The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 18, 1862
    Concert for German Unionists Who Were Driven Out of Missouri

    The Freie Saengerbund (Liberty Chorus) has the honor of being the first organization to act in behalf of our countrymen who were driven out of Missouri. Last Thursday's issue of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung brought the news that four German families who are true to the Union had arrived in Chicago after having been expelled from Missouri, and hardly had we requested the local German societies to devise ways and means of providing for these unfortunate people--martyrs to the cause of liberty and the Union--when the Saengerbund took steps to arrange for a concert, the proceeds of which were to be devoted to the support of these refugees from Missouri.

    Hans Balatka, director of music, all members of the Light Guard Band, and the orchestra of McVickers Theatre, immediately offered to help the Saengerbund; the Board of Management of the German House furnished the hall gratis, the German newspapers donated the necessary advertising space, the German brewers and 2and wine merchants sent beer and wine, and German grocers contributed coffee, sugar, and milk.

    The brewers mentioned were Lill and Diversey, John Huck, Schott and Metz, Busch and Brand, Ludwick and Martin, Seip and Lehmann, Mueller Brothers, and Siebert and Schmidt. Wine merchants who contributed were: Baer, Koeffler, Suess, and Kronfuss. Grocers named were: Arnold Breuer and the Kirchhoff Brothers. Milkman: Schaub.

    While Mrs. Puetz, Mrs. Adolf Mueller, and Miss Therese Diehl served coffee and refreshments, the well-known host, his brother, the former mayor of Guttenberg, Mr. Georg Diehl, and Mr. John Mayer were kept busy at the bar.

    Although there was very little time to make and carry out arrangements, and though the weather invited outdoor activity, the Hall was filled to capacity by the elite of our German citizens. It was a great satisfaction for those present to note that the first call to aid oppressed citizens was answered both 3by those who were willing to give of their art and their talents, and by those who had their pocketbooks wide open.

    The success was unexpected under prevailing conditions. A total of $119.54 was given to the families who were driven out of Missouri.

    It is reported that other organizations are now making arrangements to outdo the Saengerbund. We say: Full steam ahead!

    The Freie Saengerbund (Liberty Chorus) has the honor of being the first organization to act in behalf of our countrymen who were driven out of Missouri. Last Thursday's issue of ...

    German
    I J, I G, III B 2, II D 10, II A 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 10, 1871
    [The German Opera]

    Article:-("Bismarck and Moltke are to be blamed for it") Defending the German Opera against bad reviews in Tribune and Evening Post. "Shall the spleen against the German successes in the political field be vented on the German opera?" It almost seems so...Bon Juan has been given here several times and has been a horrid failure, but the press gave it favorable reviews. Now comes the German Opera it gives it far better, than it was ever given here before. The Tribune and Evening Post have only to scold, not a word of recognition. One gives Faust-it is the same story The Italian and English Operas which have been here before never tackled such immense jobs as Tannhsnser, Fidelio, Die Zauber Flote(The magic Flute)...Before even a member arrived in Chicago, the opera was being harmed. Peregoine Pickle said in his aesthetic survey last Sunday; we are looking forward toward this opera because it is said to bring good German music and because we can enjoy it without kid gloves and silk gowns, because the German Opera demands no "style." That may have been meant well, but it hurt-thousands of Americans who only go to the Opera on account of the"kid gloves and the silk frocks remained away."

    Article:-("Bismarck and Moltke are to be blamed for it") Defending the German Opera against bad reviews in Tribune and Evening Post. "Shall the spleen against the German successes in the ...

    German
    II A 3 b, I C, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 11, 1871
    Article on the German Opera.

    The Prima Donna, Frau Lichtmay surpasses even Madame Parpa Rosa. Mr. Bernhard, is a vigorous German tenor, no consumptive little tenor Tenorchen) after American fashion. Beyond all doubt the German Opera is the best Opera that ever visited Chicago.-and yet it is again only the poorer German public that faithfully fills the gallery, while the fashionable German would come perhaps if tickets were selling for $4.00 as they did for Nilsson. Everytime something great and beautiful has come(from Germany) Boston, Philadelphia and St. Louis have paid due homage, only Chicago coldly refuses to do its part. Just because the other Americans keep away the Germans should make it a point of honor to attend. There is no lack of money, because one does not miss other entertainments. If it is lack of interest in art, if it is indifference for everything that does not also fill the stomach, why don't they confess so openly.

    (On the same page-a long and enthusiastic review of the opera "The Tewess")

    The Prima Donna, Frau Lichtmay surpasses even Madame Parpa Rosa. Mr. Bernhard, is a vigorous German tenor, no consumptive little tenor Tenorchen) after American fashion. Beyond all doubt the German ...

    German
    II A 3 b, I C, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 28, 1871
    [Thomas' Orchestra]

    Yesterday's fourth concert of the Thomas Orchestra in Farwell Hall was like all former ones attended by an elegant and appreciative public. Miss Mehlig got special applause.

    The orchestra numbers were again executed with that precision and verve which have made Mr. Thomas famous.

    Yesterday's fourth concert of the Thomas Orchestra in Farwell Hall was like all former ones attended by an elegant and appreciative public. Miss Mehlig got special applause. The orchestra numbers ...

    German
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 20, 1871
    [Theodore Thomas]

    Among all the praises that one has showered over Theodor Thomas and his brilliant orchestra one always forgets to mention one of his merits that people in Chicago should be especially able to appreciate. This is that he begins his concerts always punctually at 8 P. M. In all our theaters and with all our concerts the announcement,"start at 8 o'clock" is a lie.

    Anybody who goes to a performance in the Opera, or in the Dearborn Theater or to a recital of Mrs. Nilsson with the idea that it will start at 8 o'clock can be sure to have to wait for a quarter or half an hour. Thomas was practically, the only director who did not permit himself to be impressed by the fashionable people who are always late, and who could be depended upon to give at 8 o'clock the sign to gebin, unperturbed by no matter many silk gowns there were rustling on the staircase.

    Among all the praises that one has showered over Theodor Thomas and his brilliant orchestra one always forgets to mention one of his merits that people in Chicago should be ...

    German
    IV, II A 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 27, 1871
    [A New Teacher for the Ziegfeld Conservatory]

    Mr. Florenz Ziegfield has partly attained the aim of his journey to Germany by hiring a singing teacher for his conservatory.

    We read in the Leipziger Tageblatt of June 4:- "Just as England has found through the Leipzig Conservatory a great number of able performers and teachers, so the fame of the School is also more and more penetrating America... At the newly opened, grandstyle Conservatory in Chicago the singer recently graduated from Leipzig. Mr. James Gill, from Paisley near Glasgow, Scotland, has been engaged to teach singing. This talented and well-trained artist should all the better be able to collaborate fruitfully with Mr. Ziegfield, as Mr. Ziegfield, too, is a former student of the Leipzig Music Academy.

    Mr. Florenz Ziegfield has partly attained the aim of his journey to Germany by hiring a singing teacher for his conservatory. We read in the Leipziger Tageblatt of June 4:- ...

    German
    II A 3 b, III H, II B 2 f, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 05, 1874
    Concerts in Lincoln Park (Editorial)

    The first concert of the season will be given tomorrow at Lincoln Park. It will be an important event in the history of music in the United States, for it will be the first free concert to be held in a public park. All attempts to arrange similar concerts in New York have failed.

    Chicago may congratulate itself upon having introduced a custom which neigh-boring communities will soon follow, and which will later be general through-out the country. It is certain to have very beneficial results. However, tomorrow's concert, and the ones to follow could not be presented if it were not for the Germans of Chicago who on November 4 defended their right to arrange such entertainments on Sunday, successfully opposing the advocates of temperance who sought to have legislation enacted that would make it an offense to provide or listen to any but sacred music on Sunday.

    2

    Our working men, especially those who are not financially able to attend concerts during the week, have looked forward to these Sunday concerts with great pleasure, and perhaps with much patience also. This form of recreation is of much greater importance to a diligent laborer forced to work six days a week to shelter, clothe, and feed himself and his family, than an Italian opera to a wealthy person. And the rich are duty-bound to do what they can to maintain this source of pleasure and education for the benefit of the working class. It is their duty to contribute the money necessary to make these concerts a success. Sufficient funds are on hand to pay the expenses connected with a number of concerts, but more money is needed; and it must be contributed by our Germans. This is an enterprise of the Germans of this city, and the cost must be met by them. Americans as a group are opposed to Sunday concerts and will not contribute for them. They collect funds for their Saturday concerts and give more than is needed for that purpose. Now it is up to the Germans to do their share. The Illinois Staats-Zeitung will gladly accept contributions and acknowledge their receipt in the newspaper columns at regular intervals.

    The first concert of the season will be given tomorrow at Lincoln Park. It will be an important event in the history of music in the United States, for it ...

    German
    II A 3 b, I B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 01, 1875
    The German Musicians Benefit Program for Carl Sir

    As previously reported, last Sunday's benefit concert for Carl Sir, which was given by our local German musicians at the North Side Turner Hall, proved highly successful, both financially and artistically. The Committee on Arrangements is fully convinced that the net proceeds will exceed five hundred dollars and perhaps even reach six hundred dollars.

    In connection with this matter Mr. Sir asked us to publish the following:

    "To the Editor and Staff.

    "Dear Sirs: The friendly and energetic support which the local German press gave my benefit concert greatly contributed to its eventual success, I hope that you will also find space in your valued publication for this expression of gratitude.

    2

    "Because of an accident I am compelled henceforth to give up my vocation as a musician. I feel eternally grateful to my esteemed and beloved colleagues for their highly successful efforts in my behalf. I therefore express in this manner my thanks to the Arrangements Committee, Messrs. H. Braun, H. Schultz, W. Schumacher and Charles Sehnert; to the music directors, Messrs. Hans Balatka, Loesch, Francis A. Hoffmann, and C. Nietschke; as well as to my colleagues, and I assure them that I shall never forget their genuine friendship.

    "To the German public goes much of the credit for the success of the evening, however, for they responded generously and attended the performance in large numbers. This evidence of interest has inspired me with hopes that I may be successful in a new vocation.

    "Thanking you sincerely for your kind intercession, I remain very respectfully,

    "Carl Sir."

    As previously reported, last Sunday's benefit concert for Carl Sir, which was given by our local German musicians at the North Side Turner Hall, proved highly successful, both financially and ...

    German
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 18, 1875
    Lincoln Park Concerts To Our German Fellow Citizens (Editorial)

    We are informed that the North Side Railroad Company and various others have refused to contribute money for the Lincoln Park concerts, if any of these performances are given on Sunday. Consequently many have followed this precedent and have also refused [to make contributions].

    While we cannot argue with private citizens about the Sunday question as long as they do not interfere with other people's Sunday diversions, we might wish, nevertheless, that they delve into their surplus funds and help....others enjoy this day. But we face a different situation with the North Side Railroad Company. This corporation operates its trains on Sunday, makes a profit thereby, and cannot, therefore, attribute its refusal to piety. Its conduct 2appears rather incomprehensible, particularly when one considers that a single Sunday concert, combined with fair weather, will bring the company an income three and four times its contribution.

    But we do not manage the North Side Railroad Company's business, and it must know what furthers its interests.

    However, it would be regrettable if the Sunday concerts failed to materialize because of the actions of this company and of others.

    In order to prevent any conflict because of divergent views, the Lincoln Park Commission has decided to accept special contributions for Sunday and Saturday concerts.

    Now it depends only upon a liberal-minded public, the German and American groups which enjoy Sabbath-day music, to realize Sunday concerts--to prove 3to the other side that its money is not needed.

    Summer is a brief period and not more than twelve concerts can be given. One concert costs one hundred and ten dollars, and thirteen to fourteen hundred dollars would defray the total cost.

    If all our prosperous Germans take an interest--and we entertain no doubts on that score--if the owners of summer gardens [Translator's note: Summer gardens: by this term the German understands picnic grounds, beer gardens, etc.] and refreshment places in the upper part of the city who derive considerable profit from the park concerts do their fair share, it would be a simple matter to raise the required sum. We believe that even the less prosperous will give contributions commensurate with their income.

    Let the Germans show that they desire these public concerts and that a small sacrifice does not matter to them when their views about Sunday amusements are involved.

    4

    As a start, the Illinois Staats-Zeitung pledges twenty-five dollars.

    Who will follow our lead?

    We are informed that the North Side Railroad Company and various others have refused to contribute money for the Lincoln Park concerts, if any of these performances are given on ...

    German
    II A 3 b, I B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 23, 1875
    The Toledo.

    All those, who used to visit the old Toledo on Washington St. will be glad to learn that the brothers Kaltenbach have opened a new Restaurant which also bears the name Toledo.

    The new place is at 135-141 East Madison St. Its arrangement is most modern and elegant. An excellent musical program will be offered by the German Ladies Band under the direction of the famous artist Miss Bertha Neubers.

    The well known orchestrion, the greatest musical mechanical wonder of the world, will also play some new concert compositions.

    Thus the Toledo, which opens its doors tonight, will be a first class eating and entertainment place.

    All those, who used to visit the old Toledo on Washington St. will be glad to learn that the brothers Kaltenbach have opened a new Restaurant which also bears the ...

    German
    II A 2, II A 3 b