The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 21, 1861
    Carl Schurz and the Sardinia Embassy (Editorial)

    The appointment of an ambassador to Turin was of special interest, not because of the character of those who sought this post, but because of the eventual recognition or nonrecognition of the German Republicans of the United States. We admit that we were not favorably impressed when we learned that Mr. [Carl] Schurz had not been selected for the mission. After Governor Koerner had been defrauded of the ambassadorship at Berlin through a political coup of Mr. Judd of Chicago, Mr. Schurz was the only representative German aspirant to a foreign embassy, and he was especially entitled to the promotion, since he not only had the support of his state, as is often the case with American politicians, but also the indorsement of the Germans of every state in the Union. This support undoubtedly was evidence that the Germans of the Union wanted to be acknowledged coequal with native Americans in at least one respect--whenever appointments to 2foreign positions were in question. Their concern with Mr. Schurz was based solely on the German's desire to nominate their worthiest and ablest representative.

    They were not successful in their attempts to wrest such recognition from the national pride of native Americans; and an appointment to Rio de Janeiro can never be looked upon as adequate compensation.

    Secretary of State Seward even went so far as to establish a principle according to which all foreign-born persons will be excluded from the foreign service--if such a thing is possible. We deplore the narrow-mindedness from which this principle emanated.

    In the first place, we must not overlook the fact that foreign-born citizens who know a foreign language are best qualified to represent the United States abroad. The New York Tribune was right when it stated, in defense of Mr. Schurz's claim, that his Prussian extraction was an argument for, and not 3against, his appointment to the Court of Turin. Italy, which was liberated through the revolution brought about by the revolutionist Garibaldi, would have no scruples about recognizing the former German revolutionist, especially since he would not be serving in that capacity, but rather as an American citizen. However, we shall not enumerate the excuses which Washington offered for denying the request of Mr. Schurz, the German-American citizen par excellence. It would be useless to discuss them anyway: but the lesson which this German reversal teaches is very instructive.

    We learn from it that even the greatest services rendered by an eminent German to a political party and, in this case, to the Union itself, are not sufficient to offset the influence of American narrow-mindedness and greed for office. The battle of the Germans for recognition of their co-equality with native Americans in the Union is by no means ended, and they have no other recourse but to apply means which are more effective than either the influence of individuals, be they ever so prominent, or the 4resolutions of the Central Committee of the Republican party.

    The coequality of the Germans must be explained to the masses in city, county, and state until even the most stubborn are convinced and the feeble-minded can understand--before any attempt is made to enlighten the upper classes. Thus, it is necessary that German sheriffs be elected, and that, if possible, a German representative and German senator be seated in every state legislature in the United States, and the next step of the Germans, especially those in the northwest, should be to bring about the election of German congressmen.

    It is said that New England congressmen prevented the appointment of Mr. Schurz; and it will be the duty of the Germans to erase this score by electing German congressional representatives. In days gone by the Germans were not competent to fill public offices, but this inefficiency is being remedied in some quarters, at least to some extent, and in a short time there will be no dearth of qualified German candidates. The old adage, 5"Who does not progress must retrogress" is true close of German-Americans.

    The knowledge that their native culture was a predominant element in the progressive development of the American nation must be an incentive to the Germans of the Union to continue their collaborative efforts in shaping the social, political, and economic affairs of this nation; and, to that end they must aspire to the higher, even the highest, public offices. This must be the aim of all German-Americans for the sake of those native Americans who instinctively fear and try to avert any interference in their turbulent national matters by inexperienced elements.

    The appointment of an ambassador to Turin was of special interest, not because of the character of those who sought this post, but because of the eventual recognition or nonrecognition ...

    German
    I F 4, IV, I J, I F 5, I F 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 09, 1861
    The Chicago Press on the Appointment of Mr. George Schneider as United States Consul at Helsingoer (Editorial)

    The following article is quoted from the Chicago Tribune, September 5:

    "George Schneider, Esquire, editor-in-chief and owner of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, has been appointed United States Consul at Helsingoer (Elsinore), Denmark, and we hear that he will leave for that post very soon. It may be said that for the past twelve years his indefatigable endeavors in the publishing and political fields, during which time he made the Illinois Staats-Zeitung one of the leading journals of the United States and gained for himself an envious reputation in social and political circles, has earned for him the right to the short but pleasant rest which is in prospect for him on his trip to Europe. He takes with him the best wishes of all of his brother editors, who earnestly hope that he will soon return safely to his adopted country and city."

    2

    The Chicago Evening Star has this to say:

    "Captain George Schneider, editor and owner of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, has been appointed United States Consul at Helsingoer, Denmark. Helsingoer was made famous by Shakespeare, who selected the city for the scene of his tragedy "Hamlet" The importance of this place as a commercial or political center is not known to us, but we believe that the post is one of great consequence. We hope so, for nobody in Chicago deserves a good position more than Mr. Schneider. We have known him for few years, and during the greater part of this time we have seen him fight for freedom and against slavery, laboring to spread those principles which found their personification in the Republican party. He has made his newspaper an excellent one, and except on a very few occasions, has used its influence to promote just causes. He is a radical anti-slaver, and in his appointment, as well as in that of Mr. Z. Eastman, Esquire, who is an abolitionist of the old school, we see the proof that the Administration does not intend to deny its obligations to the radical, anti-slavery element."

    The Chicago Post remarks:

    3

    "To our great satisfaction we learn that our fellow citizen Mr. George Schneider, publisher of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, has been appointed to the United States Consulate at Helsingoer, Denmark. The post is a good one. Helsingoer lies on one of the most important trade routes leading to the Baltic Sea. Mr Schneider will do his official duties well; he is a very able man, and, as far as personal relations are concerned, he will soon win the respect and confidence of the people with whom he will be associated for some time.

    "We gladly testify to the high character of Mr. Schneider. He is an able editor and has always conducted himself like a gentleman. Even in the heat of battle and in the excitement created by the rapidly transpiring events and by the violence of party strife, he has always acted with the dignity and decorum of an honorable opponent. For ten years he did editorial work, for ten years he was an industrious partner. During the time he served this city and state he was ten times as successful as some men who had held office, and he reaped a rich harvest from the gratitude of the people. By appointing Mr. Schneider to this post Mr. Lincoln is merely performing a duty towards a political friend.

    4

    The President has selected a competent and honorable gentleman to undertake very responsible and confidential work. We will miss the friendly countenance of our friend as we wend our way through the streets of the city, and his name will no more appear on the list of journalists. But when he tires of his official position, and longs for the excitement which is always present in the life of a journalist, we hope to be able to welcome his return to his city and his profession."

    The Chicago Telegraph, a German evening newspaper which was lately established by Georg Feuchtinger, long a foreman in the printing shop of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, says:

    "President Lincoln has appointed Mr. George Schneider, one of the publishers of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, to the United States Consulate at Helsingoer, Denmark. Mr. Schneider was called to Washington by telegram, for the purpose of receiving special messages.

    "We are happy to know that the editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung has 5received honorable recognition from our Government. His publication was founded thirteen years ago, and since then it has developed from an insignificant beginning to a position of competitive equality with the largest establishments of its kind in the country. Everybody knows that the lives of editors and newspaper publishers are not beds of roses, and therefore we can sincerely congratulate our colleague upon his good fortune."

    The Chicago Evening Journal publishes the news of Mr. Schneider's appointment, but makes no comment, and the Chicago Times does not mention the appointment, very likely because the editors of that paper are still quite unfamiliar with the local publishing business and do not know Mr. Schneider personally.

    The members of the Anglo-American press, whose comments we have reported above, and one of whom (the editor of the Chicago Post), has had a long political feud with the publisher of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, have shown that they are gentlemen in the true sense of the word. We can only regret that among the representatives of the German press there is one mean fop so completely in the 6power of his jealousy and diabolical malice that he is not ashamed to slander a man under whose supervision he worked for many years, and who is just about to leave for Europe on a confidential mission for his adopted country.

    We refer our readers to an article published by Mr. Schlaeger in last Friday's issue of the so-called Chicago Union.

    The following article is quoted from the Chicago Tribune, September 5: "George Schneider, Esquire, editor-in-chief and owner of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, has been appointed United States Consul at Helsingoer (Elsinore), ...

    German
    IV, I F 5, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 09, 1861
    Let Each Citizen Serve His Country (Editorial)

    An English language publication justly complains that in many districts congressmen and senators spend the time when Congress is adjourned attending to their private affairs, and that they fail to show the slightest interest in the cause which is dear to the heart of every patriot.

    It is apparent that this conduct deserves a sharp reprimand. On account of his position, every member of Congress who possesses ability and a sense of patriotism can do much in his district to further the good cause; furthermore the people who elected him have a right to expect that he will be concerned about the interests of the public and the welfare of the nation. Pretty or forceful speeches made in Congress are praiseworthy, and they 2merit the gratitude of the country; but the duties of a representative of the people do not end therewith; he must also seek to successfully use his ability and influence outside the confines of Congress; and it is his special duty to use every means to furnish his constituents with aid. This is especially true during a crisis, at a time when all that our country stands for and everything that we esteem highly, is at stake.

    Recruiting must continue, since the Government needs many more troops, and many more subscriptions must be obtained to make the national loan a success. There is, generally speaking, much work to be done, and the ability of senators and representatives to organize and lead can be very useful; we hope that the people's representatives will not continue to neglect their duties. We refer especially to the Kentucky congressmen, about whom the newspapers of that state complain bitterly. Let them follow the example of their colleagues who have entered the army or organized regiments, and who have promoted the good cause of the Union by word and deed. When a ship is in 3great danger the captain issues the command: "All hands on deck!" This command has been heard also on the good ship "Union," and everyone who does not wish to be looked upon as a coward, or who wishes to avoid being branded a traitor to his country had better do everything in his power to keep the good ship "Union" afloat!

    An English language publication justly complains that in many districts congressmen and senators spend the time when Congress is adjourned attending to their private affairs, and that they fail to ...

    German
    I J, I G, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 24, 1862
    The End of Chicago's Police Board (Editorial)

    Last year, as everybody knows, the corrupt State Legislature enacted a new police law for the city of Chicago, and had the effrontery to utterly disregard the rights of the people, by depriving it of the authority to elect the members of the police board for two, four, and six years, respectively. The secret intention of taking this unheard of despotic measure was to install the Courthouse clique in the well-paying political offices next fall-with the help of the police board. To gain this objective the State Legislature conferred upon the Governor the rights which it stole from the people. He proceeded to appoint to these positions only those persons ready to go through fire and water for the Courthouse clique. Nevertheless the people cleaned house at the Courthouse in the election last fall, and thus the primary object of the Legislature's infamous violation of the democratic principle of self-government was not attained.

    2

    The Constitutional Convention has resolved that the people of Chicago are to indicate at the next municipal election (April 2) whether or not they consider themselves able to elect their city officials, and whether they still need the guardianship of Mr. Yates and his lieutenant, Franz A. Hoffmann.

    If the people declare themselves of age, then the police bill which was forced upon the people by the corrupt Legislature will be null and void. Then it will be the duty of the next Legislature to pass a new police law to be submitted to the sovereign voters of the city of Chicago for acceptance or rejection. That procedure is meet, right, and salutary.

    There can be no doubt that the people of Chicago will loudly proclaim that they are of age, and that the Germans in this city will be united on the question just as surely as election day will dawn. The social freedom of the Germans was threatened when the members of the police board were shoved down the throats of the citizenry, and they will see to it that the 3police commissioners, one and all, from uncle to nephew, will be forced to relinquish their positions. For the people did not and never would have placed these ignorant leeches in such responsible offices.

    John Wentworth is the sponsor of the action taken by the Constitutional Convention, and he had the wholehearted support of Mr. Muehlke.

    Last year, as everybody knows, the corrupt State Legislature enacted a new police law for the city of Chicago, and had the effrontery to utterly disregard the rights of the ...

    German
    I F 6, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 06, 1862
    Lorenzo Brentano (Editorial)

    After a bitterly fought campaign, Mr. Lorenzo Brentano, publisher and editor of this newspaper, was elected state representative from the 61st district of the state of Illinois by a large majority.

    The principles which Mr. Brentano and his friends advocated during this campaign, and which they will always support are: suppression of the Slave Rebellion, the abolition of slavery, the enactment of state laws in Illinois for the protection of laborers, especially of those German workers, farmers, and merchants who recently immigrated to the United States and are not yet acquainted with American conditions, against capitalists and real-estate speculators.

    If this program can be carried out, gigantic progress will have been made in 2the public life and moral consciousness of the Republic. For the first time in the history of the United States the people have indicated by their vote that they are in favor of abolition--for unconditional, absolute abolition which will set five million slaves at liberty, educate them to the status of free men, and thoroughly reorganize the political and private affairs of the Republic on the basis of the "inalienable rights" proclaimed by Thomas Jefferson.

    Through the results of this election, Chicago, which is the great metropolis of the Northwest, and which is making astonishingly rapid strides towards becoming one of the great cities of the world, has set a laudable example for the rest of the people of the country. And it is with great pride that we emphasize the fact that the quiet, patriotic, ambitious, and liberty loving German laborers of Chicago, and the German farmers who live in the vicinity of Chicago, have made the greatest contribution to the victory of the noble cause.

    3

    The humane spirit of Germans is asserting its influence more and more in America; it was this spirit that set forth the real ideals and the moral issue of this terrible Civil War; and this spirit will see to it that the principle of abolition, abolition that really liberates and educates unto freedom, prevails everywhere--in the National Assembly, as well as in the legislatures for the states--as it now prevails on the battlefields, where Germans are now aquitting themselves nobly and attaining great honor.

    However, while this German spirit has its advocates and champions on all battle-fields--Sigel, [Frederick] Hecker, Mersch, Schwartz, [Brigadier General Peter Joseph] Osterhaus, Willich, Schurz, and others--it was only scantily represented in the legislative bodies of the Republic.

    This fault has been partly remedied in the great and powerful state of Illinois through yesterday's election. Mr. Brentano will defend the great principles of justice and freedom in the Illinois General Assembly with the same parliamentary and legal ability that he displayed when the people of Manheim elected him to 4be their representative in the Parliament of Baden and when he defended Struve, Blind, Fickler, and others who were accused of political crimes, in the Court at Freiburg.

    Brentano will make the German name famous in Illinois and beyond its borders, just as Mr. Gustav Koerner, who is now Ambassador to the Spanish Court at Madrid, did while serving as President of the Illinois Senate.

    The election of Mr. Brentano is of special importance to Germans, local and abroad, because he will protect their interests, first of all, of course, he will look to the welfare of the Germans of Illinois, the prairie State where German immigrants have found a great field to develop their many talents and abilities.

    .....[Translator's note: The next paragraph which undoubtedly stated in what respect Mr. Bretano's election was important for Germans in Europe, has been clipped out of the paper.]

    5

    We hold that it is our duty, a duty of gratitude and honor, to co-operate diligently and indefatigably in the restoration and regeneration of the American Republic, whether it be on the battlefield, in the pressroom, or in the legislative assembly. And by doing their duty to their country, Germans believe they are doing their duty to their native country, Germany, the future of which depends entirely upon the outcome of the American War, which is being waged about the greatest gifts which can be bestowed upon man-- democracy: rule by the people. [Translator's note: Verbatim. The author does not state in what respect the outcome of the Civil War would affect the political status of Germans in Germany.]

    After a bitterly fought campaign, Mr. Lorenzo Brentano, publisher and editor of this newspaper, was elected state representative from the 61st district of the state of Illinois by a large ...

    German
    I F 5, IV, I H, I G, III D, I F 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 29, 1863
    Special Session of City Council

    Alderman Woodman presented an order for four hundred dollars in favor of Charles S. Perry for special services rendered as health officer during the past eight months. The order was unanimously approved.

    On recommendation of Alderman Comisky the Council reviewed the report on the election held April 21, 1863. It appeared that the following persons were elected to office.....

    [Translator's note: The next paragraph of this article contains a detailed report on the election. In the next paragraph a summary report is given, and I shall select from it the names of Americans of German descent.]

    Friedrich Mehring, Collector, for two years; John Schank, Assistant Engineer of the Fire Department, for two years; Constantin Kann, Alderman of the Fifth 2Ward, for two years; George Himrod, Alderman of the Tenth Ward, for two years; Christ Cusselmann, Alderman of the Twelfth Ward, for one year; David Aleckner, Alderman of the Thirteenth Ward, for one year; George von Hollen, Alderman of the Eleventh Ward, for two years; Valentin Ruh, Alderman of the Fourteenth Ward, for two years; Anton Hottinger, Alderman of the Fourteenth Ward, for one year; Henry Gymer, Constable of the Second Ward, for one year; M. Flemming, Constable of the Sixth Ward, for one year; Louis Herbst, Constable of the Twelfth Ward, for one year; John Hettinger, Constable of the Fourteenth Ward, for one year.

    Adjournment followed

    A. J. Marble, Clerk.

    Alderman Woodman presented an order for four hundred dollars in favor of Charles S. Perry for special services rendered as health officer during the past eight months. The order was ...

    German
    I F 5, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 19, 1863
    Anti-Halleck Resolutions by Germans of West Side

    Last night, at a meeting of German citizens of Chicago's West Side, held at the hall of the Socialer Arbeiterverein of the former Tenth Ward, the following resolutions were adopted:

    Whereas, The present war against the Southern Rebels is being unnecessarily prolonged, chiefly because the Union leaders, especially General Halleck, are admittedly inefficient; but also as a favor to contractors and generals who are benefiting through profits and salaries, and many of our brave fighters are thus being sacrificed without reason; and

    Whereas, The Government is receiving requests from all parts of the country asking the dismissal of General Halleck and his replacement with a capable officer; and

    2

    Whereas, There are too many officers in the Union Army who deserve to be called traitors; and

    Whereas, We are convinced that the present war will not result in victory for the Union until all traitors and friends of traitors, as well as all officers who cannot or will not do their various duties, have been expelled from the Army, and men like Fremont, Sigel, Butler, Wallace, Willich, and others are put in command; and

    Whereas, It is the duty of the President of the United States to do the will of the people and to ignore the requests of unscrupulous politicians; be it therefore

    Resolved, That the President be requested to relieve inefficient General Halleck of his command, and to court-martial him because of inability and neglect of duty, especially on account of the Corinth affair. Be it further

    3

    Resolved, That the President be asked to grant Generals Fremont, Sigel, Willich, and Butler, who have proved that they are capable and conscientious leaders, independent positions; to relieve all other inefficient and traitorous officers of their commissions; to punish them in accordance with martial law; to prosecute the war with greater vigor; and not to wait until the people tire of the selfish acts of politicians and take the administration of military affairs and the government of the country into their own hands. Be it further

    Resolved, That these resolutions be published in the local German and English newspapers (with the exception of the Chicago Union and the Times) and that a copy of these resolutions be sent to President Abraham Lincoln, and to Generals Fremont, Sigel, Willich, Butler, and Halleck.

    Wilhelm H. Haase, Secretary.

    Last night, at a meeting of German citizens of Chicago's West Side, held at the hall of the Socialer Arbeiterverein of the former Tenth Ward, the following resolutions were adopted: ...

    German
    III B 2, I G, I F 6, I F 5, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 09, 1867
    Yesterday's Primary Election

    Following is the result of the Republican primary election which was held yesterday:

    First Ward: Jacob Beiersdorf, George W. Fritz, Peter Regitz, Nimrod Walz, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] Joshua Knickerbackcer, Alderman; George Hartmann, Constable.

    Second Ward: August Neuhaus, Christian Schell, Johann Schroeder, Karl H. Ham, Delegates; [Translator's note: Eleven other names are omitted.] Arthur Dixon, Alderman; Charles McLane, Constable.

    Third Ward: Joseph Pollock, Karl Rose, Philipp Becker, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] Karl Wicker, Alderman; Sayville Scott, 2Constable.

    Fourth Ward: Conrad Seipp, C. Wahl, Delegates; [Translator's note: Nine other names are omitted.] Sam McCoy, Alderman; W. C. Hendricks, Constable.

    Fifth Ward: William Hausen, Paskal Schneider, Christ Eigenmann, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted. John Raber, Alderman; Peter Murphy, Constable.

    Sixth Ward: William Blanke, William Ruehl, Fred Haertig, Delegates; [Translator's note: Three other names are omitted.] Friedrich Burkhardt, Alderman; A. B. Chladeck, Constable.

    Seventh Ward: Albert Kubeck, Christ Techtmeyer, John Schenk, Delegates; [Translator's note: Six other names are omitted.] John McAllister, Alderman; William Zschokke, Constable.

    3

    Eighth Ward: Fred Maas, N. Schneider, Jacob Link, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] Isaac Wentworth, Alderman; Fred Haucke, Constable.

    Ninth Ward: William Schade, Delegate; [Translator's note: Fourteen other names are omitted.] W. R. Carpenter, Alderman; Cyrus Keeler, Constable.

    Tenth Ward: Andrew Wemple, Otto Dehling, U. Lochbieler, Delegates; [Translator's note: Nine other names are omitted.] Edmund Bixby, Alderman; Joel Lull, Constable.

    Eleventh Ward: Henry Ackhoff, Edward S. Salomon, Charles Muenzer, H. Gade, Delegates; [Translator's note: Seven other names are omitted.] S. J. Russel, Alderman; G. Stirling, Constable.

    Twelfth Ward: August Steinhaus, Fred Yoltz, Henry Schroeder, Clement Hirsch, Louis Schultze, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.]

    4

    O. W. Potter, Alderman; Fred Zschokke, Constable.

    Thirteenth Ward: Conrad Yoltz, Gustave Fischer, K. G. Schmidt, Delegates; [Translator's note: Three other names are omitted.] George T. Beebe, Alderman; Nicholas Dries, Constable.

    Fourteenth Ward: Christian Paesch, Johann Batten, John Laubmann, Henry Schlottinger, John Hettinger, Charles Goebel, A. L. Berger, E. Albert, F. C. Gerbing, Delegates; Philipp Steinmueller, Alderman; Karl Hahn, Constable.

    Fifteenth Ward: Joseph Huhn, Jacob Enders, Peter Memel, Delegates; [Translator's note: Eight other names are omitted.] Fred Buchanan, Alderman; Philip Paul, Constable.

    Sixteenth Ward: George Oertel, Adam Baierle, Fred Metzke, H. Kaufmann, G. A. Busse, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] D. H. Lincoln, Alderman; Christ Gragen, Constable.

    Following is the result of the Republican primary election which was held yesterday: First Ward: Jacob Beiersdorf, George W. Fritz, Peter Regitz, Nimrod Walz, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names ...

    German
    I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 14, 1867
    Captain E. F. C. Klokke (Editorial)

    Captain E. F. C. Klokke, a soldier who served in the old Hecker Regiment (Twenty-fourth Illinois) has agreed to accede to the wishes of his friends and become a candidate for the office of Clerk of the Superior Court.

    Captain Klokke was a brave soldier, according to the unanimous opinion of his comrades in arms and superior officers. He is a loyal Republican, and a sworn enemy of all fanatics and advocates of temperance. He is able and ambitious, respected as a citizen and soldier, and deserves the support of all true Republicans. We heartily recommend him to our voters.

    Captain E. F. C. Klokke, a soldier who served in the old Hecker Regiment (Twenty-fourth Illinois) has agreed to accede to the wishes of his friends and become a candidate ...

    German
    I F 1, I B 1, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 23, 1867
    The Election (Editorial)

    On page eight of this newspaper there is a list of members of the County and the ward Committees which are to manage the coming campaign. It is evident that only experienced Republicans have been chosen, and they may be relied upon to put forth their best efforts in attaining favorable results for the party. The County Campaign Committee will meet every morning to receive reports and announcements from the Ward Committees.

    The outcome of the October elections in Ohio and Pennsylvania has given this year's County election an importance that it would not normally have. Chicago is the citadel of the Liberty party in the Northwest. Our opponents will do everything they possibly can to gain a victory here, so that they may noise it abroad to prove their statement that "the attitude of the 2people has undergone a change. Even a considerable decrease in the Republican majority, or the defeat of one of the Republican candidates would greatly encourage the Democrats and exercise a depressive influence upon the Liberty party in our own state and in the other states of the Northwest."

    We may be confident that the German Republicans of Chicago do not want to see the Republican majority in Cook County diminished by a lukewarm attitude. For unlike their brothers in other states, they have no just reason to be dissatisfied with their English-speaking companions. Not one of the prominent local Republicans of American birth who stand high in the councils of the party is in favor of temperance or the Sunday laws advocated by a few party adherents who will have no influence whatever if the party itself does not split. There is no party strife in regard to the so-called blue laws in Chicago as there is in New York. Moreover, there is complete harmony on all principal issues. And as far as participation by Germans in the 3administration of public offices is concerned, it is probably greater today than at any previous time; it is greater in Chicago than in any other large city of the United States, as is apparent from the many German names that appear on the County, Ward, and Township tickets. It was pointed out recently that with the exception of one person, every German who was nominated at this year's convention was elected.

    It will depend principally upon the efforts and the zeal of the Germans whether or not Chicago, in contrast to other cities, will prove to be an impregnable fortress against the onslaughts of the reactionaries in the November election.

    On page eight of this newspaper there is a list of members of the County and the ward Committees which are to manage the coming campaign. It is evident that ...

    German
    I B 1, I F 5, I F 1, I B 2