The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Chicago Times -- January 30, 1875
    Thomas Paine's Birthday Anniversary Was Celebrated by the Scandinavians Yesterday.

    The Skandinaviske Frioenker Forening, or the Scandinavian Free Thinking Society, of this city, held its eighth annual celebration commemorating the 138th anniversary of the birth of Thomas Paine, last evening, at Orpheus Hall, on the corner of West Lake and Peoria Streets. The society was established nine years ago and consists at present of about one hundred members, the majority of whom are Swedes and Norwegians. They hold their regular sessions at No. 113 Milwaukee Avenue, where they meet twice a month and advocate the principles of their leader.

    About nine o'clock the hall was filled with a large representation of the Scandinavian race of both sexes, a number of the latter (women) having been attracted by the festivities which the latter part of the program offered.

    Upon the platform of the stage stood a rough representation of the Goddess of Liberty, and upon the pedestal which supported it were inscribed the words, "Friheds 2Gudinde Dit Nawn Er Godt Spred Sandheds Wisdoms Lys Fra Bol Til Bol."Goddess of Liberty, thy name is good. Spread the light of truth and wisdom from pole to pole." Over the center of the stage hung suspended a portrait of Paine, surrounded by a sketch designed to represent the American eagle, carrying in his beak the usual streamers, which bore the motto, "Frem itiden Komer Sandhedens Lys," or "In the future the light of truth will come." From the balconies on either side, the banners of the different nations represented alongside of the American flag were unfurled and the whole apartment was arranged with reference to the occasion. After an overture by the Exposition band, which furnished the music for the evening, Dr. G. Paoli, the president of the society, made an eloquent address in the Scandinavian tongue, eulogizing the founder of their principles of belief, and expressing himself as opposed to the religious doctrines propagated in this country. The president was succeeded by Gen. I.N.Stiles, whom he introduced to the audience as one of the strongest and most sincere free-thinkers in the city.

    Gen. Stiles began by stating that liberty might well point to Thomas Paine, for he was her noble son; genius might point to him also, for he was her brother. Few men 3were abused as much as he had been because he did not agree with the majority. The thinkers, the men who moved the world, always started from among the minority, and labored among the many. Paine had been calumniated because he had dared to think for himself, and had set priests at defiance. The world was his country, he said, and to do good was his religion. The speaker challenged any one to find a sentence uttered by Paine which had ever savored of immorality. He had thought for himself, and had then doubted that God could be such as Moses had described him. Nothing so delighted him (God) as a sacrifice, and what pleased Him above all things was the blood of women and children. Paine had defied the priests of the so-called Christian religion to demonstrate to him that God was a being of such atrocious cruelty. When men come to think for themselves, they no longer desired the services of a priest. The priest insisted that fixed belief should be indoctrinated in the minds of children when they were too young to use their reason. In that they were mistaken. In addition to his doctrines of free thought, Paine had advocated the principles of liberty, and aided Jefferson and Adams in establishing a republic in this country. No man had done so much to impress the American people with the importance of independent thought and action. The nineteenth century had produced her Darwin, 4her Tyndall, and her Huxley, and the time was not far distant when the people could embrace the doctrines of liberty and truth.

    Marc Trans was the next speaker. He began by giving a sketch of the life of Thomas Paine. He considered him the real founder of the republic, because the idea of liberty and free thought originated with him. Paine was not only a speaker and a writer, but an actor as well, for he had served as a soldier in defense of his country. It is Tom Paine the people should thank for the free institutions of this country, nothwithstanding the fact that the press and the pulpit had united to caluminate him; that he was not held in greater estimation did not speak well for the character of the American people.

    At the conclusion of the addresses, which were received with enthusiastic applause, the hall was cleared, and dancing succeeded, a part of the program which continued until an early hour in the morning.

    The Skandinaviske Frioenker Forening, or the Scandinavian Free Thinking Society, of this city, held its eighth annual celebration commemorating the 138th anniversary of the birth of Thomas Paine, last evening, ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 d, II B 1 d
  • Svornost -- June 03, 1878
    [Reading Club Commemorates the Death of Voltaire]

    The Reading Club commemorated the one hundredth Anniversary of the death of Voltaire, exhibiting a large portrait of him and reading several of his shorter works. Because of rain, attendance was small.

    We were much surprised at the skill of our young and modest artist, Miss M. Koupalove.

    Using a small portrait as a model, she completed, in two hours, a large painting for the club. She is certainly deserving of recognition and encourgement to proceed to further success.

    The Reading Club commemorated the one hundredth Anniversary of the death of Voltaire, exhibiting a large portrait of him and reading several of his shorter works. Because of rain, attendance ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 d, IV, II B 1 e, II B 1 b
  • Jewish Advance -- June 28, 1878
    (Resolution by Sinai Literary Society)

    "We are thankful to the Standard Club for the use of their elegant library, which has been granted us. They have a valuable selection of English and German similar journals."

    "We are thankful to the Standard Club for the use of their elegant library, which has been granted us. They have a valuable selection of English and German similar journals."

    Jewish
    II B 1 d, I E
  • Svornost -- October 07, 1878
    [Vlasta Holds First Meeting]

    First meeting of the Chicago Bohemians Women's Society "Vlasta" was held in the hall of the "Telocvicne Jednoty Sokol" yesterday and brought together quite a large number of our ladies. It was resolved that the aims of the Society are to be educational and entertaining. Sick benefits were left out entirely.

    Altogether 57 members were present and proceeded to the election of officers, which resulted as follows: Mrs. Barb. Pitt, President; Mrs. Julie Kaspar, Vice President; Mrs. Klementin Novak as Secretary; Mrs. A. Splichal as Treasurer. Miss Anna Jurkov as agent.

    New members are accepted from the age of 15 years and initiation fees are fifty cents.

    First meeting of the Chicago Bohemians Women's Society "Vlasta" was held in the hall of the "Telocvicne Jednoty Sokol" yesterday and brought together quite a large number of our ladies. ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 d
  • Svornost -- October 07, 1878
    [Literary Club Entertains]

    An informal entertainment and dance given by "Ctenarske Besedy" (The Literary Club) last Saturday turned out as we expected exceedingly well, excelling in all respects previous entertainments of the Club. At about 10 P.M. the small hall, of Tel. Jed. Sokol (Gymnastic Society Sokol) began to fill with a select Bohemian crowd and an unconstrained merriment began at once. However, at 11 P.M. the management found it necessary to move the merrymakers into the large hall so as to be able to accomodate all those present.

    Dancing was continuous till morning so that when the last dancers left the hall they were greeted by the rising Sun. The Club, through this fine entertainment, has won great favor among Chicago Bohemians and, no doubt, will thereby greatly increase its membership. We shall look forward to more such entertainments in the future.

    An informal entertainment and dance given by "Ctenarske Besedy" (The Literary Club) last Saturday turned out as we expected exceedingly well, excelling in all respects previous entertainments of the Club. ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 d, II B 1 c 3
  • Svornost -- October 08, 1878
    [Vlasta Women's Society Organized]

    It is true, that Chicago Bohemians had once before a Women's Society under the name "Libuse" but this did not prove enduring as , after the great fire of 1871, they did not meet again. For eight years our Bohemian Society was without the noble influence of a Women's Organization. Today, we are able to warmly welcome again the first such organization which incidently takes the name "Vlasta".

    Upon the invitation of some of our more enlightened ladies a meeting was held the 6th of October in the"Tel. Jed. Sokol"(Gymnastic Society Sokol) Hall. After a lenghty debate as to what kind of lodge would be organized and what its aims are to be, it was unanimously agreed to name it "Vlasta" and that it should be educational and social. Some debate was also carried on about the subject of benefits but this did not meet with approval.

    When organization was perfected 57 ladies present came forward and accepted active membership by paying an initiatory fee of fifty cents. Thereafter monthly 2dues were set at .15¢ so that they would not be burdensome to anyone.

    "Vlasta" will hold their educational meetings separately from their social gatherings. The members will do considerable reading and the society will find a great help in the library, which is made up of books belonging to Tel. Jed. Sokol(Gymnastic Society Sokol) Besedy(Literary Club) and Svobodne Obce (Republic.) The books will be loaned without charge.

    We know there are among the membership several wise and experienced ladies who know how to handle these difficult beginnings with a firm hand, and when some of the new members become accustomed to Parliamentary Prodecure, it will be a pleasure to listen to their debates.

    It is true, that Chicago Bohemians had once before a Women's Society under the name "Libuse" but this did not prove enduring as , after the great fire of 1871, ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 d, II B 2 a
  • Jewish Advance -- November 22, 1878
    (No headline)

    Chicago Sketches. by Ben Adam. Y. M. H. A.

    About two years ago, a very warm and enthusiastic agitation for literary societies commenced to stir up the young men of the North Side, and they at once organized a society under the name of Y. M. H. A. The success and prosperity which they enjoyed in the first days of their existence, prompted some young people of the West Side to do likewise, and the Zion Lit. "became an established fact," and a short time afterward the Sinai and Progress, on the South Side, were organized, and they were followed by the members of the Standard Club, who instituted at their establishment the "alma mater of fashion, an extraordinary chair of literature and debate, and called the same "Literary Society."

    For about a year these Literaries were all the rage with the young folks, they became absorbing topics of the day, but, alas, this did not last very 2long. The warm feelings for elevation and cultivation of the mind relaxed, subsided, and at last passed away like a cloud. The Y. M. H. A. was the first to give up its ghost, and on last Wednesday the Sinai Lit. followed them into the quiet waters of the Lethe.

    At present we have here only three Literary Societies, the Zion on the West and the Standard and Progress on the South Side, and according to my judgement, the Zion alone stands today developed as an organization in full strength of a promising and useful existence.

    Chicago Sketches. by Ben Adam. Y. M. H. A. About two years ago, a very warm and enthusiastic agitation for literary societies commenced to stir up the young men of ...

    Jewish
    II B 1 d, II D 6
  • Svornost -- December 09, 1878
    Z Ctenarke Besedy ( from the Literary Club).

    In the last meeting which was held Saturday evening it was agreed that hereafter, we are to have lectures on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Also it was decided that any member wishing to speak should communicate with the agent of the Club so that he may publish the necessary information to members.

    Thus far the following have agreed to speak:- F. B. Zdrubek, V. Kotzum, Fr. Stetka and A. Purer. The first lecture will be held to-morriw night and Mr. F. B. Zdrubek will be the speaker.

    Fr. Stetkam Agent.

    In the last meeting which was held Saturday evening it was agreed that hereafter, we are to have lectures on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Also it was decided that any member ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 d, IV, II B 2 g
  • Svornost -- June 24, 1880
    "C.S.P.S." Convention. 3rd Day

    There was nothing much that would be of interest to the general public in yesterday's session of the C.S.P.S. convention.

    Shortly after one o'clock the delegates attended the funeral of Bro. Jos. Vutika, of #208 West 19th Street, and in the evening for the most part, they attended a theatrical performance, given in the honor of them, by the (Reading Club) "Ctenarsky Spolek".

    There was nothing much that would be of interest to the general public in yesterday's session of the C.S.P.S. convention. Shortly after one o'clock the delegates attended the funeral of ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, II B 1 d, II B 1 c 1
  • The Occident -- November 19, 1880
    (No headline)

    On acquiring possession it was dedicated toits new purposes as a Jewish Temple, in September ( onthe eve of Rosh Hashana ) 1864.

    Five years later, the congregation finding that the location was not a suitable one, disposed of this property and purchases a lot on thecorner of Jackson and Sangamon Street upon which they erected the Temple in which the congregation now assemble. But now the temple which has done duty for eleven years proves too small for holidays and some other occasions, and it is proposed to either buy or build a new temple. Certain it is, in such an event, the congregation would enter into a new period of prosperity and usefulness and would become a still richer source of blessing to hundreds of co-religionists residing on the West Side.

    The congregation maintains also a flourishing Sabbath school, of which Dr. Felsenthal is Superintendent. The present staff of teachers consist of the following ladies and gentlemen:- Mrs. Leah Strauss, Miss Leonora Strauss, Miss Carrie Homan, Mr. H. Eliassof, Mr. Ira Rubel and Mr. Moses Greenbaum.

    There are about one hundred and fifty children in attendance.

    3

    The Zion Literary Society, the most popular and prosperous one of its kind in this city, was founded several years ago by the enthusiasm and zeal of some members of the congregation, and there has always been a mutual attachment between the congregation and the society.

    As another branch of thecongregation the "Israelittische Frauen Verin" and the "West Side Sewing Society" must bw mentioned....About two years ago Zion Congregation joined the U. of A. H. C., Anshey Mayriv having previously connected itself withthis Union. But it is time that other congregations should follow their example. In a few months the Union will hold its biennial council in our city, and what a deplorable circumstance will it be if the large Jewdom of Chicago is represented by only two of its many congregations at that time.

    On acquiring possession it was dedicated toits new purposes as a Jewish Temple, in September ( onthe eve of Rosh Hashana ) 1864. Five years later, the congregation finding that ...

    Jewish
    III C, II B 1 d