The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 18, 1861
    Reducing the Salary of County Employees (Editorial)

    We hope that the Republican delegation [Translator's note: The author evidently refers to the elected members of the State Legislature.] will not forget that before election the Republican party promised to reduce the salaries of certain county employees who have been receiving their wages in the form of fees.

    In former times, when there were not many court cases, the amount they realized was not too great; but under present conditions these fees represent a sum which is far in excess of the value of the services which the respective workers render. we believe that a special law should be enacted to regulate the salaries of the Cook County employees to the extent that whenever it is possible, a fixed sum should be established as their pay, and when this is not possible, as for instance in case the fees are not paid in advance, the fees be reduced to such an extent that the resulting income would not be as large as it is now; then there Will not be as much dishonest competition among the aspirants to these 2offices. Since the present incumbents declared before they were elected last November that they would willingly submit to a reduction of pay, it is the duty of the Legislature, especially the delegation from Cook County, to take them at their word, and put an and to the ridiculously high salaries which have long been a cause of offense.

    We hope that the Republican delegation [Translator's note: The author evidently refers to the elected members of the State Legislature.] will not forget that before election the Republican party promised ...

    German
    I F 6
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 24, 1861
    For the Union and against Treason (Editorial)

    It is a fact that the South not only abolished freedom of speech and freedom of the press long ago, but has also become guilty of high treason. It is not necessary to point out again that this situation is merely the result of a policy which has been consistently followed for eight years by the leaders of the slave states, who have made the National Government their tool. This policy consists of continually demanding new concessions from the North and attempting to force the North to accede to these demands by repeated threats to secede.

    The South, as has been mentioned before, has abolished all liberties guaranteed in the Constitution, and has applied violent and treasonable measures against the Union. Hence, it cannot be denied that the Union has the right and the duty to oppose these rebellious violators of the 2Constitution, and to force them to do their duty toward the Union.

    On this matter there can be but one opinion among all those who respect the Constitution and love the Union, and the Northern Democratic press, with a few exceptions, is working hand in hand with the Republican press. The Union must be preserved, and if this cannot be accomplished by peaceful means, force must be used.

    The South claims that it was driven to secession by the election of Lincoln; but how can an act that is authorized by and is in conformance with the Constitution, be advanced as an excuse for high treason? And the election of Lincoln was a constitutional act. After the Democratic party had administered the affairs of the country in a most shameful manner for eight years, and had been guilty of corruption worse than any that our history has ever known, the people have applied the means of relief provided by the Constitution, and have cast their votes for a candidate whom they trust and whom they expect to put an end to thievery, corruption, 3and treason. The majority of the people have declared themselves in favor of a different system, and have thereby merely employed their constitutional rights. Who will dare to deny this?

    The facts have thus been clearly established. The majority of the people disapproved of the corrupt Democratic administration and its hostile attitude toward liberty, and, in conformance with the Constitution, they have elected a president. But now the minority declares that it will not abide by the will of the majority, that it will not respect the Constitution, and that it will use forceful measures to enforce its will.

    No citizen who is loyal to the Constitution and friendly to the Union can waver in his judgment in cases of this kind; he will have to side with the party which bases its rights upon the Constitution and upon the decision made by the majority in accordance with the Constitution, and which will not tolerate the destruction of the Constitution and the Union. We are happy to state that we have read this same opinion in many other Democratic 4newspapers, and we shall leave it to them to cast light on the disgraceful attitude which the local National-Demokrat assumes when it levels the charge of oppression against all who condemn the mob rule of the South and advise that stern measures be taken against the traitors in order to maintain the Union; and when it denounces as cowardly rascals those who, in agreement with Democratic newspapers like the Seebote, Cincinnati Volksfreund, etc., express themselves in favor of an energetic defense of the Union. Such language, by the way, condemns itself, and anyone who uses it against the Union, can be only a traitor or a maniac.

    It is a fact that the South not only abolished freedom of speech and freedom of the press long ago, but has also become guilty of high treason. It is ...

    German
    I G, I J, I F 6
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 14, 1861
    Reform in Handling of Tax Money (Editorial)

    The current Auditor's report contains complaints of a very grave nature about the Treasurer of Cook County. These charges point to the necessity of revising the laws which govern the delivery of money collected by county treasurers. From page seventy-seven of the Auditor's report we note that although they have collected it the treasurers of forty-two counties have not yet turned over $521,093 in tax money. And the Treasurer of Cook County is among them; he is $225,102 in arrears.

    According to a telegraphic report published in the Chicago Democrat, the authorities at Springfield received money from the Treasurer of Cook County during the latter part of December; in other words, part of the tax money of 1860 was used to cover a part of the deficit of 1859.

    2

    It is important that the people of Cook County know whether or not their Treasurer has covered the above deficit of $225,102, which had not reached the State Auditor December 1, 1860, as required by law.

    We do not claim that there will be a similar deficit on December 1, 1861, but it cannot be denied that the County Treasurer directs a personal interest against delaying the collection of taxes, while half the taxpayers are interested in delaying collection. The state, as is indicated in this instance, does not receive the money within a specified time anyway. The collections, the property of the people, remain in the possession of the County Treasurer for months. He deposits the money in banks and draws interest.

    The taxes for the year 1859 need not have been collected in the spring of 1860, since the money was not sent to the State Treasurer until the latter part of December.

    Now we can understand why the County Treasurer objected to postponing the 3collection of the taxes for 1860 (due this year). As far as he is concerned, it is not only a matter of keeping the money in his possession and for his personal gain, but also of using the taxes of 1860 to cover the deficit caused by not delivering the tax money collected for the year 1859. .The fact that so many county treasurers are guilty of the same neglect of duty does not excuse the Treasurer of Cook County; most assuredly it does not excuse the enormous deficit of December 1, 1860.

    In his report the State Auditor declared that changes in the law are necessary to prevent treasurers from using tax collections of later years to cover the deficits of previous years, and he recommends that county authorities refuse to permit treasurers to collect current taxes unless they show satisfactory evidence that they have delivered previous collections. Apparently, however, further steps must be taken. The County Supervisors have often audited the books of our County Treasurer and always reported them in good order. A law is necessary which makes it impossible for the county treasurer to use the money of the people for usurious purposes; a bill, making it mandatory that 4tax money be forwarded to the state at least once a month, is before the Legislature, and we urge that it be adopted immediately. This bill is in the interest of the people as well as the collectors, who will thus be freed from temptation.

    The current Auditor's report contains complaints of a very grave nature about the Treasurer of Cook County. These charges point to the necessity of revising the laws which govern the ...

    German
    I J, I F 6
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 05, 1861
    To the Voters of the 57th District by Johann Heinrich Muehlke

    Although I did not seek the honorable position of delegate to the Constitutional Convention, I deem it my duty to accept the candidacy, since, to my knowledge, no other German has been placed in nomination in any part of this state, and I consider it necessary that the Germans be represented in this all important body which is to establish the fundamental principles of the new constitution.

    With reference to the position which I shall assume, I would like to say that I consider gold and silver to be the best and only reliable mediums of exchange; that I am convinced that too high salaries paid to public officials and too long terms of office are the basic causes of corruption; that the office of County Clerk should be separate from the office of Clerk of Probate Court, and the office of Recorder separate from the office of Clerk of the 2Circuit Court; that the authority to force local laws upon the people of a city should be taken from the state legislature; and that the so-called "Black Laws" should be deleted from the statutes.

    If I am elected, I shall endeavor to embody these principles in the contemplated new constitution, and to protect the civil and political rights of all citizens by adoption.

    Although I did not seek the honorable position of delegate to the Constitutional Convention, I deem it my duty to accept the candidacy, since, to my knowledge, no other German ...

    German
    I F 3, I E, I F 6, I F 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 05, 1861
    Town Clerk of South Chicago (Editorial)

    We consider it to be our duty to call the attention of German voters who live on the South Side to the fact that Mr. Leonhardt Lamperts, one of our ablest German fellow citizens, is a candidate for the office of Town Clerk. Mr. Lamperts served as gauger for several years. Although that public office pays but a very small salary, Lamperts' work was very satisfactory to our businessmen as well as to the public. In gratitude for these faithful labors, and in recognition of his many efforts in behalf of the cause of the Union, Mr. Lamperts was driven from office by the present Mayor to make room for a man who was willing to be the tool of the Court-House clique. Mr. Lamperts was nominated for the office of Town Clerk at the convention which was held at Bryan's Hall, and he is well fitted to perform the duties of this office, the income from which is also exceedingly small. We hope that Mr. Lamperts will be elected.

    We consider it to be our duty to call the attention of German voters who live on the South Side to the fact that Mr. Leonhardt Lamperts, one of our ...

    German
    I F 1, I J, I F 6
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 05, 1861
    Down with the Bank Law (Editorial)

    At tomorrow's election, let no German voter fail to cast a ballot marked against "the banking law on a specie basis". This law is not founded on a "specie basis". The so-called Union Bank is not even required to have a single dollar in gold in its treasury. The words "on a specie basis" have been smuggled into the wording by the most corrupt of all legislatures in order to defraud the people. Down with the infamous bank law!

    At tomorrow's election, let no German voter fail to cast a ballot marked against "the banking law on a specie basis". This law is not founded on a "specie basis". ...

    German
    I F 6, I F 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 24, 1862
    The End of Chicago's Police Board (Editorial)

    Last year, as everybody knows, the corrupt State Legislature enacted a new police law for the city of Chicago, and had the effrontery to utterly disregard the rights of the people, by depriving it of the authority to elect the members of the police board for two, four, and six years, respectively. The secret intention of taking this unheard of despotic measure was to install the Courthouse clique in the well-paying political offices next fall-with the help of the police board. To gain this objective the State Legislature conferred upon the Governor the rights which it stole from the people. He proceeded to appoint to these positions only those persons ready to go through fire and water for the Courthouse clique. Nevertheless the people cleaned house at the Courthouse in the election last fall, and thus the primary object of the Legislature's infamous violation of the democratic principle of self-government was not attained.

    2

    The Constitutional Convention has resolved that the people of Chicago are to indicate at the next municipal election (April 2) whether or not they consider themselves able to elect their city officials, and whether they still need the guardianship of Mr. Yates and his lieutenant, Franz A. Hoffmann.

    If the people declare themselves of age, then the police bill which was forced upon the people by the corrupt Legislature will be null and void. Then it will be the duty of the next Legislature to pass a new police law to be submitted to the sovereign voters of the city of Chicago for acceptance or rejection. That procedure is meet, right, and salutary.

    There can be no doubt that the people of Chicago will loudly proclaim that they are of age, and that the Germans in this city will be united on the question just as surely as election day will dawn. The social freedom of the Germans was threatened when the members of the police board were shoved down the throats of the citizenry, and they will see to it that the 3police commissioners, one and all, from uncle to nephew, will be forced to relinquish their positions. For the people did not and never would have placed these ignorant leeches in such responsible offices.

    John Wentworth is the sponsor of the action taken by the Constitutional Convention, and he had the wholehearted support of Mr. Muehlke.

    Last year, as everybody knows, the corrupt State Legislature enacted a new police law for the city of Chicago, and had the effrontery to utterly disregard the rights of the ...

    German
    I F 6, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 24, 1862
    Fraud Committed through Soldiers' Votes

    In regards to the fraud which was perpetrated through the votes of Illinois Regiments in the attempt to force acceptance of the Egyptian Constitution upon the people of that state, the Quincy Tribune says:

    "The Commissioners whose duty it is to receive the ballots cast by the members of the Illinois Regiments on the new Constitution are already at work, according to the Herald. Among the four thousand ballots which they received, only sixty were against adoption, since most of the soldiers assume that the proposed document is a democratic regulation. In this way the proportion of numerical strength between Democrats and Republicans in the Army will also be established. The Army will furnish at least forty to fifty thousand votes for acceptance of the new Constitution."

    What ingenousness, indeed. Even we who are residents of the state of Illinois cannot form an opinion of the document at this time, for we have no 2official copy of it, and what the newspapers print about it is by no means reliable. And the soldiers in camp are in a less likely position; they have not even seen the newspapers, and they are voting on God only knows what kind of representations, or misrepresentations which will be amply supplied by the host of Democratic barkeepers who exchanged their saloon aprons for soldiers' uniforms. And that is supposed to be an election! The three Commissioners could just as well have voted for the whole Army during the first session of the Constitutional Convention, and before that body had started its work.

    The lists of dead and wounded show that there are many soldiers who hail from other states in the Illinois Regiments; they hail from Missouri, Wisconsin, Indiana, etc. No objection to their voting will be raised, although none of them have the slightest interest in the matter and are entirely indifferent to the issue.

    In regards to the fraud which was perpetrated through the votes of Illinois Regiments in the attempt to force acceptance of the Egyptian Constitution upon the people of that state, ...

    German
    I J, I F 6
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 19, 1863
    Anti-Halleck Resolutions by Germans of West Side

    Last night, at a meeting of German citizens of Chicago's West Side, held at the hall of the Socialer Arbeiterverein of the former Tenth Ward, the following resolutions were adopted:

    Whereas, The present war against the Southern Rebels is being unnecessarily prolonged, chiefly because the Union leaders, especially General Halleck, are admittedly inefficient; but also as a favor to contractors and generals who are benefiting through profits and salaries, and many of our brave fighters are thus being sacrificed without reason; and

    Whereas, The Government is receiving requests from all parts of the country asking the dismissal of General Halleck and his replacement with a capable officer; and

    2

    Whereas, There are too many officers in the Union Army who deserve to be called traitors; and

    Whereas, We are convinced that the present war will not result in victory for the Union until all traitors and friends of traitors, as well as all officers who cannot or will not do their various duties, have been expelled from the Army, and men like Fremont, Sigel, Butler, Wallace, Willich, and others are put in command; and

    Whereas, It is the duty of the President of the United States to do the will of the people and to ignore the requests of unscrupulous politicians; be it therefore

    Resolved, That the President be requested to relieve inefficient General Halleck of his command, and to court-martial him because of inability and neglect of duty, especially on account of the Corinth affair. Be it further

    3

    Resolved, That the President be asked to grant Generals Fremont, Sigel, Willich, and Butler, who have proved that they are capable and conscientious leaders, independent positions; to relieve all other inefficient and traitorous officers of their commissions; to punish them in accordance with martial law; to prosecute the war with greater vigor; and not to wait until the people tire of the selfish acts of politicians and take the administration of military affairs and the government of the country into their own hands. Be it further

    Resolved, That these resolutions be published in the local German and English newspapers (with the exception of the Chicago Union and the Times) and that a copy of these resolutions be sent to President Abraham Lincoln, and to Generals Fremont, Sigel, Willich, Butler, and Halleck.

    Wilhelm H. Haase, Secretary.

    Last night, at a meeting of German citizens of Chicago's West Side, held at the hall of the Socialer Arbeiterverein of the former Tenth Ward, the following resolutions were adopted: ...

    German
    III B 2, I G, I F 6, I F 5, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 21, 1863
    City Flour Ordinance (Editorial)

    In the first regular session of the City Council, Alderman Woodman introduced a flour ordinance, according to which a flour inspector was to be hired to inspect all flour sold here.

    At that time the proposed ordinance was referred to the Committee on Legislation, and was favorably reported to the Council by the Committee in the last session of the Council. The aldermen decided. to publish the ordinance and to make it the subject of final discussion and pass upon it in the next meeting (today).

    The duties of the inspector, whose engagement is recommended by the Mayor on advice of the Aldermen, are to inspect all flour brought here for sale at wholesale or retail prices or for local consumption. Anyone who delivers 2flour to Chicago or anyone who receives flour that is to be sold on commission will be required to submit it to the inspector before disposing or it, and he will have to keep it in an arrangement that will make the inspector's task convenient. Anyone caught violating this ordinance will be fined five dollars for every bag or barrel of flour which he did not have inspected.

    The inspector is authorized to collect a fee of two cents per bag or barrel for his work, and he may claim four ounces of flour from each barrel inspected.

    This ordinance is tantamount to the legal sanction of mulcting, or, to use a vulgarity, stealing.

    According to our City Charter, the City Council has the right to hire any number of inspectors, but it is questionable whether the aldermen have the authority to put a tax on commerce and thus on consumers, or to make inspection compulsory, or to demand that every poor creature who buys a twenty-five pound sack of flour pay two cents, or to permit the inspector to mulct four ounces of flour 3from a barrel, thus depriving our indigent citizens, especially children, of so much bread.

    Let us see how much the prospective inspector will realize.

    According to the report of the Board of Trade, 165,720 barrels of flour were consumed in Chicago during the past year. A large part of this quantity was sold in quarter-barrel sacks. Computing the average sale at half a barrel, 331,440 sales were made, totaling $6,628.80 at two cents per sale. And to this sum the value of the mulcted flour must be added. Figuring two cents per ounce--and that is very conservative--the flour would be worth $1,657.20. Thus the inspector's total income would be $8,266. Verily, a dirty job with filthy pay!

    And, what is more, the greater part of this ill-gotten money will be stolen, deliberately and unnecessarily stolen, from the working class, from the men who are compelled to toil in the sweat of their brows for six days of the 4week, and from their hungry wives and children.

    And lest we forget, the Board of Trade, according to its charter, is obligated to hire such inspectors to inspect all flour, if buyer and seller demand it, but not against the wish of the two parties, and not merely to mulct them of their property.

    We wonder how much the City Flour Inspector will have to pay for his appointment to this lucrative prospective position? No doubt he will have to hire an assistant to do his office work!

    In the first regular session of the City Council, Alderman Woodman introduced a flour ordinance, according to which a flour inspector was to be hired to inspect all flour sold ...

    German
    I F 6, I F 3