The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- July 22, 1882
    Music (Chicago's Opera-Society)

    A large number of music lovers gathered yesterday afternoon at, Weber's Saloon, to listen to Mr. Will Davis and Prof. Liesegang's proposals, in connection with the establishment of an amateur opera school for Chicago.

    A committee of the following persons has been appointed: Fred Root, W. H. Clark, H. F. Starbuck, Samuel Kayser, Joseph M. Goodwillie, John Mc Wade and Adolph Liesegang.

    This committee's duty consists of drafting a plan for statutes and instructions.

    A large number of music lovers gathered yesterday afternoon at, Weber's Saloon, to listen to Mr. Will Davis and Prof. Liesegang's proposals, in connection with the establishment of an amateur ...

    German
    II A 3 b, II B 1 a, II B 2 b
  • Abendpost -- July 27, 1892
    The German House.

    The German house of the World's Fair in Chicago as center and representative house of the German Empire, will be built on a location near the lake, and very close to the one of Great Britain. Its size is estimated at 32,000 square feet. The government's architect, Mr.Radke, has drawn the plans. Architect Fiedler Living in Chicago for some time, together with the German Consul Buentz are supervising the erection of the building. Adjoining the main building will be a chapel in the late Gothic style, where exhibits will be shown of Christian art. The main building will have all the offices and a hall for the meetings of the visiting Germans, also special exhibits of German art, industry and inventions may be shown. The building will be of wood, which has been cut in Germany and will be transported over here. Several firms have supplied cut wood free of charge. The decorations of the exhibition room will be done under the supervisions of architect Haffarker and architect Radke. The illustrated magazines will soon be in the position to publish the plans.

    The German house of the World's Fair in Chicago as center and representative house of the German Empire, will be built on a location near the lake, and very close ...

    German
    II B 2 b, II B 1 c 3
  • Zgoda -- October 19, 1892
    A Plea to the Poles in United States

    After completing its difficult tasks, the administration of Polish National Alliance informs us Poles residing in the United States, that the National Library and Museum shall be officially opened Saturday, Oct. 22, 1892 at 3 P.M., free to the public.

    The historical works, documents, and memoirs shall be found here, gift of honorable Dr. Kalussowki, who was the first one to lay the corner stone of this great institution known as the National Library and Museum.

    The one who knows and understands what a priceless store of knowledge the library and museum are for us, will be convinced that a national institution of this kind is necessary to us.

    The organ of P.N.A. wishes to inform everyone of this newly established institution. It is also asking everyone to patronize it, and by this act help the organization to go with its excellent work.

    After completing its difficult tasks, the administration of Polish National Alliance informs us Poles residing in the United States, that the National Library and Museum shall be officially opened Saturday, ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, III B 2, II B 2 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 24, 1892
    Polish National Alliance Opens Museum and Library

    The Polish National Alliance Library and Museum was officially opened to the public Saturday afternoon at three o'clock. The institution was made possible through the gifts of Dr. H. Kalussowski of Washington, D. C., which are to be under the guardianship of the Alliance.

    The ceremonies took place at the Central Committee's headquarters on Noble Street. Besides the directors of the Library, presidents of many societies belonging to the Polish National Alliance were in attendance. There were also several members of the Kosciuszko Guard from Milwaukee, including Captain E. Slupecki. This group came to Chicago as a part of the Wisconsin State Militia to take part in the Columbus Day parade. They voluntarily attended the dedication ceremonies Saturday. Many other guests were also present.

    The group from Milwaukee opened the dedication ceremonies with a military 2salute.

    Adalia Satalecki was the first speaker. He associated the opening of the Library with the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America by Columbus. The speaker also gave recognition to Dr. Kalussowski for his work, and mentioned the events leading to the opening of the institution. He concluded his speech by urging everyone to support this Library in the name of culture.

    The next speaker was the Secretary of the Polish National Alliance, A. Mallek, who read the speech of Dr. Kalussowski, the donor of the Library, and the proclamation of the establishment of the Library by the Central Committee. According to the statute the newly-opened institution is to be called "The Polish Library and Museum of Chicago, under the guardianship of the Polish National Alliance." Its official staff will be composed of nine directors, two of whom will be Dr. Kalussowski and his 3son, and the remaining seven of whom will be elected; the latter are to hold office for one year. The present directors are S. Kociemski, Dr. Casimir Midowicz, Max Drzemala, A. Blaszyczynski and Mr. J. Pulkowski. The directors choose officers from their own group.

    Later, during the dedication activities, the installation of Mr. Kociemski as president of the Library and guardian of its laws and documents took place.

    A. Koinski, secretary of the Library, then took the speaker's stand. He brought out the importance of culture for our national cause and urged everyone to benefit from the literary treasures of the newly-opened library.

    A letter from Dr. Kalussowski of Washington was read to the assembly; it thanked the directors for their work.

    4

    Dr. Midowicz thanked the visitors from Milwaukee for attending this affair....He averred that the library is the hearth from which radiate the rays of culture and education.....He urged everyone to work for this culture--and predicted the resurrection of Poland through the medium of work and culture!....

    The next speaker was Constantine Mallek of Wisconsin, secretary of Skarbo Naro Dowego (Polish National Fund). Using the Fund as an example, Mr. Mallek pointed out how quickly the drive was amassing money from small contributions. He earnestly pressed everyone to further the development of the new Library through continual and painstaking work.

    Mr. F. Gryglaszewski, present Censor of the Polish National Alliance, was present. He suggested that a register be kept of all persons visiting the Library. Captain Slupecki spoke in the name of his group.

    After the dedication ceremonies everyone visited the collections in the 5Museum and Library.

    The Polish National Alliance Library and Museum was officially opened to the public Saturday afternoon at three o'clock. The institution was made possible through the gifts of Dr. H. Kalussowski ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, IV, III H, III D, III B 2, II B 2 b, III B 3 a
  • Zgoda -- November 30, 1892
    The Polish Library and National Museum

    It is with great pleasure that we wish to announce the fact that the donations to the Polish National Museum and Library have not ceased pouring in.

    Some organizations are donationg various kinds of books, others many important tokens or priceless works of art. We name a few, such as Mr. Czaplinski, who donated Webster's Dictionary, in English; Mr. Stanislaus Walewski, who gave seven volumes of Tarlo; Mr. Wendycz gave Licht und Schattenbilder Des New York Lebens, by James McCabe; the Kosciuszko Organization offered the complete works of J. I. Kraszewski, consisting of sixty-one books; and Mr. S. Nicki gave a piece of metal from the original coffin in which Adam Mickiewicz the greatest Polish poet, was buried.

    For these gifts we thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

    A. Koinski

    Secretary.

    It is with great pleasure that we wish to announce the fact that the donations to the Polish National Museum and Library have not ceased pouring in. Some organizations are ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 b
  • Lietuva -- December 16, 1893
    The Purpose of Simonas Daukantas Society

    December 10, a meeting was held by the society of Simonas Daukantas, the constitution was adopted, and after many discussions the meeting decided upon the following principles:

    1. To spread education among Lithuanians, to teach the Lithuanian language, to propagate Lithuanian literature.

    2. To establish a library, to keep all kinds of Lithuanian books and newspapers, and also books in other languages.

    3. The society will celebrate all national holidays, and will present theatrical plays.

    4. The society will take part in spiritual and material activities.

    2

    5. The society will take part in American and European politics.

    6. The society will collect relics for the Lithuanian Museum.

    7. The society will help those Lithuanians who are seeking higher education.

    8. The society will join the Lithuanian Catholic Alliance of America, and will never participate in any action against the Catholic religion. (Trans. note: - The society still exists, now as a liberal society, and does not participate in nor supports any religious activities.)

    3

    Any Lithuanian of good morals and manners, and who is over sixteen years of age, can join this society.

    All money from dues and donations will be used for the library of Lithuanian literature. The initiation fee is fifty cents. Monthly dues are fifteen cents.

    Any member of this society may be fined or expelled from the society for any bad manners or bad activities.

    Sick members must be visited by society members, and given spiritual and material aid.

    At every meeting of this society scientific questions must be brought for discussion and for proper explanation.

    4

    J. Kolesinskis gave one book, History of the Church; the Lithuanian Catholic Alliance of America gave one book, History of Europe, and another, The Manners of Ancient Lithuanians, of Samogitians and Mountaineers.

    Also Mr. M. Nomeskis, who has a large book store in Tilzen Ost, Germany, donated sixteen copies of various books.

    December 10, a meeting was held by the society of Simonas Daukantas, the constitution was adopted, and after many discussions the meeting decided upon the following principles: 1. To spread ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 1 d, II B 2 g, III B 2, II B 2 a, II B 2 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 27, 1895
    To the Poles of America Relative to the Building of the Kosciusko Monument

    (The following announcement was received by Dziennik Chicagoski for publication.)

    Chicago, February 26, 1895.

    A few years ago a large number of people got together and proposed the building of a monument in one of our parks in Chicago to our immortal hero of two continents, Thaddeus Kosciusko. This movement received great impetus from the Polish people from the beginning, but the enthusiasm dwindled. Sporadic attempts at reviving this spirit failed. With each attempt the contributions became smaller.

    Our committee has finally established itself on a lasting and firm foundation, for it has already collected a substantial sum of money. And, what is more important, measures have been taken so that this fund will not be endangered, 2and sooner or later the aims of the committee will be realized. Our committee, with serious concern, has made an investigation of the Polish press, which has not been very favorable toward us. All of its allegations have been taken under consideration and dealt with objectively. No personal feeling has entered into their treatment, for they are regarded with the utmost respect and not with condemnation, since they express a cross section of Polish national feeling.

    I wish to acknowledge the fact that in reality our committee had been asleep for a certain time, as the press charges, but the causes which brought this about will probably justify the lethargy which may have been mistaken for negligence in other directions. For although the past two years of depression brought hardships to all throughout America, and brought unemployment to a large number of the Polish people, the Poles were able to muster enough strength to rally their spirit toward the making of sacrifices. Reference is being made to the contributions for Polish Day at the World's Columbian Exposition, the Polish Hospital, the many parish fairs, and the Lwow Fair. All this was no easy task amid constant unemployment, but the Polish people 3quietly donated pennies and dollars for the various worthy endeavors. This committee, realizing the tremendous pressure the Poles were undergoing, decided to abandon temporarily its drive for funds for the Kosciusko monument until a more favorable time.

    A statement showing the amount of money received is regularly published in the organ of the Polish National Alliance, Zgoda, Gazeta Katolicka (Catholic Gazette) and Dziennik Chicagoski. All the contributions accounted for in this respect are deposited in the bank of P. O. Stensland, a reputable individual, who has been endorsed by many of our leading citizens. Mr. Stensland has insured the safety of the funds. He has been purposely chosen treasurer, although he is of another nationality. This eliminates any excuses harbored by our enemies, especially a few of the Polish papers that have opposed this drive, and any unfavorable insinuations about the way the committee handles the contributions.

    Almost a thousand dollars (2250 gulden) has been paid out of the funds for the Kosciusko Monument Contest. The three models that received awards may 4be seen at our Polish Museum, 574 Noble Street, Chicago, Illinois. Mention also must be made of the five thousand dollars that has been loaned to Holy Trinity Parish at five per cent for one year. This money was loaned to the parish because of its sincere efforts to foster Polish culture through the building of a new Polish school. When a critical moment arose that threatened the completion of the school building, the committee decided to loan the money.

    Whatever has been done has been done openly. All of our actions have been turned over to the Polish press for criticism, and efforts have been made to remedy any objections that have been honestly and sincerely criticized. At no time were there any derogatory remarks made about the suggested changes.

    The Kosciusko Monument Fund Committee, which has opened the drive by substantial contributions from its directors, has been performing all its duties gratis, and it is determined to finish the work it has started with the support of the Polish public.

    5

    At the present time it is impossible to start work on the monument because there are not sufficient funds. We have learned from past experience that once something is started with inadequate sums of money it always brings untold troubles and problems. As to the cost of the monument, this will be decided in the future. Discussions about this will be held later. However, one thing is certain--the monument which is finally erected must leave a lasting impression upon the American public. In order to attain this, there is only need of good will, desire and patriotic understanding of this project.

    Therefore, in the name of the Kosciusko Monument Fund Committee, I appeal to you, brothers, as spring brings with it better times, to think anew about the monument for our hero, Thaddeus Kosciusko. This action will cover our nationality with honor before the American public, and will act as a manifestation before our enemies; for although Poland has been in captivity for a century her indomitable spirit has not been defeated--rather it is reviving through sacrifices and patriotism made by her children on strange soil.

    6

    Let us become active, brothers! During this year of national mourning when the thought of ostentatious social celebration has been set aside in our patriotic hearts which are filled with this tragic loss far beyond the seas [1895 was set aside by the Poles to commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the third partition of Poland], let us turn our hearts to reminiscences of Poland and the fostering of Polish spirit in America at the various planned national affairs, lectures, etc., and remember the Kosciusko Monument Fund drive. Let everyone contribute several pennies for this noble cause. God will reward the generous donors, and the monument will stand as a manifestation of the poor Polish refugees in America.

    In the name of the Kosciusko Monument Fund Committee,

    Zbigniew Brodowski, president

    (The following announcement was received by Dziennik Chicagoski for publication.) Chicago, February 26, 1895. A few years ago a large number of people got together and proposed the building of ...

    Polish
    II C, IV, III H, I A 2 a, II B 2 b, III B 3 a, II B 2 d 1
  • Zgoda -- July 15, 1897
    The First Polish Photography School That Was Establishsed in America

    Our popular Polish artist, better known to us as the "King of all Polish photographers". Mr. John W. Idzikowski, opened a photography school at 433 Milwaukee Avenue, here in Chicago.

    Mr. Idzikowski's aim is that the Poles, who care for a career in this branch of art, can assure themselves of being well-tutored here for their future, when they seek better positions in the art of photography.

    At present there are three Polish photographers, while in other nationalities we find hundreds, as for instance we have 445 German photographers, 305 Italians, 210 French, and 150 Irish.

    We wish Mr. Idzikowski the best of luck and success and support his aspiration--working for the benefit of the Poles, that being his aim.

    Our popular Polish artist, better known to us as the "King of all Polish photographers". Mr. John W. Idzikowski, opened a photography school at 433 Milwaukee Avenue, here in Chicago. ...

    Polish
    II A 2, II B 2 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 17, 1900
    A Magnanimous Offer

    Alderman C. F. Gunther announced his intention to donate to the City of Chicago his entire collection of civil war relics. This collection with other curiosities form an exhibit which is the only one of its kind in the United States.

    But this exquisite gift has to be housed in a building yet to be erected. The stipulation was that a museum at the cost of about $100,000 should be built in Garfield Park. The Libby Prison exhibition, is also included in his collection.

    Alderman C. F. Gunther announced his intention to donate to the City of Chicago his entire collection of civil war relics. This collection with other curiosities form an exhibit which ...

    German
    II B 2 b, IV
  • Lietuva -- December 28, 1900
    The Lietuva Editorial Staff Wishes to its Readers Happy New Years the End of the Century (Synopsis)

    The century is ending but it has brought nothing good to us. In the past centuries many nations have been enslaved, but the oppressors have not dared to suppress the language of the common people. Only Russia dared shamelessly to suppress the native language of the Lithuanians.

    Of course the oppressors are brave when the oppressed have no unity among themselves to demand justice. At the ending of this century we have no unity among us, just fights and discrimination. If we will stop the fights amongst us, and work together for the cause of culture, even the oppressor will stop persecuting us.

    Let us find out who stops the national activity and culture among the Lithuanian people in America. We have built many churches, but nothing 2better. Up to the present we are still building the churches. Other civilized nations besides churches have schools, theaters, libraries, museums and concert halls. The nation that has such institutions stands on a higher degree of civilization and lives better. This proves that such institutions are more important than the churches. The Lithuanians have many churches, but we cannot call them national institutions because they bring no benefit to Lithuanians.

    In the last century we were very anxious only about the churches and the priests' affairs. Indeed, we put them on a high basis, as our priests should have a good material background, but unfortunately they do not uplift the masses of Lithuanians culturally or materially. The clergy planted hypocrisy, hate and fighting among us; otherwise we could have lived in peace like cultured people.

    In the coming century, besides the churches, let us take into consideration cultural activity. Let us have more schools. We have seen 3the clergy rule for the last several hundred years. They have brought nothing good to the human race, merely misery, exploitation and oppression. The clergy cared only to accumulate wealth for themselves while the masses lived on the edge of starvation and always in fear.

    The century is ending but it has brought nothing good to us. In the past centuries many nations have been enslaved, but the oppressors have not dared to suppress the ...

    Lithuanian
    III C, II B 2 b, II B 2 a, II B 1 c 1, I A 1 a