The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 03, 1879
    Anton Buscher

    Anton Buscher, the wood carver, died after a long illness at his home on May Street. The deceased was born in Gamburg, Grand Dutchy of Baden, in 1825. He showed great talent for wood carving during his early youth and eventually this craft became his life's work. Coming to America, twenty-four years ago, he stayed in New York three years and then settled in Chicago, where he lived for the last twenty-one years. Within a short time he became well known as an expert wood carver and builder of altars, and there is hardly a Catholic church in the country which cannot show some of his work. His most imposing production is the main altar of the Jesuit Church of Chicago. Mr. Buscher's life was dedicated to his art. He associated with few people but was highly esteemed by those who knew him.

    He is survived by his widow and four children; the oldest, a son, is studying at the Academy of Art, in Munich, Germany.

    The funeral will be held at St. Francis Church, tomorrow, at nine o'clock 2in the morning.

    His personal friend of long standing, Reverend Caluelage, will officiate at the services.

    Anton Buscher, the wood carver, died after a long illness at his home on May Street. The deceased was born in Gamburg, Grand Dutchy of Baden, in 1825. He showed ...

    German
    II A 3 a, V A 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 13, 1890
    Swedish Sloyd to Be Introduced at the Chicago Schools

    Dr. Alice Stockman, who just has returned from Sweden, where she has specialized in a thorough study of Swedish Sloyd, and the methods of instructions used over there, delivered a lecture the other day on the subject in question before the Industrial Art Association. Meeting in the Women's Hall of the Art Institute, Dr. Stockman spoke in high terms of the advantages and benefits of a child's education. It broadens the visions, and lays foundations for practical development, she said as she strongly advocated the introduction of the system in the Chicago public schools. A special Sloyd work-table, which she brought with her from Sweden was exhibited and demonstrated. A general discussion ensued and resulted in the adoption of a resolution recommending the introduction of the Sloyd System in two of the public schools, the Normal Park and the Armour. More than 150 men and women attended the lecture and several newcomers were enrolled as members of the Association.

    Dr. Alice Stockman, who just has returned from Sweden, where she has specialized in a thorough study of Swedish Sloyd, and the methods of instructions used over there, delivered a ...

    Swedish
    II A 3 a, III H, I A 1 a, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 04, 1891
    The German Building.

    We herewith give you an illustration of the new German Building reproduced from Der Westen (The West, a German paper, Translated.) The object of this creation is to produce an edifice, whereby the higher ideals of the German population may find stimulation and satisfaction from a social standpoint and at the same time construct the building in such a manner, that the proceeds therefrom will defray the maintenance expense, which is considerable. It was a very difficult problem for the administration.

    The main purpose of the building is to provide a "German Theatre" where performances will be given daily; this required considerable space, not only on the ground level but it included five floors and, as there are many more assembly halls, it was found necessary to resort to sky scraper construction, in order to add sufficient rooms, so that the income from rents could defray the expense.

    This made it inadvisable to select one of the academic historic styles for the facade. Neither antiquity, the mediaeval age nor the present period, only the ultra modern time has succeeded in perfecting vertical transportation to its present 2degree of excellence which was most essential, because of the ever increasing congestion into the preferred (?) districts of a city and this system was unknown to the ancients. To the classic styles and the Renaissance which developed therefrom with its serene, deliberate treatment, its strong horizontal lines, with the definitely prescribed proportions for the various dimensions, this competition to scale the sky is simply something atrocious when architectural appearance is considered, and all attempts to combine these unfriendly elements into an harmonious whole, have failed. Even if the Gothic, vertical lines have developed structures of the highest artistic merit, these were always strictly monumental buildings, which were not required to serve a useful purpose. In our case it was not desired to build a high tower in honor of the Lord, something lofty that reaches towards heaven, but it was demanded to erect an entire building, 165 feet high, on an area of 1,000 square feet. (Translator's note: Subsequent dimensions in the same article, quote an area of 3,000 square feet on the 10th floor.) Yet the sense for beauty had to be considered and it must not be forgotten, that the building has been dedicated to a communal spirt, to a longing towards an ideal, by citizens of a free city, adherents of a people who advanced far in culture and in conforming to all this, the utilization of every conceivable space was something which could not be ignored. Besides, one 3is confronted with Chicago's swampy soil, which imposes further limitations. That made it impossible to make the plan of the building conform to the definite patterns of some historic style. Just as the masters of the classic Greek, the Roman, Romanesque and Gothic architecture, and just as the artists of the Italian, French and German Renaissance added to the bequeathed wisdom, by bringing to it new thought and phantasy, in order to fulfill the demands of their contemporaries, had to consider available building materials, the dexterity of the obtainable artisans and trades, which brought a gradual architectural development throughout the centuries, and just as in by gone ages the epochal builders, perhaps even unawarely, founded new styles slowly, subtly,by alterations here and there so also it became the task of the Administration of the "Chicago German Opera House Company" and the architects, to add their share in creating the new archictural style of the twentieth century.

    No heavy quarried stone or brick was to be used for walls, and arches, instead steel beams and rods, riveted together formed a skeleton, which was clothes with hollow tile. Economic reasons demanded many windows and precluded large wall surfaces.Sunshine and air should be available to all parts of the building. The gigantic 4pillars of the Greeks, the arches... of the Romans, the umbrageous, romantic colonnades of the romanesque, the Norman and Gothic designs with their ornamental and admirable treatment of each motion....were not to be copied...We intend to give a more detailed account later....

    The plot of ground is 80 feet on Randolph Street, a depth of 181½ feet towards the alley, the latter is 18 feet wide.

    The basement contains the necessary, large assortment of machinery, dressing rooms, meeting rooms, storage rooms for the stage and a restaurant fashioned in the manner of a German Rathskeller where beer is also available.

    On the ground level is the forty feet wide entrance, next to it on each side a space to be rented for restaurant purposes. The theater, similar to the auditorium, can be reached from the main floor, likewise the second floor. It will have 1,257 seats and rises to the fifth floor which allows a considerable grade for the floor level and galleries, it enables every one in the audience to have an unobstricted view of the stage. It is also one of the characteristics of this theater, that the galleries are supported by iron posts, which eliminates all pillars inside of the theater.

    5

    On each side of the theater, exits will be provided which lead... into the alley. On the main floor are two foyers, each gallery has one... Iron, steel, marble, slate and concrete are used on the stage, for stairways, the loft above the stage, galleries, etc., to prevent serious fires. The stage will be supplied with the artificial horizont, which our readers probably know from the auditorium. It was copied from German theaters...Mechanical methods shall be the best available and, aside from the auditorium, it will be the only nearly fireproof stage in America.

    The area of the stage will be 40 x 80 feet. Height of stage from procenium to attic which contains the scenery, 71 feet. Illumination for theater and audience requires 1,400 electric lamps. Fresh air, steam heated by coils, is supplied by two fans, having a capacity of 2½ million cubic feet per hour; distribution is obtained without noticeable draft....

    Other public halls are on the 12th floor, one with 600, the other 250 seats. Both can be used as dance halls, large reception and dressing rooms are provided. The 11th floor, will be used entirely by a German business men's club, which will be organized in the near future. This space provides for dressing, reading, play, billiard and dining rooms, etc., the 10th floor will be used solely for a restaurant 6of 3,000 square feet and a number of smaller, private dining rooms and kitchen.

    For hotel purposes 131 rooms with 38 baths and 10 rooms for the personal are also available. Besides these the reception and business rooms found customarily in hostelries of the first rank.

    For ventilation throughout the halls and rooms, kitchen, bathrooms, etc, and the saloon in the basement, five fans are used which are electrically driven. 2,500 electric lights... excluding the theater will be used. Steam heat is used.

    The foundation calls for 900 piles 30 feet long, to be driven into the ground... steel and concrete above this.

    The theater proper is surrounded by a wall, three feet thick. On it the 25 foot high, steel supports are mounted, on which the remaining eight floors rest. The balance of the construction consists of riveted steel pillars and beams. All connections are riveted. The vertical and horizontal sections are filled with hollow tile. All stairs are made of marble, slate and iron. Four passenger and one freight elevators connect all floors.

    7

    The artistic embellishments and the difficulties of construction will be treated in a separate chapter later; illustrations will be included.

    We herewith give you an illustration of the new German Building reproduced from Der Westen (The West, a German paper, Translated.) The object of this creation is to produce an ...

    German
    III C, II F, II A 3 a, II A 3 d 1
  • Reform Advocate -- May 15, 1891
    [Various Activities]

    The annual meeting of the Jewish Training School was held on Tuesday night in the Sinai Temple vestry rooms. The Training School was organized for the purpose of helping the children of the hapless victims of Russians who settle here in Chicago.

    It endeavored to make of them useful citizens, and send them out in later years equipped to make a decent livelihood for themselves. The course of study is divided into three departments. The Kindergarten, the Primary Department, and the Grammar Department. It was designed to cover twelve years.

    The children are enrolled at the age of three years in the Kindergarten Class. In this class, is laid the foundation of future education. By means of a variety of fitting songs and dances and by a large number of interesting games and exercises, the slumbering mental powers of the child are rationally awakened, and later on he brings to his studies, activity, attention and vivacity. 180 children are enrolled in the Kindergarten Class.

    2

    The Primary Department is divided into four classes, each of which has a class instructor who teaches the ordinary branches, while special branches are taught by specialists. The course of study in English branches include Arithmetic, Reading, Spelling, Penmanship, Elementary Geography, and language. Upon completing four years in this grade, the child is prepared to enter upon more advanced work. He is able to pronounce and spell ordinary words correctly, and is capable of using whole numbers and fractions in their written and oral form. He is acquainted, in a general way, with the people and great industries of different parts of the world, and can express his acquired knowledge in simple but correct English. History is taught in a simple way, as are also Sewing, Free-hand Drawing, Slojd and Paste-board work, Gymnastics and Music. 280 pupils are enrolled in the four primary grades.

    The Grammar Department also consists of four classes. The instruction, imparted by special teachers only, embraces: 1) English (Reading Writing, Grammar and Composition). 2) Systematic History and Geography. 3) Arithmetic, Geometry and Algebra (the latter in the two highest classes only). 4) Physics and Chemistry 3(by experiment only). 5) Natural History (Zoology in winter, Botany in spring and fall). 6) German. 7) Art (Modeling, Free-hand Drawing and Designing). 8) Mechanics (Wood-work, Bench-work, Machine-work (Wood and Metal for boys), Sewing, cutting and fitting, (Dress-making for girls). 9) Gymnastics and Music.

    About 250 pupils are enrolled in the Grammar Department.

    All these branches are now being raught in the school. The difficult lesson of cleanliness has been learned by the cildren and through Mothers' meetings, we have won the confidence and co-operation of the parents.

    The night school, under the charge of our Superintendent, educates some 300 adults in the elements of our language and the history of our country, as well as in Book-keeping and Dressmaking. These classes have accomplished incalculable good.

    The financial reports showed that the total receipts had been $59,171.61, and the total disbursements, $54,855.88, leaving a balance of $4,315.73. The cost of the 4of the grounds and building, complete, was $52,276.01.

    The buget for the coming year estimates the expenses at $17,000, and the receipts at $10,000. The matter of devising ways and means to meet the deficit was referred to the new Board of Directors.

    The election for the eight new directors resulted as follows: Mrs. E. Mandel, Mrs. M. Rosnebaum, Mrs. M. Loeb, J. L. Gatzert and Mr. H. B. Frank. Mrs. Witkowsky and Mr. Hefter were elected to fill the places of Mrs. Harry Meyer and Mr. Julius Rosenthal, the remainder were re-elected.

    The meeting then adjourned.

    The annual meeting of the Jewish Training School was held on Tuesday night in the Sinai Temple vestry rooms. The Training School was organized for the purpose of helping the ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 f, I A 3, II A 3 b, II A 3 a, I A 1 a
  • Reform Advocate -- July 16, 1892
    (No headline)

    Mme. Fennie Bloomfield-Zeisler sailed last week for Southampton. She will go to London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Dresden, Vienna, Bayreuth and the Tyrol. She will play at the musical exhibition at Vienna, and probably at a number of other places, returning about the middle of August.

    Mme. Fennie Bloomfield-Zeisler sailed last week for Southampton. She will go to London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Dresden, Vienna, Bayreuth and the Tyrol. She will play at the musical exhibition at ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 01, 1893
    Polish-American Participation in the Lwow Exposition of 1894 (Editorial)

    In accordance with our promise given to the readers of Dziennik Chicagoski, we return to a discussion of the Polish-American participation in the Lwow Exposition of 1894. We are leaving the article in the Emigration Review on the side for the time being, and turn oar attention to the letter received by Mr. Peter Kiolbassa from the directors of the Exposition.

    The letter, from its text, constitutes a formal invitation of the Poles in America to participate in the Lwow Exposition. The letter justifies our participation by the fact that 1894 is the hundredth anniversary of Kosciuszko's insurrection; that we should use the-results of our peacetime efferts as evidence to outsiders that we continue to exist and that we have a right to exist. On this principle, the directors of the exposition intend 2it to be not merely a display of provincial talent, but instead, a general manifestation involving all provinces of Poland, as far as political conditions will permit, of course.

    American Polonia has already been characteristically christened as the "fourth partition" by people in the old country. It is the least known "partition," if we may call it thus, for it has only recently been discovered by our brethren in Poland. But it attracts wide interest in Galicia and Poznan; it is discussed secretly in Russian Poland. In spite of the increased facilities of communication, in spite of the fact that we seek to acquaint our countrymen in Poland with our activities in many different ways, they still seem to be inaccurately informed. Until not long ago, they were completely unaware of our existence and development; today they probably overrate our strength and significance. If once we accept the premise that Poles living in America ought to retain their nationality, that they are under obligation to their mother country, we must admit that closer relations between American Polonia and its homeland are imperative. These relations ought to begin with mutual understanding. We admit also that occasion for such an understanding is presented by the Lwow Exposition, which, as we see, 3is planned on a broad scale and which will, no doubt, draw numerous visitors from all three divisions of Poland. And so it is quite logical that the directors should turn to American Polonia with a request that we submit examples of our work here to the Exposition. We ought not be unrepresented in this "national exhibition," as the letter describes it, since we consider ourselves a fragment of the Polish nation. And so, we ought to accept the invitation tendered by the directors of the exposition and prepare ourselves for participation in it. This is how the matter presents itself to our minds. We hope, too, that this neighborly viewpoint will be accepted by the Poles in America generally.

    More complicated are the questions: What form will our participation take? Who is to direct it? How large a fund is necessary for this purpose and how shall it be raised?

    While the letter from Lwow presents the matter in a general way, yet it already speaks of a Polish-American pavilion. In our opinion, this desire is a bit too bold. Obviously, the directors of the Exposition cannot be 4accurately informed, and hence they propose a project which presupposes that the Poles in America are able to carry a considerable expense. This is not true. We know well that our people in America are poor people, already weighed down with a great many burdens. Again, our people are almost exclusively workingmen, though a few are engaged in business. There are practically no independent Polish-American manufacturers. We have no industrial specimens to offer, therefore; even craftsmen are rare among us. Thus it can readily be seen that we would have too few specimens of manufacture, handicraft, etc., to necessitate a separate pavilion for their display. In place of this, our exhibit should give our brethren across the ocean a picture of our religious, intellectual, and national life. We build schools and churches, we publish books and newspapers, we organize societies for every conceivable purpose; this is the phase of our existence most interesting to our mother country, and we should strive to create the clearest possible conception of it. Our exhibit might consist of photographs of Polish schools and churches in America, bound volumes of our newspapers, books published here. We might show them the constitutions of our societies, their emblems, brochures, and in some cases, handwritten manuscripts. Such a 5collection would not be difficult to assemble, it could be sent to Poland at low cost, and a place could be found for its display at the Exposition. Best of all, it would give a clear picture of our life here. It may be that this picture would not altogether be complimentary, but at least it would be a truthful one. Obviously, aside from the above-mentioned exhibit, the completion of which would be more or less a public duty, it would be left to the initiative of private individuals, if such willing persons could be found, to supply specimens of industry, handicraft, etc. So much for the form which, in our opinion, our participation in the Lwow Exposition should take.

    The two remaining questions present no serious difficulties. Who shall direct it? Obviously, our newspapers first, and afterward, people of good will and action. Mr. Kiolbassa requested that we publish the letter he received and that all other Polish newspapers reprint it in order to disseminate the idea--to open discussion of the matter in the newspaper column. After it has been thoroughly discussed from all angles, Mr. Kiolbassa will call a mass meeting of Polish-American citizens to talk the matter over. It is practically certain that volunteers will be found to lend their services to 6the cause. This procedure should be followed by other Polish colonies, and eventually a central committee could be formed to take charge.

    Should the exhibit be arranged according to the lines we have proposed, the fund required would be small. The task of raising the money required would be comparatively simple; the fund could be satisfied partly by public donation and partly through the efforts of the individuals and societies most concerned.

    The matter of representation of our newspapers in the Exposition is primarily a question for newspapermen. We will leave its discussion for another time.

    In accordance with our promise given to the readers of Dziennik Chicagoski, we return to a discussion of the Polish-American participation in the Lwow Exposition of 1894. We are leaving ...

    Polish
    III H, IV, I C, III C, II D 1, II A 2, I B 3 c, I A 2 a, II A 3 a, II B 2 d 3, II B 2 d 1, II B 1 c 3
  • Abendpost -- July 21, 1893
    The World's Fair The Speckhardt Clock in the German House a Most Remarkable Work of Art at the Fair

    Daily from 11 A.M. until 4 P.M. hundreds of people assemble at the Southern side Chapel of the German House, to view one of the greatest art productions that the World's Fair contains. This is the clock build by Mr. Gustav Speckhardt, the court clock-maker of Prince Alfons of Bavaria, that is here since the opening of the fair, but suffered so much during transportation, that only until a week ago it was possible to make it work. Two things are to be admired on this clock: the case and the mechanism. The first is a wonderful structure, a masterpiece of the wood carving art. It is hard for the onlooker to believe that this is a creation of a newer date; one is more inclined to suppose that this wonderful structure, kept in the old Gothic style, comes from the fourteenth century.

    The substructure stands on a low pedestal and is carried by snails and turtles, 2the heads of the latter actually move. Around the pedestal is a gallery decorated in the center by an eagle, fixed in Hupp's way. The eagle with Patrona Maria on its chest symbolizes the State of Bavaria and its patron-saint. Further, we see at the gallery the escutcheons of Bavaria and of the United States of North America, also at the right and left coats of arms with the colors of Nuremberg and Mount Kofel, near Oberammergau. Into this pedestal are also inlaid two beautifully etched tablets, containing the wonderful song of E. Von Destouches, "The Salute of the Cross," which refers to the escutcheon with Mount Kofel and is lettered in excellent old Gothic characters. In the interior of the pedestal are the works of an organ. On the middle structure we see the old testament represented by Moses and the Jewish prophets. A gallery-like embrace is drawn over these figures, whose Gothic designs carry various forms.

    But the chief points of interest for the visitor develop themselves above this gallery. In a stage-like niche is shown to us the entire history of Christ's passion, in the form of the Oberammergau passion play, so divided 3into groups that after every hour a new group appears in the niche, starting at the "entry of Christ into Jerusalem" to the "Resurrection." The figures of all these groups move and the organ plays a hymn relating to the scene. All of the figures of the passion play were made by so-called "Herrgott Schnitzers" (Lord God Carvers) and therefore represent an originality on the clock.

    To the left and right we see the exhibition of two oriental street views in splendid sculpture of Heinrich Blab which were glazed by the painter Wilhelm Ritter. The perspective effect is masterly. Below the street pictures we read in the Latin language: "If thou hast only perceived on this thine day, what serves thee to thy peace!" On pillars stand the apostles Peter, Paul, James and John as representatives of the new testament. Tower-like rises the clock house over the center niche. Here is the dial face with the sun in the center; on the hands are the moon and the stars. Below the dial we see on a fluttering ribbon the year numbers 1492 and 1892. In the left corner we notice a part of the globe, on which is etched the word "Amerika"; at the right, Columbus, standing in a little boat. A handsome, striking clock is contained in a separate 4little tower. It carries the words, on the side of the death which strikes the quarter hours, "As the thief in the night." (Added: So comes the hour of death:) On the side of the angel which strikes the full hours, we read: "Estote Parati" (Be ready). At the top of the little tower is the cock, announcing the morning and evening by loud crowing. As a crowning feature of the work, there rises 15 feet high, the "Last Judgment" represented by three angels playing trumpets. Instead of the hand indicating the seconds is used the "Egg of Columbus" which grows out of a flower. It is represented by a regular chicken's egg and makes one full turn every minute. The case contains fourteen clock works, from the big tower clock-work to the small watch-work, and the creation as a whole is designed and executed in all its details by the above-mentioned Mr. Speckhardt. The architecture for it was created by Mr. Clemens Kessler, and the sculptural works were modeled and carved by the sculptor, Mr. Blab. The work of the carpenter is excellent, and so is the painting. The entire work is an outstanding work of art and is continuously beseiged by visitors. In order to give everybody a chance to see the wonderful 5mechanism function, the work is wound up at intervals of one hour.

    Daily from 11 A.M. until 4 P.M. hundreds of people assemble at the Southern side Chapel of the German House, to view one of the greatest art productions that the ...

    German
    II A 3 a, III H, II B 1 c 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- July 25, 1893
    [Uses 6, 235 Pieces for One Table]

    Mr. Juszczenc, a Pole living on West Division Street, has just completed a very remarkable piece of work. He has constructed an occasional table of 6,235 pieces of wood without the use of a single nail or a bit of glue. It is a very beautiful and original piece of work. Persons who would like to buy it, can apply to Dziennik Chicagoski for further information.

    Mr. Juszczenc, a Pole living on West Division Street, has just completed a very remarkable piece of work. He has constructed an occasional table of 6,235 pieces of wood without ...

    Polish
    II A 3 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 05, 1893
    Lecture of Polish Art Given Polish Art Section Inaugurated

    Yesterday should be long remembered by Chicago Poles. The day was marked by two noteworthy occurrences, two important manifestations that give proof of our national vigor.

    The lecture on Polish art was given yesterday at the Memorial Art Palace on the lake front; the Polish Art Section was also inaugurated yesterday at the Fine Arts Palace in Jackson Park.

    The lecture was delivered in Hall number three at the Memorial Art Palace. The rather small hall was filled to capacity, and among the audience a great many Poles were to be found. The lecture was prepared by Mr. M. Zmigrodzki and delivered by M. Drzemala. The text of the lecture will appear in 2Monday's issue. It was carefully prepared and presented a clear outline of the history of our art, past and present. The lecturer concluded by emphasizing that we have risen to our present cultural level in spite of political oppression. In general, the lecture held the attention of the audience and was applauded vigorously at its conclusion.

    The lecture itself was admirably illustrated by numerous reproductions of the more important works of our masters, which were used by the speaker as examples. After he had finished, these specimens were circulated among the audience. "Torches of Nero," "Rejtan," "Union," and especially the three Grottger Cycles attracted general attention and called forth numerous questions, which were willingly answered by the Poles who were present. The most important paintings were explained by Mr. Zmigrodzki. Grottger's martyrological cycle of our nation was particularly appreciated.

    3

    In a word, the lecture was successful. It served once again to bring our cause to general attention, it demonstrated our cultural level, and it retraced the injustices which we have suffered.

    Most of those who attended the lecture were present at the inauguration of a Polish Art Section at the Palace of Fine Arts in Jackson Park. The program began at 4:15, in Hall number sixty-two. The little hall was filled mostly with Poles, but a number of Americans, newspaper reporters, etc. were present. The program was opened with a speech in English by Peter Kiolbassa. He explained the purpose of the gathering and pointed out the reasons for the comparatively small number of Polish paintings exhibited. He spoke of political conditions in Poland, conditions which barely permitted our artists to exhibit their work as Poles at the World's Fair. Finally, he called the attention of those present to three paintings by Malczewski--"Death Of An Exiled Woman," symbolizing Polish martyrdom; "Jadwiga," symbolizing our 4spiritual strength; and "Wernyhora," prophesying the resurrection of Poland. These paintings appeal directly to our hearts, and to the hearts of all peoples; in any case, these and other works prove definitely that we work and progress despite political oppression.

    After this beautiful address, which was applauded enthusiastically, the gathering moved to the gallery on the second floor, at Mr. Kiolbassa's request. The next speaker, M. Drzemala, spoke on the significance of this first exhibit of Polish art in America. He called attention to the good points in the works of our artists, and to the fact that these paintings are our only representation at the Fair and that they remind people from all corners of the world of the name of Poland. In conclusion, he acknowledged the noble American hospitality, which permits us to take our place beside other nations despite political conditions in Europe.

    5

    Professor Dunikowski spoke next in the name of the visitors from Poland, expressing his joy at being able to view the work of Polish genius at the Exposition. "In view of our presence here and our efforts", he said, "Poland is not lost--nor will it be lost!" ("Polska Nie Zginela--i Nie Zginie!")

    Mr. Basset, one of the directors of the Exposition's congresses, expressed himself sympathetically on the activity of the Poles and on our art in particular.

    The last Polish address was made by H. Nagiel, who said that it was a joy to see Polish paintings exhibited under the same roof with the artistic accomplishments of all other nations, that our Polish tongue, resounding through these halls, protests against the political oblivion to which we have been doomed. After calling attention to a few of the paintings exhibited, the speaker concluded by paying homage to the Stars and Stripes, under the 6protection of which we may participate in this Exposition--as Poles. All of the addresses were generously applauded. Mr. Nagiel's speech closed the inauguration program. After viewing the exhibit, the invited guests proceeded to the Polish restaurant, where the Committee of 101 had prepared a modest reception. A few hours were spent thus in pleasant companionship over a glass of wine.

    The inauguration was eminently successful; everyone was satisfied and happy. All sections of Chicago's Polonia were numerously represented by their more important citizens. The Polish clergy was represented by the Reverends J. Barzynski, A. Nowicki, F. Lange, and E. Siedlaczek. Most of the visitors from Poland who are in Chicago were also present. Representatives of both Zwiazek (Polish National Alliance) and n (Polish Roman Catholic Union) attended; in fact, all parties and factions were represented.

    A majority of today's American newspapers have made favorable comments on the inauguration.

    Yesterday should be long remembered by Chicago Poles. The day was marked by two noteworthy occurrences, two important manifestations that give proof of our national vigor. The lecture on Polish ...

    Polish
    II B 2 g, IV, III C, III H, III B 2, II A 3 c, II A 3 a
  • Lietuva -- August 12, 1893
    To the Lithuanian Musicians

    August 13, Sunday, 4:30 P. M. there will be a meeting of all Chicago Lithuanian musicians. We are inviting all musicians, no matter what instrument they play. We wish to organize a band of Lithuanians only. Therefore, all musicians please come.

    The meeting will be held at St. Rokosz Hall, 749 W. 18th st.

    The Lithuanian Musicians.

    August 13, Sunday, 4:30 P. M. there will be a meeting of all Chicago Lithuanian musicians. We are inviting all musicians, no matter what instrument they play. We wish to ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 3 a, II B 1 a