The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Hejmdal -- January 23, 1875
    (No headline)

    We ask the Danes in Chicago to help financially towards the monument of H. C. Andersen, which is going to be erected, in Copenhagen. Every nation is helping, so we are sure that Danes in America will, too.

    Receipt will be given for the donations. A. Skow. Petersen.

    We ask the Danes in Chicago to help financially towards the monument of H. C. Andersen, which is going to be erected, in Copenhagen. Every nation is helping, so we ...

    Danish
    II B 1 b
  • Hejmdal -- January 23, 1875
    (No headline)

    We ask the Danes in Chicago to help financially towards the monument of H. C. Andersen, which is going to be erected, in Copenhagen. Every nation is helping, so we are sure that Danes in America will, too.

    Receipt will be given for the donations. A. Skow. Petersen.

    We ask the Danes in Chicago to help financially towards the monument of H. C. Andersen, which is going to be erected, in Copenhagen. Every nation is helping, so we ...

    Danish
    II B 1 b
  • Svornost -- June 03, 1878
    [Reading Club Commemorates the Death of Voltaire]

    The Reading Club commemorated the one hundredth Anniversary of the death of Voltaire, exhibiting a large portrait of him and reading several of his shorter works. Because of rain, attendance was small.

    We were much surprised at the skill of our young and modest artist, Miss M. Koupalove.

    Using a small portrait as a model, she completed, in two hours, a large painting for the club. She is certainly deserving of recognition and encourgement to proceed to further success.

    The Reading Club commemorated the one hundredth Anniversary of the death of Voltaire, exhibiting a large portrait of him and reading several of his shorter works. Because of rain, attendance ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 d, IV, II B 1 e, II B 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 26, 1891
    Anderson Monument

    The Danish population appointed a committee several weeks ago for the purpose of planning and preparing the erection of a monument for the Danish poet and writer, Hans Christian Anderson. This committee assembled last night at 345 Milwaukee Ave. to proceed with their task. They elected among themselves the following officials: President A. Peterson, a member of the banking establishment, Petersen & Bay: Vice-President, Johannes Gelert; Secretary, C.M.Kodt; Treasurer, C.H.Hansen.

    It was decided not to take up any subscriptions until the society had secured the papers of incorporation. The name of the society is: Hans Christian Anderson Monument Association.

    The Danish population appointed a committee several weeks ago for the purpose of planning and preparing the erection of a monument for the Danish poet and writer, Hans Christian Anderson. ...

    Danish
    II B 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 19, 1892
    Dedication of the Schiller Theater.

    Without song and fanfare the building of the German Schiller Theater continued uninterruptedly. The founding festivities, incidental to the laying of the cornerstone were dispensed with by the directorate and for a good reason - they wished to assure themselves of its realization before indulging in the customary celebrations. The main problem of their goal will soon be past history, since the Schiller Theater will stand completed within the next 10 days. Thursday evening, Sep. 29, will be the first celebration of the founders and promoters who have given Chicago this imposing monument of German energy and German enterprise. True friends of Germanism and German art will rejoice in this accomplishment, even if they are notable to attend in person.

    The completion of this theater opens new channels for us and relieves us of difficulties we endured heretofore. Even until last spring, the German Theater management had to beg the English theaters to condescend and to grant to them, so that German performances could be given on Sundays and ... they paid high rentals for the privilege. Performances which required special scenery could not be given, since such equipment was not available and to transport it from the Milwaukee stage was also impossible, because of the time element, only a half day being available. And many German plays could not be produced, because 2no theater was available.

    After Oct. 1st we will have a permanent remedy. German art will then have a stage of its own where it may flower to perfection. Not only will German art flourish but its enthusiastic friends .... will be able to exclaim: "This house is also a home, built for you, that you may be comfortable therein. No speculative mania but German enterprise prompted this work and gave it a solid financial foundation, healthy and secure, which precludes any apprehensions.... Here you may satisfy your longing for German art, for edigication or education, after the day's arduous labors permit a resting period.

    It is destined to be a family theater in the true sense of the word.

    On Thursday evening the stockholders will have the first opportunity to enjoy the successful work .... on Saturday will be the public opening.... The directorate regrets that it cannot extend an invitation to all its German friends... and supporters to the dedication.... The theater holds only 1,300 persons...

    The program at the dedication ceremony lists the following selections and 3speeches:

    1.) Jubilee Overture by Carl Maria Von Weber.
    John Hand's Orchestra.
    2.) Prolog E. F. L. Gaus.
    3.) Benediction by Herman Mohr
    Orpheus Male Chorus.
    4.) Address by the President.. Mr. A. C. Hesing.
    5.) Festival Overture Lentner
    John Hand's Orchestra.
    6.) Speech by Hempstead Washburne, Mayor of Chicago.
    7.) "Song-poem to the artists". Lyric by F. Schiller,
    Composed by Mendelsohn Bartholdy
    Orpheus Male Chorus.
    4

    8.) Speech by Emil Hirsch.

    9.) Pantomine, the work of F. Welb, Theater Manager.

    Without song and fanfare the building of the German Schiller Theater continued uninterruptedly. The founding festivities, incidental to the laying of the cornerstone were dispensed with by the directorate and ...

    German
    II B 1 a, III A, I C, II B 1 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 11, 1895
    St. Casimir Young Men's Society Stages Special Anniversary Program

    A special anniversary program was staged by the St. Casimir Young Men's Society of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock in the parish school hall. This program was given to terminate a year of work in the benevolent and patriotic field. The hall was filled to capacity by the Polish youth of the parish.

    A picture of the patron saint, consecrated yesterday during special services apropos of the occasion at St. Stanislaus Kostka Church, was on display during the affair. The portrait was painted by the well-known Polish artist, Thaddeus Zukotynski.

    The program was officially opened by John Nering, president of the St. Casimir Young Men's Society, who called upon Reverend Eugene Sedlaczek, chaplain of the 2Society, to act as chairman; Vincent Jozwiakowski was appointed recording secretary.

    The program, rich in variety, was as follows:

    St. Cecilia Men's Choir opened the program with the song "Trzysta Lat Przeszlo" (Three Hundred Years Have Passed). Then the choir sang "Z Ojczyzny Mej Wagnany" (Exiled from My Fatherland) and "Serce Lasze" (Polish Heart). The audience received these national songs with unstinted applause. Credit should be given to Andrew Kwasigroch for his fine direction. J. Kondziorski sang a beautiful Polish solo which captivated the audience.

    Declamations were executed with great feeling by A. Klafta, A. Frank, J. Anderszat, and Julian Szczepanski.

    The program was given added color by the amateur mandolin orchestra, composed of members of the local post office. This group offered their services free of charge; they were invited by F. Kwasigroch, superintendent of the Milwaukee Avenue Post Office.

    3

    Henry Nagiel, who spoke on "Youth--That Is Our Future," was the initial speaker of the program. He pointed out the importance of Polish youth and described the duties it is to perform. He urged it to elevate, enlighten and moralize itself; to make a sincere effort toward truth, good and justice; to protect its ideals; and to follow the road that leads toward the culmination of Christian morals and truth. Mr. Nagiel especially urged the Polish-American youth to retain its Polish culture, to be fond of work for the Polish cause, and to maintain the high standards and ideals which were handed down to us by our fathers.

    Reverend Vincent Barzynski, pastor of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish, who was a part of the audience, was requested to make a speech. He directed his words, warm and sincere, toward the Polish youth in the hall. He told this youth that its primary aim is to safeguard its virtue and religion, and through faith to find various means of work for the Polish cause. The pastor pointed out St. Casimir as a model after which Polish youth should always pattern itself, 4if it wishes to be respected by God and its fellowmen.

    The next guest to take the speaker's stand, by invitation, was Peter Kiolbassa, who expressed sincere wishes for the continuation of the good work and growth of the St. Casimir Young Men's Society. He urged the youth to live honorably, and to remember religious, family and citizenship duties, as well as national ones. Mr. Kiolbassa stated that the present day Polish youth is fortunate as compared to the youth of the times of the early Polish settlers; for they have schools, churches, libraries, and societies at their disposal. He urged it to take advantage of all these opportunities.

    All the speakers were received with enthusiastic applause.

    The occasion was closed by Reverend Sedlaczek, chaplain of the Society, after which the Polish national hymn "Boze Cos Polske" (God Save Poland) was sung by the Polish youth.

    5

    A word must be said about the beautiful painting of the patron saint of the Society, created by Mr. Zukotynski. It is indeed such a fine piece of art work--one that our Poles of Chicago can take pride in. The portrait is a true representation of St. Casimir; angels with emblems of the faith fill the background. In the corner of the picture is found the coat of arms of Poland and Lithuania. The coloring is unusually beautiful and realistic. Its worth is recognized not only by lovers of art, but also by the average person.

    A special anniversary program was staged by the St. Casimir Young Men's Society of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock in the parish school hall. This program ...

    Polish
    III E, IV, III C, II B 1 b, II B 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 10, 1895
    St. Hyacinth Church Consecrated

    Consecration services of St. Hyacinth Church took place yesterday before a large crowd of parishioners. Four other Polish parishes were also represented, namely, St. Stanislaus Kostka, St. John Cantius, St. Hedwig, and St. Stanislaus Bishop and Martyr.

    An impressive number of Polish societies were present. There was band music, and the Polish Cavalry and military groups headed the parade.

    The consecration ceremonies were celebrated by Archbishop Feehan and Reverend John Kasprzycki, pastor of St. John Cantius Parish; both were assisted by Reverends Adolph Nowicki, L. Machdzicki, and John Piechowski, pastor of St. Hyacinth Parish.

    Mass was celebrated by Reverend Kasprzycki. During the divine services the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish Choir, accompanied by the Nowicki Brother's Orchestra, sang the "Mass" by Lambellota. The choir was masterfully directed by Andrew 2Kwasigroch. Members of the Polish Cavalry sat in the first row during the services.

    The Reverend A. Nowicki, pastor of St. Michael Parish, delivered the sermon. He also read a letter from the archbishop relative to the schism at St. Hedwig Parish. After reading this he explained the causes of the rift.

    Although St. Hyacinth Church is simple, it is pleasing to the eye. The church proper is on the first floor; the parish school is located below. Beside the church, the rectory is nearing completion.

    The establishment of this parish is satisfactory and there are indications that a bright future lies ahead.

    In conclusion it must be added that a portrait of the patron saint of the parish, painted by Thaddeus Zukotynski, local artist, was placed at the head of the altar. The painting is indeed a work of art.

    Consecration services of St. Hyacinth Church took place yesterday before a large crowd of parishioners. Four other Polish parishes were also represented, namely, St. Stanislaus Kostka, St. John Cantius, St. ...

    Polish
    III C, IV, III B 2, II B 1 b, II B 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 14, 1895
    Examinations Completed at St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish School

    As has been previously announced, examinations are over at the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish School. Their results were favorable, to say the least. We were well informed about this but were not inclined to mention it in the paper because we did not wish to be called biased, nor did we wish to praise the school too much, since the principal,Reverend Vincent Barzynski, is also the manager of Dziennik Chicagoski.

    We are of the opinion that the present article will not be considered biased, since it has been taken from the columns of another Polish paper. This article, reprinted from Gazeta Katolicka (Catholic Gazette), reads as follows:

    "The St. Stanislaus Kostka Parochial School is undoubtedly the largest in the United States. At the present time three thousand children attend its classes. Five trained teachers and thirty-four Sisters of Notre Dame are in charge.

    2

    Last Thursday and Friday, June 6 and 7, classes were placed in the hands of the members of the Board of Education, who supervised the annual examinations. It is unfortunate that not one of those who are opposed to parochial schools was present. He would have been surprised to note just how far our boys and girls have risen in the various fields of learning.

    Thursday morning the pupils of Mr. Domka were examined, and in the afternoon those of I. Kowalski; Friday morning Szczesny Zahajkiewicz's class was inspected and in the afternoon that of B. Klarkowski. The children gave answers with ease to the questions put to them. It has been said that children are inclined to memorize what they learn and repeat the same automatically. During this examination no such replies were given, for upon further questioning the children definitely convinced the examiners that they knew their subjects thoroughly.

    The first examination was in catechism and the replies to queries were quick and to the point. Tests in Polish history revealed that the children were well 3versed in this field. Some children gave recitations, and then the entire class sang Polish national songs, including religious numbers. Szczesny Zahajkiewicz, who conducts the history and singing classes, was well pleased with the results.

    Arithmetics and geography are taught by Mr. Klarkowski. The most difficult problems in the former branch of study were solved with ease. All students have shown throughout the year that they have a natural aptitude for arithmetic.

    Drawing lessons are given by Ignace Kowalski. It must be conceded that the students in this class fare well. The most promising students in the drawing class are John Marach, Stanislaus Krepec, Thomas Nalepinski and W. Gorecki. The following excel in color work: P. Katki, who is the best, and J. Blank. Although the latter draws with his left hand, his right being stiff, his work is excellent.

    English grammar is placed in the capable hands of Mr. Kellet. It cannot be said that this class is neglected.

    4

    In a few words, the boys at the Stanislaus Kostka Parish School, with the training they receive, will be able to help themselves in their later years. Through their obedience to the teachers and the fulfillment of their lessons they can be not only a credit to themselves but also to Poland. Their advanced education, of course, depends largely upon the interest of their parents. That is why the parents are warned to keep a careful eye upon their children after they leave school.

    The children highest in deportment in each class received rewards of books. W. Gorecki received the first reward.

    It would be superfluous to add more about this fine school. This school represents the best there is in parochial schools.

    As has been previously announced, examinations are over at the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish School. Their results were favorable, to say the least. We were well informed about this but ...

    Polish
    I A 2 a, IV, III C, II B 1 b, II B 1 a
  • Abendpost -- July 11, 1895
    [Kinsley's German Restaurant]

    In the presence of many guests and friends, the new "Deutsches Restaurant" under Kinsley's management was opened last night. The really elegant dining rooms show in architecture and decoration particular German characteristics.

    Even the oldtime German proverbs on the walls are not missing. The wooden cross-beam ceiling, the heavy-set bar with carved coats of arms and big colorful earthenware steins remind you of the old-time Beer-Halls. The business manager of this remarkable establishment is Mr. Ernest Kitz, assisted by Mr. Henry Menke.

    In the presence of many guests and friends, the new "Deutsches Restaurant" under Kinsley's management was opened last night. The really elegant dining rooms show in architecture and decoration particular ...

    German
    II A 2, II B 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 12, 1900
    Edward Ruehlow

    A highly talented artist, died yesterday at his home here. He was born September 29th,1830 at Naugard in Pommern. He became a lithographer, and immigrated to America in 1866 coming directly to Chicago which he called his second home. Hardly any time elapsed before he established one of the largest lithographic firms of its type in the West under the name of Ruehlow and Essroger. The great Chicago fire left him almost penniless but his spirit rose again and in a comparatively short time he rebuilt his business on a much larger scale, from which he retired ten years ago to devote his time to his favored occupation, painting. Among his collection of paintings there are several of Lincoln Park. One of his works is of more than usual interest, for it represents the christening of the present German Kaiser, in which Bismarck and Moltke are also visible. The copy of this painting, made by the artist himself, was brought to Chicago, but was destroyed during the great conflagration. The original is in the possession of the royal family.

    A highly talented artist, died yesterday at his home here. He was born September 29th,1830 at Naugard in Pommern. He became a lithographer, and immigrated to America in 1866 coming ...

    German
    II A 3 b, II A 2, II B 1 b