The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 06, 1871
    [Butz' Library Suffers Loss]

    We see, to our joy, that steps are being taken in St. Louis, to help Mr. Caspar Butz, whose exquisite library was burnt, replace his loss. The German papers in St. Louis publish the following appeal:

    Caspar Butz in Chicago has lost everything in the Chicago fire. For him, our countryman, who is equally distinguished by his charm, his character and his talent, and whose poetic works belong among the noblest flowers of German-American literature, a very special sympathy could not fail to develop. And this sympathy must grow still further in view of the fact that among the things the poet lost, there was also his library - a loss, that so painfully can afflict only the writer....(the three papers, Westliche Post, Anzeiger des Westen and the Belleville Stern des Westens", then go on soliciting contributions of books and money).

    We (says the Staats-Zeitung) cannot let pass this occasion without coming back to the previously recommended founding of a German Library in Chicago 2and to appeal to the publishing and the general world. A better chance to create an institute that already before the fire was so painfully needed, will not recur. Who will take the important matter into his hand?

    We see, to our joy, that steps are being taken in St. Louis, to help Mr. Caspar Butz, whose exquisite library was burnt, replace his loss. The German papers in ...

    German
    II B 1 e, III A, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1876
    [The Activities of the German Literary Association]

    The German Literary Association of the Chicago Atheneum gave a presentation yesterday in its building of "The Diplomat", by Scribe and Delavigne. The actors were Americans who had taken lessons in German. In a short time they have made much progress. Although their pronunciation betrayed several of them, their fluent expression was excellent. Mr. Ullmann and Miss Bushnell deserve special praise. This is the first attempt made by Americans and the results were most satisfactory. Special recognition is due to Mr. Groh, teacher of the German language who gave the impetus to this presentation.

    The German Literary Association of the Chicago Atheneum gave a presentation yesterday in its building of "The Diplomat", by Scribe and Delavigne. The actors were Americans who had taken lessons ...

    German
    II B 1 c 1, I C, I A 1 b, III B 2, II B 1 e
  • Svornost -- June 03, 1878
    [Reading Club Commemorates the Death of Voltaire]

    The Reading Club commemorated the one hundredth Anniversary of the death of Voltaire, exhibiting a large portrait of him and reading several of his shorter works. Because of rain, attendance was small.

    We were much surprised at the skill of our young and modest artist, Miss M. Koupalove.

    Using a small portrait as a model, she completed, in two hours, a large painting for the club. She is certainly deserving of recognition and encourgement to proceed to further success.

    The Reading Club commemorated the one hundredth Anniversary of the death of Voltaire, exhibiting a large portrait of him and reading several of his shorter works. Because of rain, attendance ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 d, IV, II B 1 e, II B 1 b
  • Jewish Advance -- June 21, 1878
    (No headline)

    Rev. Dr. K. Kohler of this city has published a new material translation of The Song of Songs, in German.

    The scholar will find in every footnote a remark speaking volumes on the capacity and scholarly research of the author...... The author being a personal and highly esteemed friend of ours, it would be impossible for us to give an impartial criticism of his work.

    Rev. Dr. K. Kohler of this city has published a new material translation of The Song of Songs, in German. The scholar will find in every footnote a remark speaking ...

    Jewish
    IV, II B 1 e
  • Jewish Advance -- August 16, 1878
    (No headline)

    The pamphlet entitled "Zur Proselitenfrage" (To the Problem of Proselytism) which has been recently published by Rev. Dr. B. Felsenthal of this city, has been copied entire, including even the "Nachtraegliche Bemerkungen" (After-Thoughts), in the Neuzeit of Vienna.

    The pamphlet entitled "Zur Proselitenfrage" (To the Problem of Proselytism) which has been recently published by Rev. Dr. B. Felsenthal of this city, has been copied entire, including even the ...

    Jewish
    II B 1 e, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 30, 1879
    "Poems by a German-American"

    Such is the unassuming title of a work of more than three hundred pages. The book contains an almost complete collection of Caspar But'z poems. The author is a Chicagoan.

    We have few poets here. Poetry, somehow, does not thrive on our American soil, and among our German-Americans there are only a few who excel. Caspar Butz belongs to this small group. It appears that fate selected him, in this land of sordid materialism, to carry on German tradition, and to remain undismayed by environment. His book gives ample evidence that he ardently dedicated himself to his work.

    Every page shows inspiration and rare talent, and betrays his nostalgia for his homeland and foreign ideals, but also gives the impressions his newly adopted country has made upon his discerning mind. A true German-American, who professes profound enthusiasm for liberty as exemplified by America, and yet 2bears reverence to his native heath! He speaks of the Rhine and the vintages, the red soil, and memories of the long ago; of Germany's awakening and unity, the insolence of France and its vanquished armies, of Germany's victory and rise.

    Many of his poems deal with our Civil War of 1861-65, and give a vivid picture of that period.

    Here is a versatile work in which are recorded the observations of a quarter-century.

    We hope that this will not be the author's only work.

    Such is the unassuming title of a work of more than three hundred pages. The book contains an almost complete collection of Caspar But'z poems. The author is a Chicagoan. ...

    German
    II B 2 d 3, IV, II B 1 e
  • Svornost -- December 20, 1881
    Vaclav Denoch

    Vaclav Lenoch, died in the county hospital in Milwaukee, Wis. He was widely known in Bohemian-American circles as one of our foremost actors. He was born in 1846 and came to America in 1869, living in Chicago intermittently. About two years ago he moved to Racine and from there to Milwaukee.

    The theatre was his universe; all his powers, all his existence and his very life were dedicated to the theatre. How well he knew the theatre! With his comedy he caused tears and laughter, and with his tragedy, tears of sorrow and city. Vaclav Lenoch was uncommonly talented in many ways; he painted, wrote, translated and composed poetry. Our foremost post, V. Snajdr, praised several of Lenoch's poems and published them in his paper.

    Lenoch was a contributor to "Ducha Casus and to "Svornost": he translated the theatrical play, "Robert and Bertram", and in other ways took part in our nationalistic movement.

    Vaclav Lenoch, died in the county hospital in Milwaukee, Wis. He was widely known in Bohemian-American circles as one of our foremost actors. He was born in 1846 and came ...

    Bohemian
    IV, II B 1 e, II A 3 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 13, 1890
    Emil Dietzsch

    Chicago his lost one of its most illustrious and popular Germans, one who undoubtedly anticipated a long life, because of his virility. Several weeks ago he fell on the steps of the County Building, injuring his head, and after suffering severely he died from the after effects.

    Emil Dietzsch was born April seventh, 1829, at Edenkoben, in the Bavarian Rheinpfalz, Germany. He obtained a thorough education at a Gymnasium, (German form of advanced high school quasi University), studied the elememtary apothecary's course as prescribed in his native district, studied pharmacy and its allied sciences at the University of Monacco (Muenchen), and became Provisor in drug stores, after his successful examination. We find him, a youth of twenty years, actively participating in the political constitutional reforms of the government, for the betterment of his homeland. He then obtained a position as provisor with one of the foremost apothecaries of Stuttgart. In 1853, Mr. Dietzsch emigrated to America. He eventually came to Chicago, then 2to Burlington, Iowa, where he was active in his chosen field. He returned to this city, opening a garden restaurant in the vicinity of Clark and Chestnut Streets, which was still a prairie in those days. At this period he became known through his humorous poems about local conditions and personages. Soon after, he owned a drug store on Blue Island Avenue and later acquired a partnership in a larger establishment, at the corner of Clark and Kinzie Streets.

    At the time of the Chicago holocaust of 1871 he was a wine merchant. His business perished. In 1874, the Populist party proposed him as candidate for coroner. He was elected and re-elected, two years later, by a great majority. He came to the apex of his fortune during that year. Later, fortune proved less liberal. For several years he was Deputy Sheriff, managed a drug store for a brief interval at the corner of Clark and Ohio Streets, became manager of the great Kern restaurant, and finally held a position in the County Clerk's office. However, Emil Dietzsch's importance to Chicago is not found so much in his various business and official activities, as in his literary pursuits and as a public speaker. For many years he was one of the most popular 3orators, and was welcomed as a participant in the singing fraternities. During these occasions his homespun witicism proved most auspicious. As author, he expressed himself in poetry and prose. He was most successful, however, in his forceful, humorous poems written in the high, unadulterated, German language, and his native southern dialect.

    But even in his serious poetical creations we find valuable gems, which brought him the honor and pleasure of notice from the famous Johannes Scherr who published many selections in the latest edition of the "Gallery of the World's Literature". Among his prosaic works, the History of Chicago's Germanism is most valuable.

    Dietzsch was a contributor to the German-American press for years, also Puck and the Sunday edition of the Illinois Staats Zeitung. For a short time he published a humorous paper of his own. This was twenty-one years ago.

    4

    He was married twice and happily. His first wife, Ida (Garthe), died in 1875, leaving him four children. He married again in 1878. His second wife, Elizabeth (Schmidt), has been a stauneh helpmate during his affliction. He suffered from inflammation of the nerves of his hip. He left his widow and two young children.

    Although Dietzsch never visited his native hills, and had not seen them for thirty-seven long years he always professed intense nostalgia, even to his last, fleeting breath. He remained a genuine Pfaelzer (Bavarian), a true blooded representative of that jovial German people. He predicted the rise of a future Germany in his collection of poems titled, "Strength and Matter".

    Chicago his lost one of its most illustrious and popular Germans, one who undoubtedly anticipated a long life, because of his virility. Several weeks ago he fell on the steps ...

    German
    IV, III H, II A 2, III A, II B 1 e, II B 2 d 3, II B 2 d 1
  • Reform Advocate -- August 07, 1891
    ["The Pentateuch of Life"]

    One of the best selections in The Hebrew Almanac, is "The Pentateuch of Life", by Rabbi Calisch, which was taken from The Reform Advocate.

    One of the best selections in The Hebrew Almanac, is "The Pentateuch of Life", by Rabbi Calisch, which was taken from The Reform Advocate.

    Jewish
    II B 1 e
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 13, 1891
    Polish Bible

    The internal revenue collector received an invoice for an old Polish bible printed in 1563. It is a rare copy, one of the oldest Polish bibles in print, which was acquired by Mr. Gunther, a well-known downtown confectioner, for his private collection. The book will arrive at Chicago today.

    Mr. Gunther bought this bible from a certain book dealer at Frankfurt, Germany, for nine hundred German marks (about $207.00). Mr Gunther says that this Polish bible was printed at that time by order of a certain Polish gentleman, (his name is not disclosed yet) and was passed as an heirloom from generation to generation down to the last descendant of the family who was forced to pawn it on account of poverty. The gentleman, however, had never redeemed the bible; it passed from hand to hand, and is now in Mr. Gunther's possession.

    The bible may be seen in a few days at Mr. Gunther's collection room which 2is located above his confectionery shop. It seems that the bible was printed in Cracow, Poland, at the time when the first printing shop was established in that country (the first Frank Swaybold's printing shop was established in 1491).

    In other cities the printing shops were established much later. For instance, in Warsaw, it was established in 1580, and in Lemberg, in 1593. At that time, already two Polish translations of the bible existed. One was the Leopolit's translation of 1561 (this was not so very good because many Bohemian and old Slavic words were incorporated). The other one was the excellent translation of Jacob Wujek, 1540-1591. We will furnish our readers with a better description of this bible as soon as we will have an opportunity to see it.

    Mr. Gunther desires to donate his collection to the city library.

    The internal revenue collector received an invoice for an old Polish bible printed in 1563. It is a rare copy, one of the oldest Polish bibles in print, which was ...

    Polish
    II B 1 e, I B 4