The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 13, 1866
    The Theater "Robert and Bertram"

    Sunday's performance, as well as yesterday's, was a complete success, and proves that the local German public knows how to appreciate a really good play.

    The house was overcrowded on Sunday, and the attendance on Monday was also very gratifying to the actors. On both evenings, the audience was kept in continual laughter, and the constant applause was sufficient assurance to the players that their efforts were successful.

    We must admit that, as far as comedy is concerned, we have never seen anything better or more comical than "Robert and Bertram". The play fairly teems with "queer" situations and funny remarks, and we do not hesitate to recommend it to all hypochondriacs as a remedy.

    The scenery is very good, the stage arrangements, decorations, and costumes 2are everything one could desire, and, as for the performance itself, we do not hesitate to rate it as the best that we have seen in this country. The entire cast deserves unrestricted praise.

    The two "jolly vagabonds," Mr. Ahlfeldt and Mr. Pelost, are truly unsurpassable, and their natural wit kept the audience laughing continually. Mrs. Pelost played the part of Mrs. Ippelmeier, and Mrs. Yelguth enacted the role of Isidora Ippelmeier. Both actresses are to be commended for their marvelous performance. The Veilguth brothers also played their parts well and added no little to the success of the play. Mrs. Obernsdoerfer was truly charming in the role of Roessel. All in all, we must say that the Pelost Company is a well-trained group. There are no unnecessary interruptions in the performance, all the members have memorized their lines well, and everything is done smoothly.

    After such success, we do not have the least doubt that this comedy will draw a full house during the entire week, and we advise every lover of the theater, 3and every one who wishes to spend a pleasant evening. To attend one of the performances at the German House during the current week.

    "Robert and Bertram" will be played every night this week, beginning at 8 P. M. Tickets are seventy-five cents for box seats and fifty cents for seats in the pit.

    Sunday's performance, as well as yesterday's, was a complete success, and proves that the local German public knows how to appreciate a really good play. The house was overcrowded on ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 30, 1867
    German Theatre

    Yesterday's performance of Schiller's "Raeuber" again proved its popularity. The German House was crowded to capacity; and many persons were only able to find standing room. The smooth performance satisfied all who witnessed it.

    Mr. Hoym, who played "Karl," and Mr. Roepenack, who took the part of "Franz von Moor," were loudly applauded for their excellent presentations of these characters. The high light of Mr. Hoym's work was his performance in the fourth act. Mr. Koepenack, whose "Franz" cannot be surpassed displayed his excellent dramatic ability throughout the play.

    Miss Klein as "Amalie, "Mr. Koch as "Spiegelberg," and Mr. Schmitz as "Schweitzer," also enjoyed well-merited applause. We have attended quite a number of performances of Schiller's "Raeuber," but none that we enjoyed as much as this.

    Yesterday's performance of Schiller's "Raeuber" again proved its popularity. The German House was crowded to capacity; and many persons were only able to find standing room. The smooth performance satisfied ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 13, 1871
    (Reprint of a Letter by Mathilde Veneta (Member of the Troups of Frau Seebach) Published Originally in the Berliner Volkszeitung. the Letter Was Written from a Tour through the United States.)

    We play every day, and in addition we travel without rest over enormous distances. Often we play twice in one day. The wildest imagination can hardly realize what we have to stand in the way of punishment. From New York we went to Philadelphia, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Milwaukee, and back to Chicago. Five days on the Mississippi, and in a rush to Indianapolis and Cincinnati; in February back to New York, and again Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Buffalo. Are we not the true highwaymen? We hold 'em up on the open street, that is to say, where we discover even the slightest interest for the drama, be it only a hick town, there we exploit the public over night. The American actor would not do that! We Germans alone in this country of material acquisition are complete barbarians. We respect no ideals, we dream not of art, we only want to earn money. We should be ashamed of ourselves. But one loses one's shame living like robbers and in this magnificent country where everything seems to urge to use the moment and to squeeze the fleeting present like a lemon. The German artist's emigration is particularly strong this year, due to the war. What companies haven't been formed! People who never were prominent except with itinerant troupes now step into the limelight and compete with us - in the chase for the golden dollar. The little tribe of 2German artists, with bee-like industry, builds itself a theater anywhere, and gives Schiller and Goethe even in barns. Barbarous! But no matter, there certainly is a store of ability and gusto for hard working in our nation. And even the German actor participates in that. War takes his bread away in the home country. He packs his bag, crosses the ocean, and seeks support for his wife and child unto the very edge of the primeval wood.

    We play every day, and in addition we travel without rest over enormous distances. Often we play twice in one day. The wildest imagination can hardly realize what we have ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1, I C, III G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 03, 1871
    [The German People's Theatre]

    Sunday night the German People's Theater was opened on the North Side. The house, which has a seating capacity of 600 to 800, was filled to the point of overflow, and the public showed itself very appreciative of the energetic endeavors of the woman director, Mrs. Thielemann.

    (The very extensive prologue in verse, reprinted by the Staats Zeitung, was followed by a tableau representing Columbia, Germania, and the Goddess of Liberty, while the music played "Hail Columbia," "Die Wacht am Rhein," and "Heil Dir im Siegeskrant." Then the comedy, "Frederic the Great as Match-maker" was received with much acclaim. For the time being shows will be staged every Sunday. Mrs. Thielmann stands high in the favor of the German public of the North Side, and if she manages to please its taste, one can give the German People's Theater a favorable prognosis.)

    Sunday night the German People's Theater was opened on the North Side. The house, which has a seating capacity of 600 to 800, was filled to the point of overflow, ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 22, 1872
    [The German Theater]

    Die Wassersimpel (The Water Morons), a character comedy out of German-American life by Julius Kurzer, was given for the first time, last night, in Aurora Turn Hall. The interest every premiere arouses (especially when it treats, with an outspoken slant, a vividly discussed current question) had enticed a large crowd to fill the hall.

    The play appealed to the spectators. Some scenes, we mention only the temperance meeting, aroused stormy applause.

    Some changes we recommend. The performance lasts by far too long....... Some lines of the dialogue need to be softened. Also the text should not be too wild a mixture of German and English phrases......

    Die Wassersimpel (The Water Morons), a character comedy out of German-American life by Julius Kurzer, was given for the first time, last night, in Aurora Turn Hall. The interest every ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 19, 1872
    The Opening of the German Theater.

    The opening of the German Theater on 12th Street (Turnhalle Vorwarts) will take place September 1, with Laube's Karlsschuler, under the direction of Mr. Louis Kindt. We do not publish the list of the actors, one of them having been taken by death.

    We are advised that Mr. Kindt will replace the comedian, Mr. Ahlfeldt, deceased by the well-known Mr. Doebbelin.

    The opening of the German Theater on 12th Street (Turnhalle Vorwarts) will take place September 1, with Laube's Karlsschuler, under the direction of Mr. Louis Kindt. We do not publish ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 27, 1872
    (No headline)

    North Avenue, on which the only German theater of the North Side burned down, has once more--thanks to Mrs. Louise Thielemann--a German theater at 334 North Avenue, near Sedgwick Street. The first German performance was so favorably received in the neighborhood that at 7:30 P.M. the entire street was filled with people. Sunday the theater was still only half finished. The performance of the play "Wirrvarr" was fair but the first evening was more important as a "get-together" after such a long separation. In the meantime, building operations continue on the theater on Clybourne Avenue and Division Street. The opening of this theater is expected to take place Oct. 1.

    North Avenue, on which the only German theater of the North Side burned down, has once more--thanks to Mrs. Louise Thielemann--a German theater at 334 North Avenue, near Sedgwick Street. ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 31, 1872
    German Theaters. Tomorrow's German Plays. the Fall Season Begins Tomorrow.

    There are plays in each of the four theaters. On the Southside, Burlington Hall has been rented again by Messrs. Kost and Pelissier. As the opening play, they have chosen "Mutsegen Oder Die Neue Fanchon." The equipment and costumes are said to be very good. As first star, they have named the famous opera soubrette Miss Marie Schamnberg.

    On the Northside, Mrs. Louise Thieleman has taken over the direction at the Aurora Turnhalle. There will be plays every Sunday. The opening play will be the four act drama of Leiboldt, Drei Tage Aus Dem Leben Eines Spielers."

    2

    On the Southwest Side, Mr. Louis Kindt intends to introduce a good new repertory at the Turnhalle Vorwarts. The opening play is Laube's play, "Karlsschuler." The stage has undergone many improvements since the closing of the last season. We hope Mr. Kindt will be able to carry through his programme and especially to make the Wednesday representations attractive.

    On the Northside, provisionally, Seamours Hall, 334-336 North Ave., half a block west of Sedgwick Street, is the seat of the Muse. Mrs. Louis Thieleman will give there today her second representation.

    Now one word to the theater managers: No complaint can be made of last year as to the support of the public. There was "money" in every theatrical enterprise. Since the fire the German theaters have been a paying proposition. We know that perfection cannot be expected, that the artists of first rank do not come to Chicago. But one can expect the actors to memorize their roles, that they speak correctly and do not improvise. The theater expects the support of the public and the press. Let's hope that the theater will do its best.

    There are plays in each of the four theaters. On the Southside, Burlington Hall has been rented again by Messrs. Kost and Pelissier. As the opening play, they have chosen ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 03, 1872
    The German Theater and the German Public

    The constant complaint of the German theater that it has not been supported by the public, is answered with: "Give us a theater that will present good performances, and we shall support it." Of late, the German theater in Chicago has been showing some improvement. The play "Karlsschuler," produced by Louis Kindt, if not perfect, has nevertheless given the public a great deal of satisfaction.

    And not that the actors could be any better. How can anyone expect an actor to do his best when he is continually interrupted by a noisy audience indulging in drinking and smoking; when in the midst of a scene there suddenly resounds the crying of a baby; when there is an interruption in the act because two rough fellows are fighting, as was the case last Saturday evening in the Turnhalle Vorwärts.

    2

    We maintain our assertion that good plays are possible, but to make them so both the actors and public must cooperate. We are glad that Mr. Kindt intends to put a stop to abuses. No smoking will be allowed, waiters will not be allowed to wait on the public during the play, and children under six years of age will not be admitted.

    Last Sunday two important English newspapers, the Inter-Ocean and the Times, were represented at Turnhalle Vorwärts. Reporters from these papers had come to write about the amusements of the Germans, and their German colleagues had to use all their influence to prevent them from telling the truth. We can say that last Sunday's play represented a new epoch.

    The constant complaint of the German theater that it has not been supported by the public, is answered with: "Give us a theater that will present good performances, and we ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1, V A 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 08, 1874
    The German Theater in Chicago.

    We received the following letter.

    Dear Sir:

    The citizens from Milwaukee Avenue look with pride upon their Aurora Turnhalle. It is without doubt the most beautiful and the most elegant theater in Chicago. Also is the company of players a good one.

    Our German newspapers have given the German dramatic art little encouragement. We notice with pleasure that during the last week the Staats Zeitung has consecrated several columns to the discussion of the English theater and this gives us the hope that the German theater will receive the same consideration.

    Respectfully, Wurster & Methua.

    We hope it to be true what the gentlemen Wurster and Methua have to say about the 2city theater of the west side. Concerning the silence of the German newspapers in the past about the German theater not much need to be said. The most flattering one can say about it, is nothing. Often the German newspapers have started to support the German theater and, every time had to give up the attempt. So nothing remained but to announce the representations before hand and then keep silent. How can anything be accomplished when the talents are so dispersed, when as on the north side there are three theaters within the confines of a little space. In a short while we will visit each of our German theaters.

    We received the following letter. Dear Sir: The citizens from Milwaukee Avenue look with pride upon their Aurora Turnhalle. It is without doubt the most beautiful and the most elegant ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1, III A, II B 2 d 1