The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 14, 1861
    Semiannual Meeting of the German Society of Chicago

    Yesterday the German society of Chicago held its semiannual meeting. Only a few members attended.

    Since there is so little money in the treasury, it was proposed that a ball or a fair be held. The members decided on a ball, and authorized the executive board to make arrangements for a future fair or concert.

    Mr. Charles Verghoe was elected treasurer by acclamation.

    Upon recommendation of the agent of the Society his semiannual report was read; it was adopted, and the members voted to publish it. Adjournment followed.

    Yesterday the German society of Chicago held its semiannual meeting. Only a few members attended. Since there is so little money in the treasury, it was proposed that a ball ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 23, 1862
    Report on Annual Ball of the German Society of Chicago

    Receipts

    Sale of tickets $214.00
    Lottery tickets 37.75
    Refreshments 111.40
    Donations 1.50
    Total $364.65

    Disbursements

    Music $ 25.00
    Hall 8.00
    Printing 6.50
    Miscellaneous 2.00
    2
    Counterfeit $ 3.00
    Total 44.50
    Net Proceeds $319.85

    In the name of the needy who receive help from the German Society of Chicago I heartily thank all who participated in this ball. The work of the magnaminous, sympathetic ladies whose efforts made the ball a success is hereby gratefully acknowledged. Some of them were more successful than others in selling tickets, nevertheless all of them deserve honorable mention. I am particularly grateful to Miss Grommes who handled the sale of lottery tickets; also to Mr. Huck, Bush and Brand, Hiller, Fischer and Lehmann, Wilhelh Gottfried and Schoenhoefer, Bier-John, and Siebert for their generous donations of beer.

    As usual, the press gave us their splendid support.

    3

    Later we shall have more to say about the German Society of Chicago and its benevolent activity.

    Henry Greenbaum, President.

    Receipts <table> <tr> <td>Sale of tickets</td> <td>$214.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Lottery tickets</td> <td>37.75</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Refreshments</td> <td>111.40</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Donations</td> <td>1.50</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Total</td> <td>$364.65</td> </tr> </table> Disbursements <table> <tr> <td>Music</td> ...

    German
    III B 2, II A 2, II D 10, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 22, 1863
    The Northwest Fair for the Support of Sick and Wounded Union Soldiers An Appeal to the German Ladies of Chicago (Editorial)

    As everybody knows, the local Ladies' Aid For The Support of Sick and Wounded Union Soldiers, recently suggested that a great fair be held, and that the entire Northwest be invited to participate, the proceeds to be placed at the disposal of the Chicago Board of Health. The idea was generally received very favorably not only in Illinois but also in neighboring states, and the fair will undoubtedly be the greatest Chicago has ever seen. It will be opened on Tuesday, October 27, at Bryan's Hall, and will continue for two weeks.

    The net proceeds are to be devoted to the support of sick and wounded Union soldiers, without respect to race, creed, or national origin. So German 2ladies will certainly give the project their full support. American ladies have had more than one opportunity to convince themselves of the fine quality of the handiwork of German ladies, and the latter will now have occasion to show that they are not only very skillful but also very patriotic.

    Mrs. Hoge and Mrs. Livermore, who head the enterprise, have requested that we ask the German ladies who wish to lend their aid to this praiseworthy, humane undertaking to meet at three o'clock this afternoon at Bryan's Hall, for the purpose of discussing some matters pertinent to the fair. The German ladies of Chicago will undoubtedly appear and will organize a German department.

    As everybody knows, the local Ladies' Aid For The Support of Sick and Wounded Union Soldiers, recently suggested that a great fair be held, and that the entire Northwest be ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 26, 1863
    Northwest Fair Ladies of German Division Meet at German House

    The ladies of the German Division of the Northwest Fair met on Sunday, October 26, at the German House for the purpose of receiving gifts from German contributors. By three o'clock in the afternoon, four hundred and sixty donations had arrived and the ladies had all they could do to estimate their value and to number them.

    Anyone wishing to get an idea of the accomplishments of German industry and perseverance in the cause of the Union, specifically in behalf of our sick and wounded soldiers, need only view the many crocheted, knitted, and embroidered articles which our diligent ladies have made for the Fair.

    It is impossible to describe all the things that have been delivered at the German House; however, we shall mention some that are especially attractive.

    2

    We saw a sofa that was plaited of the finest straw and which will grace any parlor. On one table there were the finest silver spoons, forks, knives, and napkin-rings, and even gold penholders with silver handles--all of them the handiwork of our German ladies. In the embroidery department especially, there are many very fine articles: pillowcases, coverings for chairs, seats, beds, tables, sofas, etc; all in a harmonious variety of colors. There is also much excellent network, and many good knitted articles, such as shawls, mufflers, ladies' and men's caps.

    We could continue telling about other interesting and useful articles that we saw, but we are convinced that our readers will profit more by going to the German House and seeing them. And, lest they forget, these things must be sold, if our soldiers are to be cared for.

    On our "sight-seeing tour" we noted particularly, that men were conspicuous by their absence. The ladies were doing all the work--even decorating the 3room in which the articles are to be displayed. They ought to avenge themselves by making many sales to the men. We hope that the latter will come with well-filled pocketbooks.

    The ladies of the German Division of the Northwest Fair met on Sunday, October 26, at the German House for the purpose of receiving gifts from German contributors. By three ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 10, 1863
    Final Report on Proceeds of the Northwest Fair

    Receipts in Bryan Hall $ 9,737.58
    Receipts in Restaurant 6,446.67
    Receipts in Supervisor's Office 2,121.54
    Receipts in Metropolitan Hall 5,000.00
    Receipts from sales 30,000.00
    Receipts in from German Division 3,500.00
    Cash donations 12,000.00
    Received in Art Gallery 3,000.00
    Total $71,805.79
    Disbursements $ 6,000.00
    Net profit $65,805.79

    <table> <tr> <td>Receipts in Bryan Hall</td> <td>$ 9,737.58</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Receipts in Restaurant</td> <td>6,446.67</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Receipts in Supervisor's Office</td> <td>2,121.54</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Receipts in Metropolitan Hall</td> <td>5,000.00</td> </tr> <tr> ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 13, 1863
    Northwest Fair Official Report of the German Division

    The proceeds of the German Division of the Northwest Fair for the support of sick and wounded Union soldiers were as follows:

    Received through the sale of donations from Wisconsin $1,464.95
    Received through sale of goods donated by Chicago Germans 2,335.00
    Total $3,799.95

    The above sum was delivered to the Northwestern Branch of the United States Sanitary Commission.

    Chicago, Illinois, November 11, 1863. Mrs. Elsie Schneider.
    Mrs. Elsie Solomon.

    The proceeds of the German Division of the Northwest Fair for the support of sick and wounded Union soldiers were as follows: <table> <tr> <td>Received through the sale of donations ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 19, 1867
    Ladies' Auxiliary of Aid Society for German Immigrants to Give a Popular Fair

    After Mrs. Johann Metzke had opened the meeting, Mrs. Rosa Nemett was elected secretary of the arrangements committee, to take the place of Mrs. Rosalie Nelke who could not be present. The Eisendrath Company was appointed to the committee, to represent the grocers, since Mr. H. Schoellkopf could not serve.

    It was decided that the young ladies who wish to take part in the dances and tableau will meet Wednesday, September 25, at eight P. M., in Uhlich's Hall, to rehearse under the supervision of Mr. Marwedel. Receipt of the following donations was acknowledged:

    Matthiessen and Hegler $25.00
    Chicago Helvetiaverein 20.00
    Miss Mary Fliegler 4.75
    2
    Miss Buetter $10.00
    Miss L. Rullmann 5.15
    Miss Schloetzer 10.00

    The secretary announced that both the Germania Maennerchor and the Concordia Maennerchor have declared themselves willing to give concerts on several evenings during the fair.

    It was decided to have the next meeting on Friday, September 27, at 3 P. M. at Uhlich's Hall.

    Jno. Metzke, President

    Rosalie Nelke, Secretary.

    After Mrs. Johann Metzke had opened the meeting, Mrs. Rosa Nemett was elected secretary of the arrangements committee, to take the place of Mrs. Rosalie Nelke who could not be ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 02, 1867
    Final Report of Fair Committee

    The undersigned Fair committee of the Chicago Turngemeinde herewith respectfully submits the final report of its treasurer. We heartily thank all donors of gifts, the Ladies Auxiliary for its tireless efforts, and all persons who contributed to the success of the Fair. The Chicago Turngemeinde is exceedingly proud of the benevolent spirit which the German citizens of Chicago displayed on this occasion, and this organization will continue to show its appreciation.

    Very respectfully

    The Fair Committee.

    Final Report

    Collected by Ladies Auxiliary................. $1,189.10

    Proceeds from sale............................. 2,699.14

    2

    Proceeds from sale of pistols....................... 325.50

    Paid admissions....................................... 974.60

    Proceeds from sale of meals........................ 958.88

    Total receipts......................................... $6,147.22

    Total disbursements ................................. 2,144.88

    Net profit ............................................. $4,002.34

    Albert Boese, Treasurer.

    The undersigned Fair committee of the Chicago Turngemeinde herewith respectfully submits the final report of its treasurer. We heartily thank all donors of gifts, the Ladies Auxiliary for its tireless ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 18, 1867
    The Soldiers' Fair

    The executive board of the Soldiers' Fair Association held a meeting yesterday at Crosby's Concert Hall. General Wallace reported that the proceeds from the picnic at Haase's Park amounted to $1,050. The Chicago & North Western Railroad Company furnished transportation at half price, for which they received a vote of thanks. More than one thousand tickets (sic) are still unaccounted for.

    Mr. Hesing, Mr. Bonney, General Mann, and Mr. Hawley were delegated to procure the use of Crosby's Opera House, gratis. Mr. Vaas was appointed to serve on the music committee in place of Mr. H. Balatka. Mr. Charles Lockey was appointed to membership on the art committee. Mr. Scates collected $280 from shipowners. W. K. Lee reported that the members of the Trade Assembly promised to contribute clothing, money, etc.

    Mr. Muehlke reported that the Lutheran congregations would promote the interests 2of the Fair as much as possible.

    The Independent Order of Oddfellows will give a banquet on November 7, at the Opera House, for the benefit of the Fair. Mr. Colbert was appointed to serve as chairman of the publications committee in place of General Smith. Judge Yates donated a was bouquet encased in glass. This ornament is to be awarded to the lady who receives the greatest number of votes (sic). The Board adjourned until next Thursday afternoon.

    The executive board of the Soldiers' Fair Association held a meeting yesterday at Crosby's Concert Hall. General Wallace reported that the proceeds from the picnic at Haase's Park amounted to ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, III D, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 22, 1867
    The Popular Fair Opening Address by Dr. Fessel

    The Popular Fair for the benefit of German immigrants was opened last night at Ulrich's Hall. It was well attended and the visitors evidently took great interest in this worthy undertaking. Both rooms of the Hall in which the Fair is being held have been appropriately and beautifully decorated. The walls of the north room of the hall which contains the sales booths are adorned with pretty garlands; in the center of the room there is a magnificent pyramid of flowers, and on the speakers' platform there is a very good portrait of Count Bismarck, painted by our artist, Mr. Highwood. The south room is arranged for-concerts, and also serves as a barroom. In the center of this room there is a temple made of flowers, where the Goddess of Liberty (in miniature) holds sway. The walls of this hall have also been decorated with wreaths, and at the end of the room, visible to all who enter, is a banner inscribed "In Unity There is Strength".

    2

    Dr. Fessel, director of the Aid Society for German Immigrants opened the Fair. In his address he said that the large Chicago German attendance at this Fair is commendable. He thanked all visitors, the Concordia Maennerchor, and the Germania Maennerchor. He expressed his gratitude to all the ladies for their interest and participation in this benevolent enterprise. He also expressed gratitude to Mr. Knobelsdorff, who conceived the idea of holding the Fair, for his tireless efforts to make the affair a success. Thereupon Mr. E. Juessen delivered the principal address as follows:

    "It is a noble, exalted purpose that brings us together here today. In no other way could we achieve greater honor than by aiding poor lonely German immigrants. We support the picnics given by turners and choruses and we attend their concerts and entertainments, because these men serve to prevent puritanism and temperance from gaining control of our political parties.

    "However, we are not assembled for political purposes this evening. Moreover, 3we are actuated by sympathy, deep and sincere sympathy, toward poor German immigrants who are being cheated by land pirates and confidence men in America, and whose German uprightness is no match for Yankee 'smartness'. This Society was established to protect German immigrants in this allegedly Christian country where they are not supposed to enjoy themselves on Sunday, although they are forced to toil like slaves on the other six days of the week.

    "In conclusion I wish to thank the German ladies and girls for the great sacrifices which they have made in the interest of this Fair. When the wounded returned from the fields of battle, it was the German ladies and girls who cared for the brave soldiers, and when our immigrants were in need of assistance, these good Samaritans again exerted their magic and influence by persuading German men to donate liberally, and the fruit of their labor is before our eyes."

    The Concordia Maennerchor then delighted the audience with well-rendered vocal selections, the most enjoyable of which were: "Saengergruss," "A Prayer At Sea," and "March Serenade". Mrs. Auguste Herrenkind sang an aria from "Freischuetz," 4and her melodious, well-trained voice enchanted the audience. We look forward to great things from her. The duet from "Don Pasquale" rendered by Bischof and J. Nielsen, was greatly appreciated and won much applause.

    A great variety of valuable articles is on display in both rooms of the hall, and the ladies and girls are showing great zeal and ability in disposing of them at a good profit.

    At the entrance of the north room there is a very good piano, donated by Kraushaar and Company. The instrument is to be raffled off. To the right of the entrance there is a well-arranged display of excellent furniture. Mrs. Johanna Lindemann is the supervisor of this department, and she is assisted by the following salesladies: Miss Caroline Schmitz, Miss Julie Gloeckner, Miss Goothe, Miss Marie Wischendorf, and Miss Sophie Kiessling.

    Mrs. J. Metzke, chairman of the Fair, and Mrs. Rosalie Nelke, secretary, and 5Mr. Max Koerner, auctioneer, have their office in the northwest corner. Next to it is the candy department which is supervised by Mrs. Sophie Koerner. Adjoining the candy department is the booth in which ladies' handiwork is shown. Mrs. L. Knobelsdorff, Mrs. Auguste Ahrens, and Miss Marie Woeliffer are the supervisors, while Miss Margaretha Schoetzer and Miss Lena Nemett are the salesladies.

    Proceeding west we come to the well-arranged display of gold and silverware which is under the supervision of Miss Betty Faber. Next to it is the porcelain department where Mrs. Marie Mueller presides, and in the adjacent booth Mrs. Auguste Schmidt is engaged in selling fine perfumes.

    Continuing our journey we find Mrs. Bella Achert selling cigars, Miss Emma Rietz selling ironware, and Mrs. Minna Meininger and Miss Mattel selling shoes.

    The postal division is conducted by Mrs. A. Specht assisted by Miss Anna Achert, Miss Anna Kirchner, Miss Therese Scheider, Miss Lina Mehrle, Miss Louisa Nass, 6and Miss Ulrike Roman. This department apparently does a good business, for very few people leave the room without purchasing a letter.

    To the left of the entrance Miss Helene Mueller is accepting votes for the ladies' popularity contest. Mrs. De La Heye, Mrs. Emma Grotz, Mrs. Emma Schade, Mrs. Lina Niethmann, Mrs. Louise Jacoby, and Mrs. Marie Fluegler are selling tickets for raffles.

    The culinary department, where excellent food and beverages may be had at little cost, is supervised by Mrs. Friedericke Rietz who is ably assisted by Mrs. Carolina Ludwig, Mrs. Auguste Rietz, Mrs. Carl Schmidt, Mrs. Hepp, Miss Lena Rietz, and Miss Krause.

    The entire Fair is well arranged, testifying to the skill of Mr. Charles Rietz, the treasurer of the Society. We expect that our German residents, who are well known for their benevolent spirit, will give this undertaking the support which it justly merits.

    The Popular Fair for the benefit of German immigrants was opened last night at Ulrich's Hall. It was well attended and the visitors evidently took great interest in this worthy ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, III G, II D 10, III B 2