The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 21, 1861
    Meat of Dead Animals Sold in City (Editorial)

    Last week we made a tour of North Kinzie Street. Of course we saw no large business establishments, such as one sees on Clark Street or Lake Street, but we did see a number of butcher shops, and instinctively our thoughts turned to the sale of human beings in the South. Here we saw meat the color of which could not be discerned; it was neither red, white, nor yellow, but had a tinge of black, an indication that the animals were dead before they were butchered. We accidentally met two experienced butchers and they confirmed our fears.

    Are there no officers in our city who have the authority to put a stop to this fraud? Why control the bakers but not the butchers who are guilty of many serious violations of the law, and whose offenses are much more detrimental to the health of the community than those of the bakers?

    2

    There are people who make a regular business of buying dead or half-dead animals and selling the meat to commission men. We hope that our most wise city fathers will pass an ordinance similar to the one which is in force in the East, making it mandatory that all meat offered for sale must be brought to the public market, which is under the control of the city--that is the express purpose of maintaining a public market, but ours is never used. [Translator's note: The author does not reveal, nor is the writer able to ascertain in what manner the city controlled the quality of goods offered for sale in the public market.]

    Last week we made a tour of North Kinzie Street. Of course we saw no large business establishments, such as one sees on Clark Street or Lake Street, but we ...

    German
    I M, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 23, 1862
    Report on Annual Ball of the German Society of Chicago

    Receipts

    Sale of tickets $214.00
    Lottery tickets 37.75
    Refreshments 111.40
    Donations 1.50
    Total $364.65

    Disbursements

    Music $ 25.00
    Hall 8.00
    Printing 6.50
    Miscellaneous 2.00
    2
    Counterfeit $ 3.00
    Total 44.50
    Net Proceeds $319.85

    In the name of the needy who receive help from the German Society of Chicago I heartily thank all who participated in this ball. The work of the magnaminous, sympathetic ladies whose efforts made the ball a success is hereby gratefully acknowledged. Some of them were more successful than others in selling tickets, nevertheless all of them deserve honorable mention. I am particularly grateful to Miss Grommes who handled the sale of lottery tickets; also to Mr. Huck, Bush and Brand, Hiller, Fischer and Lehmann, Wilhelh Gottfried and Schoenhoefer, Bier-John, and Siebert for their generous donations of beer.

    As usual, the press gave us their splendid support.

    3

    Later we shall have more to say about the German Society of Chicago and its benevolent activity.

    Henry Greenbaum, President.

    Receipts <table> <tr> <td>Sale of tickets</td> <td>$214.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Lottery tickets</td> <td>37.75</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Refreshments</td> <td>111.40</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Donations</td> <td>1.50</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Total</td> <td>$364.65</td> </tr> </table> Disbursements <table> <tr> <td>Music</td> ...

    German
    III B 2, II A 2, II D 10, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 29, 1863
    Realty News

    A large crew of laborers is at present engaged in tearing down a number of old buildings on the west side of North Clark Street, between Kinzie and North Water Streets, to make room for a large brick building, which will be erected by Mr. Charles Ulich, and which will extend from North Water Street to Kinzie Street. The first story will contain a number of stores, which have already been rented at a very high rental. The second story will be arranged for offices, and the third story, which will measure 25 feet in height, will be divided into two spacious halls. The larger one will be used as a dance hall, and the smaller will serve as a meeting place for the Masonic Order. The cost of the structure is estimated at $100,000.

    A large crew of laborers is at present engaged in tearing down a number of old buildings on the west side of North Clark Street, between Kinzie and North Water ...

    German
    II F, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 16, 1863
    German Industry and its Results A Visit to the Brewery of Mr. John A. Huck

    On the shore of Lake Michigan, not far from the Catholic cemetery, on the North Side of Chicago, you will find the brewery of John A. Huck which is one of the largest and best equipped plants of its kind that we have ever seen.

    Mr. Huck did not inherit this brewery from his forefathers, nor did he have the necessary money to erect the magnificent buildings when he came here from Europe.

    No, when he left his home in the beautiful valley of the Rhine, he possessed no wealth whatsoever; but he did have resources which are of much more value than money in a country where industry has free course; he had an alert mind and an abundance of energy and determination.

    2

    The great buildings which so proudly shine forth in their splendor on Lake Michigan's shore and harbor and which hold an abundance of that tasty, wholesome, amber fluid in their cellars, are monuments of the successful application of diligence, energy, and perseverance. It was but a few years ago that John A. Huck came to this city. At that time Chicago was only an unimportant village, and Mr. Huck established a small business proportionate to the size of the city and the size of his pocketbook. His enterprise was successful; his business grew rapidly in size and importance, and today the John A. Huck Brewery is favorably known for its fine product throughout the entire northwestern part of the United States.

    However, the business of this industrious citizen has not yet reached the peak of its expansion. On our visit we were informed that plans are being made to add a third story to the two-story brick brewery this summer and to transfer the enormous cooling vats to the new addition. Height and distance are of no significance in Huck's Brewery; for a forty horsepower steam engine is used to perform all the heavy work in the mash vat as well as in the 3malt building and in the cellar.

    Mr. Huck has done something which formerly was regarded as impossible; he has constructed beer cellars in sandy soil--the first and only cellars of their kind in Chicago. Above these cellars, and extending over their entire length and width, are three adjoining icehouses, the walls of which are surrounded by a double wooden wall filled with tanner's bark; the barrels of beer lie between thick rows of ice. The temperature is always very low, even during the hottest days of summer.

    The new malt house is a three-story brick structure in which there are two cross-arched malt cellars 150 feet long. At each end of this building are two enormous ovens in which 1500 bushels of malt can be roasted at one time.

    From this brief description the reader can get some idea of the extent of Mr. Huck's business and of the great progress the brewing industry has made in the Northwest during the past few years.

    4

    However, it is not the size of the plant, nor its modern equipment, but the quality of the product which is the chief element of Mr. Huck's success. [Translator's note: The author is not consistent, for he has previously attributed Mr. Huck's success to his industry and determination.]

    John Anton Huck was born May 15, 1819, at Ottenhofen, Grand Duchy of Baden, Germany. After graduating from an elementary school, he received extensive theoretical and practical instruction in brewing.

    He emigrated from Germany in the year 1845, and spent one year in the employ of a brewery located in Kingston, Canada. Late in 1846 he came to Chicago where he met Johann Schneider, and the two men became partners in a brewing business. They rented the block bounded by Chicago Avenue, Rush Street, Superior Street, and Cass Street, and erected a small brewery on the site. Much of the vacant part of the plot was used as a picnic ground where many of the German clubs and societies of that day gathered for their annual outings. In 1850 Mr. Schneider contracted the "gold fever" and went to 5California, after selling his share of the business to Mr. Huck.

    Mr. Huck was very successful in his business venture. In 1854 he built a brick brewery at State and Schiller Streets, and in 1854 he erected an addition. By 1871 he owned the largest and best equipped brewery in the West. It was considered to be a model plant by the leading brewers of the day.

    On October 10, 1871, Mr. Huck's brewery was destroyed by fire, and he devoted the rest of his life to small deals in real estate, doing much towards rebuilding Chicago.

    He was a member of the Chicago City Council for two years and held membership in the Masonic Order and other societies.

    He married Josephine Eckerly in Germany on August 12, 1840. Their union was blessed with nine children. He died January 28, 1878.

    On the shore of Lake Michigan, not far from the Catholic cemetery, on the North Side of Chicago, you will find the brewery of John A. Huck which is one ...

    German
    II A 2, IV, II F
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 05, 1864
    The State Savings Institution (Editorial)

    In yesterday's Evening Journal, the following notice appeared under the above heading:

    "The undersigned merchants and businessmen of Chicago do hereby unite in condemning the course pursued by the Illinois Staats-Zeitung in creating a panic and causing a 'run' on the above-named institution. We have every reason to believe that the bank is sound--that it is able and willing to pay all its obligations on demand--and that it has a large surplus of assets (readily convertible into cash) in excess of all liabilities. Depositors who have any doubts concerning the solvency of the bank, and who have any fears for their money, can verify the sound condition of the bank and its ability to pay by calling upon any merchant or banker in Chicago."

    2

    Since the Illinois Staats-Zeitung is published in the German language, and since none of the signers of the above notice is, to our knowledge, sufficiently conversant with that tongue, we should like to ask, with all due respect, whether the gentlemen who have united in condemning the course of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung have any positive knowledge of the course which they are so prompt in condemning? From the assurance given in the above notice that the bank is sound, we have every reason to believe, indeed we are firmly convinced, that our self-appointed judges were incorrectly led to the opinion that we had attacked the solvency or soundness of the State Savings Institution. Anybody who is able to read the Illinois-Staats-Zeitung can see that such was not the case, and that nobody would regret the inability of this bank to pay its liabilities more than we, inasmuch as all the creditors of said institution are our own countrymen.

    The signers of the above notice are, of course aware, that the Illinois Savings Institution has for the last four years used the advertising columns of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung to recommend its services, and that the Illinois 3Staats-Zeitung often commented very favorably upon the safety of the charter of said financial institution. This advertisement was not changed after August 1, 1863, when the Illinois Savings Institution began to operate under a new charter. In January, 1864, the accounts of the depositors were transferred from the Illinois Savings Institution to the State Savings Institution without any notice whatever to the depositors. In fact, none of the depositors were aware that the Institution has been changed from a savings bank to a discount bank. The advertisement of the Illinois Savings Institution was not withdrawn or altered in our columns, and depositors who could not read English were led, under the circumstances, to believe from the advertisements still appearing in our columns that they had invested in the Illinois Savings Institution, whereas in reality their funds had been transferred to the State Savings Institution.

    We would have justly been considered guilty of gross negligence in the performance of our duties as public journalists if, by withholding notice of this transfer from our readers, we had assisted in persuading our countrymen to 4believe that they still had their money in a savings bank when in reality it was deposited in a discount bank.

    We hope the signers of the above notice have exercised greater care in their investigation of the affairs of the State Savings Institution, before vouching for its solvency and soundness, than in their determination of the course taken by the Illinois Staats-Zeitung before uniting to condemn that course. Would not the gentlemen who have appointed themselves judges of our procedure do better to unite in condemning the course of the managers of the State Savings Institution?

    In yesterday's Evening Journal, the following notice appeared under the above heading: "The undersigned merchants and businessmen of Chicago do hereby unite in condemning the course pursued by the Illinois ...

    German
    II A 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 03, 1866
    Vox Populi [Warning to Workers]

    To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung! An advertisement in your newspaper stated that the Chicago Employment Association, which has an office at 118 South Clark Street, wanted two hundred carpenters, and promised to secure employment for them at a wage of five dollars a day. I and two other carpenters went to the office of the Association, and after paying a fee of two dollars, we were sent to the C. R. Pool Company, in Memphis, Tennessee. Transportation cost us twelve dollars each. We traveled to Cairo via the Illinois Central Railroad (second class), thence to Memphis by steamer (second deck). Upon our arrival, we immediately went to the office of the C. R. Pool Company and were told that it neither needed nor had ordered any carpenters. Thus we were obliged to return to Chicago. We spent the money for our fares and paid the freight charges for transporting our tools, but did not attain our object. I therefore warn all workers against having 2any dealings with the Chicago Employment Association.

    Respectfully,

    Hermann Harms.

    To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung! An advertisement in your newspaper stated that the Chicago Employment Association, which has an office at 118 South Clark Street, wanted two hundred ...

    German
    II A 2, I D 2 c
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 08, 1866
    Statement

    Chicago, Illinois,

    May 7, 1866.

    After having served faithfully, and, I believe successfully, on the editorial staff of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, for five years, the undersigned hereby gives notice that he has severed his connection with that publication.

    Wilhelm Rapp

    Chicago, Illinois,

    May 8, 1866.

    In Mr. Wilhelm Rapp, whose affiliation with the Illinois Staats-Zeitung was terminated yesterday, as may be seen from the above statement, we have lost a very able associate, and we regret that he is leaving us. He has devoted five 2years of faithful and efficient service to this newspaper, giving his time and talents during a very trying period.

    Beginning today, Dr. Adolph Wiesner, for many years the Baltimore and New York correspondent of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung and formerly editor of the Turnzeitung, will take the place of Wilhelm Rapp in our editorial department.

    Illinois Staats-Zeitung Company.

    Chicago, Illinois, May 7, 1866. After having served faithfully, and, I believe successfully, on the editorial staff of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, for five years, the undersigned hereby gives notice that ...

    German
    II B 2 d 1, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1867
    A.Sink's Academic Institute

    "I take great pleasure in publicly thanking the parents and students of the evening classes for their oral and written expressions of appreciation of the excellency of my school.

    "At the same time I wish to state that in an effort to render myself worthy of your esteem I shall continue to apply all diligence and faithfulness to my duties as an educator.

    "Respectfully,

    "A. Sink."

    We believe that we would be doing an able and conscientious, but very modest educator a grave injustice, if we published the above announcement without adding some remarks of our own, especially if we neglected to state that Mr. Sink is a well qualified and successful teacher, and that he has at heart the 2welfare of the children entrusted to his care. We are not recommending him blindly, for our testimony is based upon long observation and experience. We have attended the examinations of his classes and were astonished at the results. In his special classes, penmanship and mathematics, his children have made rapid strides, and we unhesitatingly advise all persons seeking an advanced course in commercial subjects to enroll in his school.

    "I take great pleasure in publicly thanking the parents and students of the evening classes for their oral and written expressions of appreciation of the excellency of my school. "At ...

    German
    II B 2 f, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 12, 1867
    Dyhrenfurth's Institute (Editorial)

    We have repeatedly called the attention of our readers to the above excellent institution, which is probably unsurpassed by any of its kind in the entire West, and of which Chicago can justly be proud.

    A new course will begin after Easter, and we cannot forego the opportunity to recommend this widely known and highly praised school to all parents and guardians who wish to give their children a good practical education. Mr. Dyhrenfurth has set the rates for tuition exceptionally low. All the professors are recognized as able and thoroughly educated teachers, and the knowledge acquired by children who attend the Institute, and the positions which many of the graduates hold in the social and business world of our city are proof of the diligence with which the instructors apply themselves to their 2various tasks.

    The Institute consists of a classical department, a school for girls and a commercial college. There are five classes in the classical department. The three lower classes offer a preparatory course, and the two upper classes a high school course. The purpose of the preparatory course is to give the pupil a good practical education which will enable him to enter the commercial school. In the upper classes, a complete course is offered in classics and mathematics, in preparation for attendance at a university. In these classes, Greek, Latin, French, German, and English are taught; also geometry, zoology, geography, rhetoric, drawing, chemistry, mathematics, etc. Each subject is taught by a man who has specialized in that field.

    The new school for girls which Mr. Dyhrenfurth has established has received favorable recognition, and the number of pupils attending it has steadily increased. The purpose of this branch of the Institute is to give girls a 3truly "feminine" education in domestic arts and in the supervision of a household. This school fills a long-felt need and is ably presided over by Miss Lee.

    We need add nothing about the excellence of the commercial department, for it is well known among local businessmen and is recognized over the entire West. We know from experience that every businessman prefers graduates from Dyhrenfurth's Commercial Institute to all other applicants, and that the students of this school always obtain positions in the best firms.

    Recently, Mr. Dyhrenfurth established a monthly magazine under the name The College Monthly. The motto of the publication is "scientia potestas". The first issue has just reached us. It contains several very excellent and instructive articles, some of them written by teachers or professors, and others by pupils of the upper grades. They are abundant proof of the ability of both teachers and students. Thus the Institute continues to progress in 4every respect, and Mr. Dyhrenfurt is leaving nothing undone to promote the general thorough training of those who attend his school.

    We have repeatedly called the attention of our readers to the above excellent institution, which is probably unsurpassed by any of its kind in the entire West, and of which ...

    German
    II B 2 f, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 26, 1867
    A. Kraushaar's Clasp Improvement

    Everyone who is familiar with the history of piano manufacturing knows that more than fifty years the European manufacturers introduced the clasp as an improvement upon the generally used bridge. The clasp supports the string just opposite the stroke of the hammer, while the bridge pin supports the string from the side only. Thus the use of the bridge pin made it impossible to obtain the required rigidity and stability for clearness and fullness of musical tone. Only a few local manufacturers have introduced the clasp. One of them claims he applied the device in 1836; another says he attached it to the iron-framed piano, while another claims he used it in connection with the strings of a violin. It cannot be denied that the introduction of the iron frame has greatly improved the modern piano; but the system, now in vogue, of placing the entire weight upon the iron frame by attaching the clasps to the iron frame with screws is advantageous only to a certain extent. It will be readily understood that the iron frame, though it makes for stability, hampers the production of clear musical tones. Only wood can develop and support the 2vibrations of the strings, as experience teaches, and why should we not benefit by what sound reason has taught us for many years? The solution of the problem was to attach the clasps in such a way that contact with iron was avoided. This problem has not been solved.

    Mr. Kraushaar, of Kraushaar and Company, 19 North Huston Street, has done everything that can be done in this respect. He has devised a new system of attaching the clasps, and his system avoids the above mentioned faults. By his system the vibration of the strings is supported and reinforced. All tones are full, clear, and pleasing to the sensitive musical ear, and we do not doubt that the benefits of the excellent instrument which Kraushaar and Company have made during the time they have been in business in Chicago will gain for them a host of new admirers and satisfied customers.

    Everyone who is familiar with the history of piano manufacturing knows that more than fifty years the European manufacturers introduced the clasp as an improvement upon the generally used bridge. ...

    German
    II A 2