The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 26, 1862
    Quarterly Report of the President of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein (Published at the request of the Verein)

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has received a copy. As far as we can judge at this time, the Verein will do well under it. The finances of the Verein are in good condition. The library of the Verein has been enlarged considerably, and the members have contributed their share to charity. It is hardly necessary to remind the members that the Verein is obligated to participate in every good work. Thus far, the organization has a good record in this respect.

    The following contributions were made for benevolent purposes during the past six months:

    2

    For Hecker's Regiment.....................$ 50.00

    For the wives of Union soldiers.......... 205.00

    For sick and wounded soldiers............ 50.00

    Total.........................................$305.00

    I thank the members and friends of the Verein who have assisted in obtaining these contributions.

    Disbursements for Library

    For periodicals:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...........$ 35.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862................... 37.00

    Total.....................................................$ 72.00

    3

    For books and binding:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...$135.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862............. 88.00

    Total.............................................$223.00

    If the library of a society may be considered a barometer of the educational standing of the members, we can view our shelves and cases with great satisfaction, since we have purchased the works of Dickens, Sir Walter Scott, Feuerbach, Hacklaender, Freiligrath, Cooper, Auerbach, Spindler, etc. The report of the librarian shows that our members are making good use of this source of education.

    The English night school which our Verein maintains for the benefit of the members has been in session regularly throughout the winter, which shows that our members also appreciate this opportunity to acquire knowledge. And the attendance would certainly have been much larger if the school were more 4centrally located, and if many had not been prevented by business, work, etc. from attending the school.

    The Verein also provided for the choral section. The entertainment given for the benefit of our singers netted $47.72, and this sum was turned over to the treasurer with the express understanding that he use the money to purchase music, etc.

    Fortunately, there were not many cases of sickness among the members; we seldom had more than three cases at a time, and there were no deaths.

    Our affiliation with the Peoria Arbeiter-Verein, should it materialize, will be the first step in our endeavor to spread the principles laid down in our constitution. It is desirable that our members who make their homes in other cities try to organize an Arbeiterverein there, using our constitution as a model, so that eventually anyone who leaves Chicago and settles in some other city will find an affiliated society in which he may become a member, and thus continue to 5receive the benefits which he now enjoys as a member of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein.

    Our Sunday evening entertainments have always been very well attended. It would be a great advantage to the members if the committee on lectures could provide for a lecture every two weeks. Besides stimulating the mind and increasing the knowledge of ambitious members and their friends, such lectures would, in my opinion, be the best means of getting rid of the class of people that thinks only of itself and its amusement and gives no thought to the responsibility which the Verein assumes when it arranges for this kind of entertainment. Let no one say that these people are afflicted with boredom only at certain lectures. The fact is that they are bored at every serious lecture. That was proved at the lecture on the death of Lovejoy, a martyr to the cause of liberty. Fortunately, there are only a few who place little value on education, and the sooner these people cease coming to our hall when serious topics are discussed, the better it will be for all concerned. And even if the subject matter is above the mental capacity of some of those who come to the meeting place of the Verein, they ought 6to have manners enough not to disturb those who want to listen, and should show enough respect for the lecturer to be quiet at least while he is speaking.....

    At the last meeting, the members elected a committee which has the duty of obtaining fuel at less than retail cost. I have a recommendation to make in regard to this matter. The Verein has some money in a bank. How about using it to buy fuel at wholesale for the benefit of members, and the treasury of the Verein? If each member should save only fifty cents by buying a ton of coal from the Verein, and the Verein should realize seventy-five cents on the transaction, the member would have a substantial saving, and, with coal at four dollars per ton, the Verein's money would have an earning capacity as follows:

    Net profit on investment $100 $18.75
    " " " " 400 75.00
    " " " " 533 100.00
    7

    That certainly is more than a bank pays, or can pay. And that is but three fifths of the entire profit, since the fifty cents saved by the purchaser must be considered also. Thus, if we would invest the whole of our bank balance ($533), the entire profit would be $100 for the Verein and $66.66 for the members. That would be a gain of 311/4 per cent, and the danger of loss would be eliminated because all transactions would be for cash only. I recommend that the Verein give this matter serious consideration.

    At the end of the last quarter the membership of the Verein was 389, a gain of 49.

    I have the great pleasure of informing you that a much friendlier spirit now prevails in our business meetings. When there is debating, it is done with less bitterness, and without sarcastic references to individuals. Thus the spirit of brotherhood is growing stronger, and as long as it asserts its power, the Verein will flourish.

    Theodor Hielscher,

    President of Chicago Arbeiter-Verein

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has ...

    German
    II D 1, I A 3, II D 10, II B 1 a, II B 2 g, II B 2 f, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 10, 1863
    The Chicago Arbeiterverein Third Quarterly Report of the President

    I take great pleasure in submitting my quarterly report; and I wish to congratulate the members upon the favorable standing of the society. Not only has the membership greatly increased and the fund for widows and orphans received sufficient contributions to put it on a sound basis, but also the state of health of the members, the progress made during the past months, and the general financial condition of our organization have been extremely gratifying.

    In regard to the financial report, I wish to call your attention to the fact that our financial condition ought to be of great interest to every member who has the welfare of the Arbeiterverein at heart; and each one must derive great satisfaction from the improved condition of our treasury. During my term of office it has been my constant object to observe the utmost 2economy in making expenditures.

    The funds of the society have been augmented, especially through payments to the treasury for widows and orphans, as may be seen from the report of the treasurer. Although under normal conditions we could have expected an increase in our net income, since we now have a larger number of members, our treasury balance is no greater than usual, because we were forced to assume greater obligations toward some of our members and also toward nonmembers. The greater part of our income was used to relieve the distress of widows, orphans, and dependents of soldiers. I take great pride in stating that the society has always shown a true spirit of benevolence, and has done much to make life more endurable for the poor and helpless. It has never permitted economy to restrict its charitable activity. And the general public has rendered valuable aid.

    During the past quarter the membership has risen to 935; 110 new members 3were added to our roll, and 33 were stricken from the membership list for nonpayment of dues. While this information gives us cause to rejoice, we should exercise greater care in the future when accepting members, since quite a few of those who were lately admitted to membership have not met their obligations, and joined merely for sake of the aid which our members receive.

    Financial Report

    Balance, February 23, 1863 $1,352.30
    Balance, May 22, 1863 2,391.12
    Quarterly receipts for dues, etc 1,810.65
    Special contributions 908.13
    Total $2,718.78
    Quarterly disbursements 1,679.96
    Balance $1,038.82
    4
    Sick benefits paid $219.00
    For support of dependents of soldiers 77.00
    For support of dependents of poor 42.00
    Funeral expenses 42.50
    For nurse 6.75
    Current expenses 1,288.71
    Total $1,675.96

    Widow and Orphan Fund

    Balance February 22, 1863 $151.00
    Payments up to March 31 824.00
    Monthly dues 288.59
    Contributions 77.00
    Total $1,340.59
    5
    Disbursements 28.25
    Balance $1,282.25 (sic)
    Deposited in bank 2,217.25
    In treasury 173.77
    Total $2,702.06 (sic)

    Recapitulation

    Total receipts $2,718.78
    Total disbursements 1,670.96
    Balance $1,037.82

    Widows and Orphans Fund

    6
    Receipts, February 22 to May 22 $1,301.50
    Disbursements 28.25
    Balance $1,273.25

    Since the available money of the society was used for charitable purposes, little could be done for our library, which was used by many to promote their education. We have 740 books, most of them on science. Though we have spent quite a bit of money to increase the efficiency of our library, there is still much room for improvement; for there is an ever greater demand for good instructive books. In the future we shall give this phase of our activity more attention.

    Our chorus is under the leadership of an able director and is making good progress. It has contributed much toward the success of our Sunday evening entertainments. However, it is desirable that more of our members participate 7in the activity of this branch of our organization--for their own benefit, and for the benefit of those who have not been endowed with "good" voices, but enjoy good vocal music.

    Concerning our school for instruction in English and free-hand drawing I wish to inform you that the society found it expedient to discontinue sessions during the summer; however this work will be resumed when cooler weather sets in, and will be under the supervision of an able instructor, thus affording every member an opportunity to acquire a knowledge of the English language--and every citizen of the United States should know English--and of the art of drawing. This latter branch was introduced for the benefit of those who desire to obtain technical knowledge. Unfortunately, past attendance was not very good. Let us take advantage of this facility, even though we may never expect to make regular use of what we learn about the art of technical drawing.

    8

    In my last report I recommended that the society erect a hall suitable for the purposes of the society, assuming that our fellow citizens will assist in this worthy enterprise. Our organization is growing rapidly because its activity has made it very popular, and that fact, too, should be considered when we face the problem of obtaining the money to pay for a building adequate to our needs. The Arbeiterverein is firmly convinced that the Germans of Chicago will not be found wanting in their contributions for this worthy cause, but will take great pride in assisting to erect a monument to German unity, industry, and charity.

    In conclusion, I wish to thank you for the confidence which you have shown during the past quarter, and for your generous and willing aid in the performance of my duties. Though it was impossible to please everybody, I assure you that it was my constant aim to promote the welfare of our society. I shall continue to keep this purpose in mind, and I hope that 9none of the members will be guided or controlled by petty jealousy or unjustified dissatisfaction, which might cause others to think ill of and belittle our organization.

    A. Braun, President.

    Chicago, May 27, 1863

    I take great pleasure in submitting my quarterly report; and I wish to congratulate the members upon the favorable standing of the society. Not only has the membership greatly increased ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 2 f, II B 1 a, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 24, 1866
    Germania Maennerchor

    Last Saturday evening, the Germania Maennerchor gave its first concert, which was well attended despite the extremely cold weather, which made transportation difficult. The chorus, which numbers forty members, rendered the various songs under the direction of its able conductor, Otto Lob, with precision and good taste, and the audience was very generous with its applause. It was especially delighted with "Fruehling Ohn' Ende," by C. Reinecke, and with the sailors chorus from "Afrikanerin," by G. Meyerbeer. The chorus has very good talent and will fill a long-felt need for music by a good male chorus, providing the members are faithful in attending rehearsals. Otto Lob, who also directs the Fidelia Choral Society, will begrudge neither time nor patience in his endeavor to raise the standard of the chorus so that it will compare favorably with similar organizations in New York, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. We hope that he will be successful, and we shall follow the progressive development of the Germania Maennerchor with great interest and satisfaction.

    Last Saturday evening, the Germania Maennerchor gave its first concert, which was well attended despite the extremely cold weather, which made transportation difficult. The chorus, which numbers forty members, rendered ...

    German
    II B 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 12, 1867
    First Entertainment of German Young Men's Club

    On Wednesday evening September 11, the German Young Men's Club gave its first entertainment at Library Hall, at the corner of Randolph and La Salle Streets.

    By 8 P. M. several hundred people, men and women, young men and young ladies, assembled in the hall, in compliance with requests made from the pulpits of various Protestant churches and personal invitations extended by members of the Club.

    The German Young Men's Club was organized May 9, 1866, by five students of a local American business college. The thirty-five members of the Club were born in this country,and work as clerks, bookkeepers, etc., for American firms. They are anxious to retain a knowledge of the German language.

    2

    The Club meets every Saturday evening in the social room of the Sixth Methodist Church. The meetings are conducted in the German language, and the programs, which consist of debates, readings, declamations, discussions of political issues, etc., are also all German.

    The Protestant pastors recommend the Club to the youths of their congregations in an effort to counteract the evil influences which lure many young men away from the Christian Church.

    The proceeds of this entertainment will be used to establish a library for the German Young Men's Club.

    Program

    1. Selection from "Freischuetz".......................Weber

    Theodore Falk, Pianist

    (Played on a Knabe piano)

    3

    2. Recitation, "Die Schlacht," .................. by Mr. Rieke

    3. Tableau, "Washington Crossing the Delaware"

    4. "Die Harmonie".....................................

    Double Quartet

    5. Reading, "Muttersprache," by Theodore Falk

    6. Tableau, "Constantine Sees the Cross in the Sky, and below the Cross the Words: 'In This Sign Thou Wilt Be Victorious'"

    7. "Phantasy" ........................................

    Theodore Falk, Pianist

    8. Reading by J. L. Hinners

    9. Tableau, "Liberty and Union"

    10. Overture from "The Caliph of Bagdad" ............................

    Falk and Coffin, Pianists

    11. Epilogue by J. W. Hoffmann

    12. "Gesellschaftslied"

    Double Quartet

    4

    13. Tableau, "Hector Defeats the Greeks"

    14. "Good Night" ................................

    Men's Chorus

    The program was well received. The assembly applauded frequently, showing that it appreciated the efforts of the performers. The double quartet consisted of three members of the Young Men's Club, four members of the Germaniamaennerchur, and one member of the Concordia Maennerchor....

    On Wednesday evening September 11, the German Young Men's Club gave its first entertainment at Library Hall, at the corner of Randolph and La Salle Streets. By 8 P. M. ...

    German
    III E, III C, II B 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 20, 1867
    Third Day of Soldiers' Fair Germania Maennerchor

    The attendance at the Soldiers' Fair is increasing from day to day, and consequently the receipts for the benefit of the widows and orphans of soldiers who died in the defense of the Republic are also increasing. Thus it may be safely assumed that the Fair will be a success. As announced in yesterday's Illinois Staats-Zeitung, the Germania Maennerchor, whose excellent singing is recognized also by our native Americans attracted a large crowd to the rink last night. Every seat in the large hall was occupied when, at nine o'clock, the chorus opened its program with "Das Deutsche Lied," under the direction of Hans Balatka. Although the acoustics of the hall are poor, the performance was loudly applauded.

    The chorus also rendered the "Ave Maria," and the "Pilgrims Chorus" from "Tannhaeuser".

    We hope that the example set by the Germania Maennerchor will encourage other 2choruses, such as the Concordia Maennerchor, the Freie Saengerbund, and others, to do their share toward attracting visitors to the Fair, and thus increase the receipts.

    It has been reported that the Chicago Turngemeinde (Turner's Association) will give a performance this evening, and we do not doubt it will add to the honor of the Society and to the success of the Fair.

    The attendance at the Soldiers' Fair is increasing from day to day, and consequently the receipts for the benefit of the widows and orphans of soldiers who died in the ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, IV, II B 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 30, 1871
    [Paris Has Fallen]

    Report on the reception of the news of the fall of Paris and the armistice. Spontaneous victory demonstration at a concert in the Turnhalle. Enthusiasm of which the word enthusiasm is only a weak description.

    Question if bets regarding the fall of Paris should be settled immediately, as if it was permissible to wait for more definite news.

    Report on the reception of the news of the fall of Paris and the armistice. Spontaneous victory demonstration at a concert in the Turnhalle. Enthusiasm of which the word enthusiasm ...

    German
    I G, III H, II B 1 a, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 03, 1871
    Lengthy Report on the "Phace Celebration" (Not "Victory Celebration") Held by the Germans of Chicago in Crosby's Opera House - Celebrating the Victorious War of Germany against France and the Creation of the German Reich.

    At half past seven the rush began to be terrific and even dangerous. Ten policemen were not enough to keep back the eager masses which filled all the streets leading to the Opera House. There were more Germans inside than had ever been before in one building in Chicago. The expectation of a deficit has not come true, on the contrary, in spite of the low admission fee about $800 will go to the benefit of the invalids.

    The Singers of Chicago and their director, Otto Lob, have covered themselves with glory. The program opened with the Jubilation Overture by Carl M. von Weber, so brilliantly produced that it was surpassed only later on by Beeth oven's Funeral March. In the treatment of the pianissimo and crescendo passages the example of Theodor Thomas was easily recognizable. The main speaker, Fritz Annecke spoke for twenty minutes, examining the causes of the war and of the German victory. The main cause of the first was the insolent greed for conquest of the despot Mapoleon III. Of the second, the intelligence of the Germans - "Primarily," he said, "it was intelligence in which the Germans from the private 2to the general staff were vastly superior in every direction to the Frenchmen." The main advantage derived from the war: The unification of Germany. The next aim: Realization of the ideal of freedom through humanity in order to increase the ascendancy of Germany over other nations.

    There were four impressive lebende bilder (living pictures, tableaux) arranged by the painter Conrad Diehl - but apparently somewhat diminished in effect by the non-appearance of Frau Pelissier, the Goddess of Peace in the fourth tableau, who was to recite a long somewhat involved poem. The poem remained unrecited, but is printed by the Illinois Staats Zeitung.

    The Staats Zeitung finally characterizes the celebration as "impressive though remaining somewhat behind expectations."

    At half past seven the rush began to be terrific and even dangerous. Ten policemen were not enough to keep back the eager masses which filled all the streets leading ...

    German
    I G, III A, II B 1 a, II B 2 d 1, II B 1 c 3, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 19, 1871
    [Florenz Ziegfeld]

    Mr. Florenz Ziegfield is leaving this afternoon at five for Germany with the Pittsburgh Fort Wayne train.

    He intends to make contracts with musical circles and to win capable personalities for his Conservatory. We wish him a happy journey, happy return and good luck in all his enterprizes. Last evening his many friends met in Concordia Hall to celebrate his leave taking with beer.

    Mr. Florenz Ziegfield is leaving this afternoon at five for Germany with the Pittsburgh Fort Wayne train. He intends to make contracts with musical circles and to win capable personalities ...

    German
    IV, III B 2, II B 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 24, 1871
    "A German Opera House"

    "Oh, that this headline could be used for an article about the completion of a German Opera House! .... From the German viewpoint a great German Opera House, a center for German art, is desirable. From the artistic viewpoint it is necessary and from the Capitalist point of view it would certainly be good, profitable business.

    The "Orpheus" is deliberating a long time about building on the West Side an impressive German house. The Concordia and Germania choruses for men have paid in the short time of three months an amount of rent to the opera which, if capitalized, would alone amount to half the sum a representative building might cost. We are convinced that no single institute especially neither the German House nor any of the Turnhallen, would suffer, and that a German Opera House could prosper. On Sundays we might have a German Theater by a good company. In Spring and Fall, the big entertainments of the larger associations that appeal to the general public aside from opera and concerts, furthermore, German mass meetings. And what should present us from taking in also the Americans? Those with outside affairs would be happy to be able to have on occasion, another place to go than just the opera. Has not the 2"Concordia" in Baltimore become a favorite meeting place of the Americans? Why should not Theodor Thomas be able to play just as well in a German Opera House as in Farwell Hall? We do not think that the good will is lacking, but the courage, only a small bit of Yankee spirit.

    "Oh, that this headline could be used for an article about the completion of a German Opera House! .... From the German viewpoint a great German Opera House, a center ...

    German
    II B 1 a, I C, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 03, 1871
    [Orpheus Society Gives a Concert]

    The Singing Society Orpheus gave its seventh big concert, Saturday, in the great hall of the German House. An unusual audience came together for it, almost all unknown faces from the North Side. The Orpheus can be proud to be able to draw the West Side in such great numbers to any place where it goes. Even the gallery was densely filled. In so far as the female choir appeared for the first time in public, this concert marks a new high point in the history of this society. The ladies sang "Auf dem Rhein" very laudably. The male choir sang "Heda, Wein her" quite excellently. Herr Schwartz did very well in a duet with Herr Schnadig, but had in "Des Sangers Fluch" a task that is thankless even for more highly trained artists. And again we ask for better articulation! The overture "Dichter und Bauer" executed on the guitar by Mesdames Ettlinger and Conrad, received stormy applause. Miss Carry Goldsticker did pretty well with a song. Under the direction of Otto Lob, the society constantly progresses in a gratifying way.

    The Singing Society Orpheus gave its seventh big concert, Saturday, in the great hall of the German House. An unusual audience came together for it, almost all unknown faces from ...

    German
    II B 1 a