultivated sciences and literature. He was a very highly esteemed member of the German Press Club, and the Club of Technicians, where he lectured repeatedly on natural sciences. A series of public lectures on similar subjects in Brand's Hall is undoubtedly well remembered by those who attended.

    His widow and a married son survive him.

    The Germans of Chicago, especially the cultured and educated classes, suffered a severe loss through the death of Dr. F. H. Bernard, yesterday at 5 o'clock. Although Dr. Bernard had ...

    German
    IV, III H, II A 1, III D, II B 1 d, II B 2 c, II B 2 d 1
  • Lietuva -- July 08, 1893
    Appeal to the Lithuanians of Chicago

    There was an article in number 23 of Lietuva about the Lithuanian Alliance of America. Such an alliance among the Lithuanians is very essential. A few years ago there was organized a Lithuanian science society. This society failed because it criticized the Catholic religion, priests, etc. The leaders of this organization did not care about the church, faith and the benefits of the Catholic religion.

    We must organize all Lithuanian societies in Chicago to join the Lithuanian Catholic Alliance of America.

    This Lithuanian Catholic Alliance of America has already published a history of Lithuania written by Simonis Daukantas. This book will be given free to all members of the Lithuanian alliance.

    It is the time for our Lithuanians in Chicago to join this organization, we will do good not only for ourselves but to the Catholic faith and to our mother Lithuania.

    Mikolinis

    There was an article in number 23 of Lietuva about the Lithuanian Alliance of America. Such an alliance among the Lithuanians is very essential. A few years ago there was ...

    Lithuanian
    III B 2, III C, II B 2 c
  • Reform Advocate -- December 02, 1893
    (No headline)

    The Jewish Culture Association of Chicago is the name of a new organization for the purpose of promoting a better knowledge of Jewish history and literature. The Association meets every Monday evening at the B'nai Abraham Temple.

    The Jewish Culture Association of Chicago is the name of a new organization for the purpose of promoting a better knowledge of Jewish history and literature. The Association meets every ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 c
  • Lietuva -- January 06, 1894
    (No headline)

    Citizen Mikolainis made a motion to celebrate on the 4th day of March, as the day has historical value when the slavery serfdom was abolished in Lithuania. The motion was approved. It was also decided to get women speakers and young girls and boys to say declamations.

    The following representatives were at this meeting:

    K. Andruszis, president of St. Casimir Prince the Knight Society;

    S. Pacewiczia, president of The Province of God Society;

    A. Dzialtuwa, president of St. George Society;

    W.Wabalinskas, president of The Duke Gedeminas Society;

    Fr.Mikolainis, president of Simones Daukantas Society;

    A. Naweckas, president of St. John Society

    J.Szimkewiczia, president of The Lithuanian Political Club

    J. Kalesinskas, president of The Lithuanian Alliance Chapter.

    Citizen Mikolainis made a motion to celebrate on the 4th day of March, as the day has historical value when the slavery serfdom was abolished in Lithuania. The motion was ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 1 d, II B 2 d 3, II B 2 c, II B 1 e
  • Lietuva -- January 06, 1894
    Meeting of the Presidents of Chicago Lithuanian Societies

    December 31st, a meeting was held at Azeckas Hall, 3301 Auburn Ave. The chairman of this meeting was elected K.Andruszis, a president of the St. Casimir Society.

    The president of Simonas Daukantas society, F. Mikolainis, announced that the Rev. Zebrys is writing a Lithuanian Geography, so the Lithuanians of Chicago ought to write about themselves, to give a material for the Lithuanian Geography. This question was approved and Mr.J.Grinius was elected to write a geography of the Chicago Lithuanians.

    A question was brought up about the jubilee book on Simonas Daukantas to be published. The question was approved and it was decided that all Chicago Lithuanian societies must come with financial aid.

    About the opening of Lithuanian library it was decided that the library must be opened with a celebration, and that all Chicago Lithuanian societies must take part in this celebration.

    2

    Citizen Mikolainis made a motion to celebrate on the 4th day of March, as the day has historical value when the slavery serfdom was abolished in Lithuania. The motion was approved. It was also decided to get women speakers and young girls and boys to say declamations.

    The following representatives were at this meeting:

    K. Andruszis, president of St. Casimir Prince the Knight Society;

    S. Pacewiczia, president of The Province of God Society;

    A. Dzialtuwa, president of St. George Society;

    W.Wabalinskas, president of The Duke Gedeminas Society;

    Fr.Mikolainis, president of Simones Daukantas Society;

    A. Naweckas, president of St. John Society

    J.Szimkewiczia, president of The Lithuanian Political Club

    J. Kalesinskas, president of The Lithuanian Alliance Chapter.

    December 31st, a meeting was held at Azeckas Hall, 3301 Auburn Ave. The chairman of this meeting was elected K.Andruszis, a president of the St. Casimir Society. The president of ...

    Lithuanian
    III B 2, II B 2 d 3, II B 2 c, II B 1 e, II B 1 d