The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 26, 1862
    Quarterly Report of the President of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein (Published at the request of the Verein)

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has received a copy. As far as we can judge at this time, the Verein will do well under it. The finances of the Verein are in good condition. The library of the Verein has been enlarged considerably, and the members have contributed their share to charity. It is hardly necessary to remind the members that the Verein is obligated to participate in every good work. Thus far, the organization has a good record in this respect.

    The following contributions were made for benevolent purposes during the past six months:

    2

    For Hecker's Regiment.....................$ 50.00

    For the wives of Union soldiers.......... 205.00

    For sick and wounded soldiers............ 50.00

    Total.........................................$305.00

    I thank the members and friends of the Verein who have assisted in obtaining these contributions.

    Disbursements for Library

    For periodicals:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...........$ 35.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862................... 37.00

    Total.....................................................$ 72.00

    3

    For books and binding:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...$135.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862............. 88.00

    Total.............................................$223.00

    If the library of a society may be considered a barometer of the educational standing of the members, we can view our shelves and cases with great satisfaction, since we have purchased the works of Dickens, Sir Walter Scott, Feuerbach, Hacklaender, Freiligrath, Cooper, Auerbach, Spindler, etc. The report of the librarian shows that our members are making good use of this source of education.

    The English night school which our Verein maintains for the benefit of the members has been in session regularly throughout the winter, which shows that our members also appreciate this opportunity to acquire knowledge. And the attendance would certainly have been much larger if the school were more 4centrally located, and if many had not been prevented by business, work, etc. from attending the school.

    The Verein also provided for the choral section. The entertainment given for the benefit of our singers netted $47.72, and this sum was turned over to the treasurer with the express understanding that he use the money to purchase music, etc.

    Fortunately, there were not many cases of sickness among the members; we seldom had more than three cases at a time, and there were no deaths.

    Our affiliation with the Peoria Arbeiter-Verein, should it materialize, will be the first step in our endeavor to spread the principles laid down in our constitution. It is desirable that our members who make their homes in other cities try to organize an Arbeiterverein there, using our constitution as a model, so that eventually anyone who leaves Chicago and settles in some other city will find an affiliated society in which he may become a member, and thus continue to 5receive the benefits which he now enjoys as a member of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein.

    Our Sunday evening entertainments have always been very well attended. It would be a great advantage to the members if the committee on lectures could provide for a lecture every two weeks. Besides stimulating the mind and increasing the knowledge of ambitious members and their friends, such lectures would, in my opinion, be the best means of getting rid of the class of people that thinks only of itself and its amusement and gives no thought to the responsibility which the Verein assumes when it arranges for this kind of entertainment. Let no one say that these people are afflicted with boredom only at certain lectures. The fact is that they are bored at every serious lecture. That was proved at the lecture on the death of Lovejoy, a martyr to the cause of liberty. Fortunately, there are only a few who place little value on education, and the sooner these people cease coming to our hall when serious topics are discussed, the better it will be for all concerned. And even if the subject matter is above the mental capacity of some of those who come to the meeting place of the Verein, they ought 6to have manners enough not to disturb those who want to listen, and should show enough respect for the lecturer to be quiet at least while he is speaking.....

    At the last meeting, the members elected a committee which has the duty of obtaining fuel at less than retail cost. I have a recommendation to make in regard to this matter. The Verein has some money in a bank. How about using it to buy fuel at wholesale for the benefit of members, and the treasury of the Verein? If each member should save only fifty cents by buying a ton of coal from the Verein, and the Verein should realize seventy-five cents on the transaction, the member would have a substantial saving, and, with coal at four dollars per ton, the Verein's money would have an earning capacity as follows:

    Net profit on investment $100 $18.75
    " " " " 400 75.00
    " " " " 533 100.00
    7

    That certainly is more than a bank pays, or can pay. And that is but three fifths of the entire profit, since the fifty cents saved by the purchaser must be considered also. Thus, if we would invest the whole of our bank balance ($533), the entire profit would be $100 for the Verein and $66.66 for the members. That would be a gain of 311/4 per cent, and the danger of loss would be eliminated because all transactions would be for cash only. I recommend that the Verein give this matter serious consideration.

    At the end of the last quarter the membership of the Verein was 389, a gain of 49.

    I have the great pleasure of informing you that a much friendlier spirit now prevails in our business meetings. When there is debating, it is done with less bitterness, and without sarcastic references to individuals. Thus the spirit of brotherhood is growing stronger, and as long as it asserts its power, the Verein will flourish.

    Theodor Hielscher,

    President of Chicago Arbeiter-Verein

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has ...

    German
    II D 1, I A 3, II D 10, II B 1 a, II B 2 g, II B 2 f, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 10, 1863
    The Chicago Arbeiterverein Third Quarterly Report of the President

    I take great pleasure in submitting my quarterly report; and I wish to congratulate the members upon the favorable standing of the society. Not only has the membership greatly increased and the fund for widows and orphans received sufficient contributions to put it on a sound basis, but also the state of health of the members, the progress made during the past months, and the general financial condition of our organization have been extremely gratifying.

    In regard to the financial report, I wish to call your attention to the fact that our financial condition ought to be of great interest to every member who has the welfare of the Arbeiterverein at heart; and each one must derive great satisfaction from the improved condition of our treasury. During my term of office it has been my constant object to observe the utmost 2economy in making expenditures.

    The funds of the society have been augmented, especially through payments to the treasury for widows and orphans, as may be seen from the report of the treasurer. Although under normal conditions we could have expected an increase in our net income, since we now have a larger number of members, our treasury balance is no greater than usual, because we were forced to assume greater obligations toward some of our members and also toward nonmembers. The greater part of our income was used to relieve the distress of widows, orphans, and dependents of soldiers. I take great pride in stating that the society has always shown a true spirit of benevolence, and has done much to make life more endurable for the poor and helpless. It has never permitted economy to restrict its charitable activity. And the general public has rendered valuable aid.

    During the past quarter the membership has risen to 935; 110 new members 3were added to our roll, and 33 were stricken from the membership list for nonpayment of dues. While this information gives us cause to rejoice, we should exercise greater care in the future when accepting members, since quite a few of those who were lately admitted to membership have not met their obligations, and joined merely for sake of the aid which our members receive.

    Financial Report

    Balance, February 23, 1863 $1,352.30
    Balance, May 22, 1863 2,391.12
    Quarterly receipts for dues, etc 1,810.65
    Special contributions 908.13
    Total $2,718.78
    Quarterly disbursements 1,679.96
    Balance $1,038.82
    4
    Sick benefits paid $219.00
    For support of dependents of soldiers 77.00
    For support of dependents of poor 42.00
    Funeral expenses 42.50
    For nurse 6.75
    Current expenses 1,288.71
    Total $1,675.96

    Widow and Orphan Fund

    Balance February 22, 1863 $151.00
    Payments up to March 31 824.00
    Monthly dues 288.59
    Contributions 77.00
    Total $1,340.59
    5
    Disbursements 28.25
    Balance $1,282.25 (sic)
    Deposited in bank 2,217.25
    In treasury 173.77
    Total $2,702.06 (sic)

    Recapitulation

    Total receipts $2,718.78
    Total disbursements 1,670.96
    Balance $1,037.82

    Widows and Orphans Fund

    6
    Receipts, February 22 to May 22 $1,301.50
    Disbursements 28.25
    Balance $1,273.25

    Since the available money of the society was used for charitable purposes, little could be done for our library, which was used by many to promote their education. We have 740 books, most of them on science. Though we have spent quite a bit of money to increase the efficiency of our library, there is still much room for improvement; for there is an ever greater demand for good instructive books. In the future we shall give this phase of our activity more attention.

    Our chorus is under the leadership of an able director and is making good progress. It has contributed much toward the success of our Sunday evening entertainments. However, it is desirable that more of our members participate 7in the activity of this branch of our organization--for their own benefit, and for the benefit of those who have not been endowed with "good" voices, but enjoy good vocal music.

    Concerning our school for instruction in English and free-hand drawing I wish to inform you that the society found it expedient to discontinue sessions during the summer; however this work will be resumed when cooler weather sets in, and will be under the supervision of an able instructor, thus affording every member an opportunity to acquire a knowledge of the English language--and every citizen of the United States should know English--and of the art of drawing. This latter branch was introduced for the benefit of those who desire to obtain technical knowledge. Unfortunately, past attendance was not very good. Let us take advantage of this facility, even though we may never expect to make regular use of what we learn about the art of technical drawing.

    8

    In my last report I recommended that the society erect a hall suitable for the purposes of the society, assuming that our fellow citizens will assist in this worthy enterprise. Our organization is growing rapidly because its activity has made it very popular, and that fact, too, should be considered when we face the problem of obtaining the money to pay for a building adequate to our needs. The Arbeiterverein is firmly convinced that the Germans of Chicago will not be found wanting in their contributions for this worthy cause, but will take great pride in assisting to erect a monument to German unity, industry, and charity.

    In conclusion, I wish to thank you for the confidence which you have shown during the past quarter, and for your generous and willing aid in the performance of my duties. Though it was impossible to please everybody, I assure you that it was my constant aim to promote the welfare of our society. I shall continue to keep this purpose in mind, and I hope that 9none of the members will be guided or controlled by petty jealousy or unjustified dissatisfaction, which might cause others to think ill of and belittle our organization.

    A. Braun, President.

    Chicago, May 27, 1863

    I take great pleasure in submitting my quarterly report; and I wish to congratulate the members upon the favorable standing of the society. Not only has the membership greatly increased ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 2 f, II B 1 a, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 30, 1866
    Of Chicago Arbeiterverein

    Chicago, Illinois, March 21, 1866.

    To the Honorable Board of police Commissioners of the city of Chicago: The Chicago Arbeiterverein has elected the undersigned to act as a committee for the purpose of bringing about an understanding with your honorable Board, in regard to certain issues, and we beg permission to present the following matters:

    Through the newspapers and other sources of information we have learned that the members of two other societies, or associations, have been informed that they must discontinue their recreational activities on Sunday evenings. Of course, the Arbeiterverein has nothing to do with the recreation of other organizations, nor do we wish to express our opinions concerning the motives for the Board's action against these societies. However, during the past few weeks, one of these periodic religious movements, generally called "revivals," 2has been in process, and the Chicago Arbeiterverein, always intent upon avoiding any offense against citizen who differ with our religious opinions, takes the view that during the past eight years (the past four under police protection) these "revivals," usually held on Sunday evenings, have taken the form of a kind of social entertainment (sic). Therefore, we ask: Does the above mentioned notice also apply to our organization?

    We are aware that you have the right to answer: Wait until you receive notice; but, as loyal citizens, we would not like to offend against any law, nor would we like to suffer the consequences of not knowing the law, nor do we want our members to be taken by surprise by a policeman and disturbed in their innocent and harmless amusements which are in complete accord with the religious liberty guar-anteed by the Constitution, nor do we need an excuse to be provided to make us responsible for an offense against any state law that is in agreement with the spirit of the Constitution,

    Should our social entertainments be prohibited by order of your Board, we would respectfully point cut that in 1861 the Board of Police Commissioners entered 3into the following pact with the president of our society:

    1. The President will be responsible for the maintenance of order, and the police shall not interfere with our social entertainment;

    2. No brass musical instruments shall be used at such entertainments, out of respect for the religious convictions of our fellow citizens, and one or more violins, but only one flute, bass violin, or piano shall be used.

    3. The police will not consider these entertainments to be "illegal," as long as the concerts and dances do not disturb the neighborhood.

    The Arbeiterverein has strictly observed these conditions despite contradictions by a newspaper, the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, two part owners of which were expelled from the organization on account of their loud, mischievous conduct; they even went so far as to break up one of our public meetings and to slander everybody who did not agree with their arrogant opinions.

    We trust that your honorable Board will pay no attention to the malicious 4utterances which these "snakes" publish against our society. Had they conducted themselves in an orderly manner, they would still be members of our society.

    We do not advertise our entertainments, nor do we invite strangers to participate in them. We have a Committee on Order and a Committee of Ushers who admit only members or strangers who are accompanied or invited by members, and the members must give their word of honor that they can vouch for and will be responsible for the behavior of these strangers.

    The money which is realized through our entertainments is the property of the organization and is used for defraying the expenses incurred by maintaining our library and reading room, and for the support of sick members or their dependent widows and orphans.

    [Translator's note: The next (final) paragraph of this article has evidently 5been "removed" by rats or mice, so it is not possible to offer a translation.]

    We hope most sincerely that you will permit the Arbeiterverein to continue its Sunday evening entertainments under the conditions which were previously agreed upon.

    Very respectfully,

    C. Degenhardt,

    C. Haussner,

    T. Hielscher,

    Ed. Schlaeger.

    Chicago, Illinois, March 21, 1866. To the Honorable Board of police Commissioners of the city of Chicago: The Chicago Arbeiterverein has elected the undersigned to act as a committee for ...

    German
    I B 2, III B 2, II D 10, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 30, 1867
    For Tradesmen, Mechanics, and Artists "The Patent Law of the United States," and the "Scientific Americans" are two of the best illustrated periodicals for mechanics.

    Eduard Buehler,

    Book Store and Rental Library,

    lll Monroe Street.

    [Translator's note: This advertisement was translated because of the reference to a rental library. From all appearances this was one of the first rental libraries in the city of Chicago, if not the first. After having exhausted all sources of research available at Newberry Library, I find no information that a rental library existed here prior to the year 1867. Probably Mr. Buehler had books on mechanics which were not to be had on the local market, but which were in great demand at the time, and found it more profitable to rent them for a consideration than to sell them.]

    Eduard Buehler, Book Store and Rental Library, lll Monroe Street. [Translator's note: This advertisement was translated because of the reference to a rental library. From all appearances this was one ...

    German
    II A 2, II B 2 a, II B 2 d 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 03, 1871
    [The Committee of the German Library Association]

    The meeting that was called by Messrs. Kihlholz and Dyrenfurth, or, as they call themselves: the Committee of the German Library Association, was as well attended by representatives of Chicago Germandom, in all social and professional stratas, as a meeting has ever been. It is all the more to be regretted that Mr. Kihlholz and Mr. Dyrenfurth declared themselves not to want nor to be able to yield to the resolutions of the meeting. The discussion became very acrid apropos of the selection of a chairman of the meeting and of the question of delegate credentials. It then turned out that the German American Library Association, consisting only of its two committee members, after the resignation of a Mr. Johnson, had sent a circular to German publishers asking for books for a German-American library in Chicago. Now they regarded the creation of such a library as an obligation toward the German publishers. Mr. Kihlholz, also, had done a great deal of work, incurred considerable expense, and now held the books. Later than the so-called German-American Library Association was formed, which promised to add German books to the Public Library but had done nothing and achieved nothing, so Mr. Kihlholz said, and was dominated by half of a dozen politicians, and now arrogated to itself the power to dispose of what others had worked hard to bring together.

    2

    In addition, the German Library Association, in his opinion, the present meeting had been packed and so, Mr. Kihlholz declared in advance that he would not abide by its resolutions. Mr. Wiel of the Chicago Turn Community, Franz Roesch of the Germania and Concordia Male Choir, Max Eberhardt and Mr. Hesing spoke at length against Mr. Kihlholz' arguments.

    Mr. Rosenthal spoke for the Public Library, promising that it would contain everything that a German private library could contain. "For this library, books that could not be bought for hundreds of thousands of dollars had been contributed from England. This library is intended to be a monument of the friendship of the nations and I, as a German, would be ashamed to have to tell the directory of which I am a member, that Germany excludes itself, the Germans want a library of their own, the end of this German private library would be the same as that of eight former ones. I would have to see it auctioned off. Those gentlemen have not calculated what it costs to build a library, have not thought of the building or the rent, the administrative costs or the increase."

    3

    (Mr. Rosenthal finally moved to table Mr. Roesch's motion of a vote of thanks for Messrs. Kihlholz and Dyrenfurth. Mr. Roesch, thereupon, withdrew his motion. However, a little while later Alderman Buehler renewed it).

    The well-known labor apostle, Klinks, said the Public Library would be nothing for the German worker. He could not adjust himself to American habits. One should first try it out with a German private library, one then still would be free to do as one wanted.

    The motion of Mr. Buehler was tabled, and the motion of Mr. Horwitz adopted with 34 to 25 votes, (to turn the books over to the Municipal Library).

    The rest of the meeting was exceedingly stormy. Six or seven members of the International, who were present and had been unable to get the floor, especially the President of the Chicago section, Mr. Simpel, shouted about terrorism, bourgeois, library, etc.

    4

    Mr. Dyrenfurth declared that he did not recognize the meeting and would call another one. A motion of Mr. Seibel to inform the German book trade and the German public in general of the resolutions, and to explain to them the right of the meeting to represent the Germans of Chicago - brought Mr. Kihlholz once more to the fore. He heaped accusations on the meeting, and declared that he felt contempt for it. His consolation was, he said, that the books were stored in Leipzig and that they would remain there until disposition was made.

    MR. SIEBEL'S MOTION WAS ADOPTED.

    Mr. Hesing finally refuted the assertions of Mr. Kihlholz that the meeting was under the leadership of politicians, and showed the members of the International, who clamored that here, too, the interests of the workers were being slighted, how senseless their arguments were. After a session of four hours the meeting was finally closed, but the discussion continued in the lobby.

    The meeting that was called by Messrs. Kihlholz and Dyrenfurth, or, as they call themselves: the Committee of the German Library Association, was as well attended by representatives of Chicago ...

    German
    II B 2 a, III B 2, III A, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 10, 1871
    [The German Society]

    In the last twelve months the German Society has undergone great and splendid transformations. From a crippled state in which it languished without strength even to die, it has filled itself again with fresh and promising life. Even its outside appearance has now become highly respectable. The new place in Washington street is large, light, and attractively furnished. It consists of an office and a writing room in which there is a library for immigrants. Dr. Engelhardt and Mr. Julius Rosenthal have given books. Copies of several newspapers from Chicago, as well as outside, lie on the table.

    The board now consists of men who understand that one must give the only German purely benevolent association more than passing attention, and one can now find daily, the president and some of the directors in the office. The board consists of George Schneider, president; Jacob Beiersdorff, vice-president; Herman Lieb, secretary; Henry Biroth, treasurer; Julius Rosenthal, M. Berg, Louis Wahl, H. Claussenius, W. Hettich, Arthur Erbe, Fritz Rieta, H. Enderis, and Carl Tarnow, directors.

    2

    The board has recently been successful in impressing upon the city officials that they must pay greater attention to the interests of the society. The police commissioners have made an agreement with the railroad that they will announce ahead of time the coming of German immigrant trains, so that one or more German policemen can be sent to the stations where they arrive.

    The Parmalee Bus Company has finally yielded to the energetic protests of the board and promised not only to refund money in future when it can be proven that conductors of the company have mistreated the immigrants but also to employ some German conductors.

    Since April 7, the day when the constitution was amended, women also are admitted as full fledged members and can therefore also be elected to the board. The first ladies received as members are: Frau Louise Degenhardt, Ivan Jacob Beiersdorff, and Miss Clara Schneider.

    In the last twelve months the German Society has undergone great and splendid transformations. From a crippled state in which it languished without strength even to die, it has filled ...

    German
    II D 10, IV, III G, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 12, 1871
    [American Literacy]

    Some decades ago the Frenchman Tocqueville, the famed author of the book Democracy in America said:"In no country of the world are there so few ignoramuses and so few scholars as in the United States, and in no country are there so many ignoramuses and so many scholars as in Germany. Even though in the formulation of this apothegm the ignorance of the French regarding everything German, and the French addiction to clever antithesis and sparkling paradox may have been active, yet it must be confessed that one might still find a kernel of truth in it. The American moves from early youth on in conditions that awaken the mind; he reads newspapers and many books; he listens to orators and public lectures. One has built here veritable altars to common sense.

    Not so the Germans. The idealistic tendency that is, one might say, inborn to them, carries them all too often away from reality; their shying away from public life has been overcome only in the last few years; the German newspapers are mostly to be thanked for having brought that about. The growth of the latter(in this city particularly of the Staats Zeitung) bears witness to the fact that the German-Americans slowly begin to assimilate 2the good and beautiful things of the native Americans. One thing, however, of which the Americans have cause to be proud, the Germans in this country have not yet imitated...

    The Germans in this city who count among their fellow citizens men who would do honor to the biggest and best educated cities in the German homeland, should take the initiative in the building of a big, German public library. It is true, essays in this direction have been made before; years and years ago a German reading association existed in this city, and the Workers Association had a library that though it contained only fiction, enjoyed a large and faithful circle of readers.

    Perhaps, it was that the struggle for existence at that time-15 or 20 years ago- was not favorable for literary tendencies; or that the divisions among the Germans that now, happily, have largely been overcome, made a big united enterprise impossible, - at any rate the reading association had to auction off its books to pay its rent, (and the library of the Worker's Association that was burned some time ago has not yet been able to attain again its initial achievements.)

    3

    A committee of eminent, energetic and well educated Germans should be formed...That the plan would succeed we do not doubt in view of the unity and intelligence of the Germans here. Such a library would not only have a splendid influence on the Germans but on the Americans, too. To mention only one thing, one could force the American libraries, to keep also Sundays open for the reading public. In that way more would be done to stop the loitering around, shooting and public disorder than is accomplished by the police...How many German youths who now sit on Sundays mostly in the beerhall would not be happy to spend this time instead in a library with studies and pleasure-reading...

    (Footnote: This article is probably a reader's contribution).

    Some decades ago the Frenchman Tocqueville, the famed author of the book Democracy in America said:"In no country of the world are there so few ignoramuses and so few scholars ...

    German
    II B 2 a, I C, V A 2, II B 2 d 3, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 29, 1871
    [Germany and the Chicago Fire]

    A cablegram yesterday said that the notables of London want to give Chicago a valuable library. Disraeli, Foster, Argyle, Carlyle and others have promised to cooperate. A gift of that type would be today more welcome to Chicago than ever before. From Germany one has not heard, that anybody is even aware of the intellectual needs of the 100,000 Germans in Chicago....almost all private and club libraries have been burnt, and if we are not to get an intellectual proletariat (footnote: this expression is here obviously used in a different sense in which it is commonly used today), something unusual and on a large scale must be done with the help of our whole country and our co-nationals in Europe.

    ... The Chicago Germans have so far done nothing toward the creation of a library. All that has happened is that the book stores and lending libraries, with the exception of one, have lost their supply. There is not the slightest chance that a German Reading Association will be formed. Our Chicago Germans will give individually and collectively - not a cent for the purpose of adult education, except in the form of a general tax that the city might raise for the founding and upkeep of a free public library.

    A cablegram yesterday said that the notables of London want to give Chicago a valuable library. Disraeli, Foster, Argyle, Carlyle and others have promised to cooperate. A gift of that ...

    German
    III H, I C, III A, II B 2 a, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 30, 1871
    [German Jews and Christlans Cooperate in Rebuilding a Free Public Library]

    Yesterday's notice in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung regarding the urgent necessity of a public free library for Chicago has caused several Chicago Germans to give this question the attention it deserves. Dr. Chronik offers to work out with others an appeal to the German publishers - which he, with his considerable experience as a writer in Germany, thinks might be successful.

    We here reprint a clipping from the Illinois Staats-Zeitung from December 5, 1867.

    The Founding of a library and an Educational Association among the Israelites, without exclusion of the Christians..........

    Israelites! Will you collaborate with me, to found an Association with two aims: to further Jewish science, and to promote a nobler society.

    To attain the first, a library of ancient and modern Jewish literature, including the periodical, shall be founded....In creating it we would already be on our way, also toward the second aim, which is a nobler form of social intercourse.....

    2

    Israelites! I appeal to all of you, without difference between the old and the new persuasion...Because as Jews you will all have to confess: that the love of science is a religious love, and that the ennobled social intercourse is a fact of religion.

    Because you are all made equally answerable by your religion for the increase of knowledge and the uplift of social virtues.

    Just because the whole of Jewry has been split by the divergency between the old and the new religious viewpoints, it would be twice as valuable to work in a field of unified effort.

    Men and women, fathers and mothers, sons and daughters! For self-evident reasons the cultivation of knowledge and the purification of good fellowship is in this country more urgently needed than abroad.....

    Israelites! Very well, let us then unfurl the banner of science in a nobler fellowship, with the just pride that this is the banner of our religion, - and 3even those who are not of Israel will join us. Chicago, December 5, 1867. Signed: Rabbi Dr. Chronik.

    The Chicago Israelites live spiritually with the Germans (Die niesigen Israeliten leben geistig mit den Deutschen und sind micht gesonnen fur sich eine separate Bibliothek zu grunden) and have no desire to found a separate library for themselves; least of all now, after the colossal fire losses and the destruction of most of their prayer houses and schools.

    The Chicago Tribune of yesterday carried a leading article, three-quarters of a column in length, under the heading: Demanded a public library....

    As a matter of course, the Tribune thinks only of its own people, that is to say, the American-born English population. However, when the law is being written, the Germans, Scandinavians and Catholic Irish, who have to share anyway in bearing the cost, should be taken into consideration, in proportion to their numbers. Otherwise, we will again get a sectional institute in place of a cosmopolitan one; Chicago needs it both for its permanent and its transient population.

    Yesterday's notice in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung regarding the urgent necessity of a public free library for Chicago has caused several Chicago Germans to give this question the attention it deserves. ...

    German
    II B 2 a, I C, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 06, 1871
    [Butz' Library Suffers Loss]

    We see, to our joy, that steps are being taken in St. Louis, to help Mr. Caspar Butz, whose exquisite library was burnt, replace his loss. The German papers in St. Louis publish the following appeal:

    Caspar Butz in Chicago has lost everything in the Chicago fire. For him, our countryman, who is equally distinguished by his charm, his character and his talent, and whose poetic works belong among the noblest flowers of German-American literature, a very special sympathy could not fail to develop. And this sympathy must grow still further in view of the fact that among the things the poet lost, there was also his library - a loss, that so painfully can afflict only the writer....(the three papers, Westliche Post, Anzeiger des Westen and the Belleville Stern des Westens", then go on soliciting contributions of books and money).

    We (says the Staats-Zeitung) cannot let pass this occasion without coming back to the previously recommended founding of a German Library in Chicago 2and to appeal to the publishing and the general world. A better chance to create an institute that already before the fire was so painfully needed, will not recur. Who will take the important matter into his hand?

    We see, to our joy, that steps are being taken in St. Louis, to help Mr. Caspar Butz, whose exquisite library was burnt, replace his loss. The German papers in ...

    German
    II B 1 e, III A, II B 2 a