The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 21, 1861
    Carl Schurz and the Sardinia Embassy (Editorial)

    The appointment of an ambassador to Turin was of special interest, not because of the character of those who sought this post, but because of the eventual recognition or nonrecognition of the German Republicans of the United States. We admit that we were not favorably impressed when we learned that Mr. [Carl] Schurz had not been selected for the mission. After Governor Koerner had been defrauded of the ambassadorship at Berlin through a political coup of Mr. Judd of Chicago, Mr. Schurz was the only representative German aspirant to a foreign embassy, and he was especially entitled to the promotion, since he not only had the support of his state, as is often the case with American politicians, but also the indorsement of the Germans of every state in the Union. This support undoubtedly was evidence that the Germans of the Union wanted to be acknowledged coequal with native Americans in at least one respect--whenever appointments to 2foreign positions were in question. Their concern with Mr. Schurz was based solely on the German's desire to nominate their worthiest and ablest representative.

    They were not successful in their attempts to wrest such recognition from the national pride of native Americans; and an appointment to Rio de Janeiro can never be looked upon as adequate compensation.

    Secretary of State Seward even went so far as to establish a principle according to which all foreign-born persons will be excluded from the foreign service--if such a thing is possible. We deplore the narrow-mindedness from which this principle emanated.

    In the first place, we must not overlook the fact that foreign-born citizens who know a foreign language are best qualified to represent the United States abroad. The New York Tribune was right when it stated, in defense of Mr. Schurz's claim, that his Prussian extraction was an argument for, and not 3against, his appointment to the Court of Turin. Italy, which was liberated through the revolution brought about by the revolutionist Garibaldi, would have no scruples about recognizing the former German revolutionist, especially since he would not be serving in that capacity, but rather as an American citizen. However, we shall not enumerate the excuses which Washington offered for denying the request of Mr. Schurz, the German-American citizen par excellence. It would be useless to discuss them anyway: but the lesson which this German reversal teaches is very instructive.

    We learn from it that even the greatest services rendered by an eminent German to a political party and, in this case, to the Union itself, are not sufficient to offset the influence of American narrow-mindedness and greed for office. The battle of the Germans for recognition of their co-equality with native Americans in the Union is by no means ended, and they have no other recourse but to apply means which are more effective than either the influence of individuals, be they ever so prominent, or the 4resolutions of the Central Committee of the Republican party.

    The coequality of the Germans must be explained to the masses in city, county, and state until even the most stubborn are convinced and the feeble-minded can understand--before any attempt is made to enlighten the upper classes. Thus, it is necessary that German sheriffs be elected, and that, if possible, a German representative and German senator be seated in every state legislature in the United States, and the next step of the Germans, especially those in the northwest, should be to bring about the election of German congressmen.

    It is said that New England congressmen prevented the appointment of Mr. Schurz; and it will be the duty of the Germans to erase this score by electing German congressional representatives. In days gone by the Germans were not competent to fill public offices, but this inefficiency is being remedied in some quarters, at least to some extent, and in a short time there will be no dearth of qualified German candidates. The old adage, 5"Who does not progress must retrogress" is true close of German-Americans.

    The knowledge that their native culture was a predominant element in the progressive development of the American nation must be an incentive to the Germans of the Union to continue their collaborative efforts in shaping the social, political, and economic affairs of this nation; and, to that end they must aspire to the higher, even the highest, public offices. This must be the aim of all German-Americans for the sake of those native Americans who instinctively fear and try to avert any interference in their turbulent national matters by inexperienced elements.

    The appointment of an ambassador to Turin was of special interest, not because of the character of those who sought this post, but because of the eventual recognition or nonrecognition ...

    German
    I F 4, IV, I J, I F 5, I F 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 31, 1861
    A German on the Independent People's Ticket (Editorial)

    Judge Eustace rejected the nomination of a delegate to the Constitutional Convention because the man was not eligible. The nomination was then offered to Caspar Butz. When he declined the honor, Mr. John Henry Muehlke was nominated. Neither Mr. Muehlke nor Mr. Butz, sought the nomination, but were requested to serve their German fellow citizens in the very important Constitutional Convention; and we sincerely hope that Mr. Muehlke will accept the responsibility. There can be no doubt that a German should be a member of this Convention in which a constitution is to be drawn up for the purpose of protecting the rights of not only the Germans, but of all citizens by adoption, when their civil or political interests are at issue, or to preserve the interests of the laboring classes and the businessmen when proposals regarding the all important bank-question are made.

    2

    Mr. Muehlke is not a politician, but an able business-man, and we are convinced that the interests of our German populace may be confidentially placed in his hands. We have often heard that the people do not want to have anything to do with politicians, and we are happy to note that the men who propose nominations chose a business-man. In accepting an office which he did not ask for but which was offered to him, Mr. Muehlke will prove that Germans are not as much bent on obtaining offices, as on preserving their rights and that there are business-men among them who are willing to sacrifice time and money, when the interests of their countrymen demand it.

    Judge Eustace rejected the nomination of a delegate to the Constitutional Convention because the man was not eligible. The nomination was then offered to Caspar Butz. When he declined the ...

    German
    I F 3, I F 4, I F 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 18, 1862
    The Reply of Mr. Butz

    "Chicago, Illinois,

    "September 16, 1862.

    "Mr. A. C. Hesing et al.: The request of so many respected citizens of this city that I become a candidate for Representative at large from the State of Illinois is certainly worthy of my most careful consideration. I also think that at a time when German arms are doing so much to save this country, the advice of a German ought to be heard in our national assembly. That one of the fourteen Representatives from our State be a German is not asking too much, especially since the Germans have done a great deal for the progress and growth of Illinois.

    "However, it does not follow that I have any special claim to the right to represent the Germans. No doubt, there are many other men of German extraction in our beloved State, who have more ability and experience in affairs of state 2than I have. I cannot judge whether or not the Germans consider me qualified to serve their interests in the political arena.

    "Of course, if the State Convention acknowledges the just claim of the Germans, and should the German delegates choose me, I would consider it my duty, albeit a difficult one, to enter the campaign as the candidate of the Germans. In case I am elected, I will have to resign my position in the Superior Court and devote all my time and energy to my new office and its great responsibilites.

    "Hitherto, such close harmony has existed between the Germans and the progressive Americans in Illinois that the first man recommended as a candidate by a German delegate has been nominated for the office in question. I do not seek this office, yet I have no reason to refuse it if the Germans are successful in their efforts to nominate me.

    "I have frequently voiced my political principles, so that I am sure that they are known to you. With reference to the war against the southern Rebels, 3I have but one principle: 'Use every legitimate means to destroy them!'

    "Caspar Butz."

    "Chicago, Illinois, "September 16, 1862. "Mr. A. C. Hesing et al.: The request of so many respected citizens of this city that I become a candidate for Representative at large ...

    German
    I F 4, IV, I G, I F 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 18, 1862
    The Candidacy of Caspar Butz (Editorial)

    We have called the attention of the Germans of the State to the fact that they now have a very good opportunity to send a German Representative to the United States Congress. The citizens of the State of Illinois are entitled to elect a fourteenth Representative, a Representative at large, besides the regular Representatives of the thirteen districts.

    The Germans of Illinois constitute an important part of the population of the State, and nobody could justly accuse them of being immodest if they ask that one of the fourteen men chosen to represent the people of Illinois in Congress be a German.

    The German citizens of this State, as well as those of the other states of the Union, have always been known as staunch advocates and defenders of 2liberty, and it was due chiefly to their willing co-operation and strong support that the standard-bearer of the Chicago Platform was elected President of the United States. In the present war for freedom they not only have proved that they are loyal patriots and brave soldiers, but they have also provided a number of military leaders who have won the admiration of the whole country.

    Far be it from us to demand that Germans in general, or any individual German, should receive a reward for the deeds of our German heroes; we shall merely say that a people who, collectively and individually, have done so much for the cause of this country should also have a voice in the national assembly of the nation, aspecially when they have in their ranks men who are capable of representing the people as a whole.

    Had Mr. Gustav Koerner not left recently for the court of the King of Spain to serve as ambassador of our country, the Germans of the State certainly 3would not have missed the opportunity of doing everything possible to elect this man to Congress, since he has brought honor upon the German name by his record as judge of the Supreme Court and also as lieutenant governor. However, since Mr. Gustav Koerner, the man of our choice, is abroad in the service of our country, we heartily recommend Mr. Caspar Butz. We know of no other German in the State of Illinois who is better qualified to represent the State in the Congress, and many German citizens have urged him to be a candidate.

    As Representative to the State Legislature from the northern and western District of Cook County, Mr. Butz has often demonstrated that he is an able parliamentarian, and he has proved that the interests of his constituents have been entrusted to a faithful and honest man. Mr. Butz is a very good speaker; he is a master of the English language. He has the necessary knowledge of statesmanship, and he is a zealous advocate and champion of absolute freedom. Being a liberal-minded man, Mr. Butz would be in favor of prosecuting the war more vigorously, and, in general he would recommend only 4such measures by which the Rebellion would be suppressed now and for all time.

    If the Germans want a German Representative in Congress, and if they have chosen Mr. Butz as their candidate, they will have to make their wishes known in unmistakable terms at the mass meeting which will be held next Monday.

    We have called the attention of the Germans of the State to the fact that they now have a very good opportunity to send a German Representative to the United ...

    German
    I F 1, IV, I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 15, 1864
    Republican Candidates for Alderman (Editorial)

    Never before have the Republican citizens of the city of Chicago nominated better aldermanic candidates than those whose names appear above this article. Most of the candidates who were nominated in the recent primaries are widely known as patriotic, honest, and able men. Among the eighteen aspirants there are five Germans, to whom their countrymen may justly point with great pride, and who will undoubtedly do their full duty if elected.

    Peter Shimp has been a member of the City Council for two years. Originally he was not elected as a party man, both parties the Republican as well as the Democratic, having voted for Shimp, who at that time was a Douglas Democrat. When the Copperheads came into control of the city administration, they believed that Peter Shimp could be "persuaded" by the party whip to vote for their 2measures; but Mr. Shimp was too good a patriot and Union man to betray his country. He abided faithfully by the last statement which Stephen A. Douglas made: "Now (during the war) there can be only traitors and patriots"; and Peter Shimp turned his back upon the former and took his rightful place among the latter.

    John Raber is known to the Republicans of Chicago as an old and faithful friend of the Union and of the cause of liberty. He served the city as collector for two years, and his final accounting proved that in him the Germans had furnished an official who administered the financial affairs of the city conscientiously and ably. He will perform the duties of an alderman equally well.

    Anton Hottinger has served the people of his ward as alderman since the last municipal election. Had Mr. Hottinger been a member of the party that had a majority in the City Council, or, rather, had Mr. Hottinger's party been in the majority, he would have succeeded in doing much good for the city and for 3his ward, for there is hardly a Republican alderman in the City Council who is more respected and has more influence than Mr. Hottinger. We hope that during his next term he will have the pleasure and opportunity of fighting on the side of a Republican majority.

    Gustav Fischer was elected to the Board of Supervisors last fall, and the fact that he was nominated without opposition is proof that the citizens of the Thirteenth Ward are entirely satisfied with his services. Mr. Fischer has been a Deputy Sheriff for a long time, and likewise in this office he has proved to be an able, reliable, and willing servant, thus winning the respect of his fellow citizens.

    C. B. Lindemann is not known to the voters, since he has not yet held public office. We cannot, therefore, cite his public record to prove that he is able and trustworthy. However, we have known Mr. Lindemann well for a long time, and can predict that he will be an excellent alderman; in fact, we congratulate the Republican party upon its choice of a candidate. Mr. Lindemann has always 4been identified with the great party of liberty and has been active in the promulgation of its principles. He deserves the honor which has been bestowed upon him and should be given a seat among the City Fathers. We are confident that the citizens who nominated him will do everything in their power to elect him by a great majority.

    The Sixteenth Ward is a ward in which it will require great effort to elect a Republican; however, nothing but this effort is required, and the victory will be won if our citizens do their duty. We refer all those who have any doubts on this score to the results of last fall, when the Republicans in the Sixteenth Ward succeeded in electing Charles Drandorff to the Board of Supervisors. What was possible then, is not only possible again, but can be accomplished with much less difficulty, since a great many people who voted the Democratic ticket at that time have left the Democratic party, because it is controlled by the Chicago Times. So let us take courage and work diligently, and C. B. Lindemann will represent the Sixteenth Ward in the City Council.

    Christian Techtmeier won the nomination in the Seventh Ward. He is one of 5the oldest settlers of Chicago, a man of the people, a worker in the true sense of the word. We are happy that the voters of the Seventh Ward have shown by their choice of a candidate that they want to be represented only by men who have the welfare of the country and their community at heart. The fact that Mr. Techtmeier enjoys the respect of his neighbors, and of the residents of his ward in general, is a strong indication that he will be elected.

    Never before have the Republican citizens of the city of Chicago nominated better aldermanic candidates than those whose names appear above this article. Most of the candidates who were nominated ...

    German
    I F 1, IV, I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 26, 1864
    Meeting of the Coty Council

    A regular meeting of the City Council was held last night. The mayor and the following aldermen were present: Hahn, Schall, Shimp, Roberts, Barrett, Gallup, Kann, Sheridan, Walsh, McDonald, Comisky, Ulbrich, Clark, Himrod, Holden, Von Hollen, Bond, Garfield, Castleman, Armstrong, Ruh, Hottinger, Sullivan, Shufeldt, and Woodman.

    A regular meeting of the City Council was held last night. The mayor and the following aldermen were present: Hahn, Schall, Shimp, Roberts, Barrett, Gallup, Kann, Sheridan, Walsh, McDonald, Comisky, ...

    German
    I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 09, 1867
    Yesterday's Primary Election

    Following is the result of the Republican primary election which was held yesterday:

    First Ward: Jacob Beiersdorf, George W. Fritz, Peter Regitz, Nimrod Walz, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] Joshua Knickerbocker, Alderman; George Hartmann, Constable.

    Second Ward: August Neuhaus, Christian Schell, Johann Schroeder, Karl H. Ham, Delegates; [Translator's note: Eleven other names are omitted.] Arthur Dixon, Alderman; Charles McLane, Constable.

    Third Ward: Joseph Pollock, Karl Rose, Philipp Becker, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] Karl Wicker, Alderman; Sayville Scott, Constable.

    2

    Fourth Ward: Conrad Seipp, C. Wahl, Delegates; [Translator's note: Nine other names are omitted.] Sam McCoy, Alderman; W. C. Hendricks, Constable.

    Fifth Ward: William Hausen, Paskal Schneider, Christ Eigenmann, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] John Raber, Alderman; Peter Murphy, Constable.

    Sixth Ward: William Blanke, William Ruehl, Fred Haertig, Delegates; [Translator's note: Three other names are omitted.] Friedrich Burkhardt, Alderman; A. B. Chladeck, Constable.

    Seventh Ward: Albert Kubeck, Christ Techtmeyer, John Schenk, Delegates; [Translator's note: Six other names are omitted.] John McAllister, Alderman; William Zschokke, Constable.

    Eighth Ward: Fred Maas, N. Schneider, Jacob Link, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] Isaac Wentworth, Alderman; Fred Haucke, Constable.

    3

    Ninth Ward: William Schade, Delegate; [Translator's note: Fourteen other names are omitted.] W. R. Carpenter, Alderman; Cyrus Keeler, Constable.

    Tenth Ward: Andrew Wemple, Otto Dehling, U. Lochbieler, Delegates; [Translator's note: Nine other names are omitted.] Edmund Bixby, Alderman; Joel Lull, Constable.

    Eleventh Ward: Henry Ackhoff, Edward S. Salomon, Charles Muenzer, H. Gade, Delegates; [Translator's note: Seven other names are omitted.] S. J. Russel, Alderman; G. Stirling, Constable.

    Twelfth Ward: August Steinhaus, Fred Yoltz, Henry Schroeder, Clement Hirsch, Louis Schultze, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] O. W. Potter, Alderman; Fred Zschokke, Constable.

    Thirteenth Ward: Conrad Voltz, Gustave Fischer, K. G. Schmidt, Delegates; [Translator's note: Three other names are omitted.] George J. Beebe, Alderman; 4Nicholas Dries, Constable.

    Fourteenth Ward: Christian Paesch, Johann Batten, John Laubmann, Henry Schlottinger, John Hettinger, Charles Goebel, A. L. Berger, E. Albert, F. C. Gerbing, Delegates; Philipp Steinmueller, Alderman; Karl Hahn, Constable.

    Fifteenth Ward: Joseph Huhn, Jacob Enders, Peter Memel, Delegates; [Translator's note: Eight other names are omitted.] Fred Buchanan, Alderman; Philip Paul, Constable.

    Sixteenth Ward: George Oertel, Adam Baierle, Fred Metzke, H. Kaufmann, G. A. Busse, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] D. H. Lincoln, Alderman; Christ Gragen, Constable.

    Following is the result of the Republican primary election which was held yesterday: First Ward: Jacob Beiersdorf, George W. Fritz, Peter Regitz, Nimrod Walz, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names ...

    German
    I F 4, I F 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 13, 1867
    Republicans Appoint Ward Committees

    The Republican City Central Committee and the Republican candidates for city offices met yesterday at 11 A. M. in the office of the city clerk. The headquarters of the Republican Campaign Committee has been transferred to 84 Randolph Street.

    The following Republican ward committees were appointed: [Translator's note: In the following list, non-German names are omitted in translation.]

    First Ward: Peter Regitz, Isaac Pflaum, [and five others].

    Second Ward: Philipp Becker, Henry Schroeder, [and three others].

    Third Ward: August Neuhaus, W. W. Schmidt, [and three others].

    Fourth Ward: Otto Bluhm, [and five others].

    Fifth Ward: Michal Schmitz, Christ Eigenmann, Rudolph Kemmler, [and three others].

    Sixth Ward: A. Engelbacher, A. B. Chladeck, William Ruehl, [and three others].

    Seventh Ward: D. Kluetsch, C. Klose, [and three others].

    The Republican City Central Committee and the Republican candidates for city offices met yesterday at 11 A. M. in the office of the city clerk. The headquarters of the Republican ...

    German
    I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 23, 1867
    Bulletin from Republican Headquarters

    The Republican headquarters at 76 La Salle Street announces that the several candidates met and appointed members to various campaign committees. Committees were set up in each of Chicago's fifteen wards. [Names of Germans who were appointed to each ward committee are omitted in translation.] The County Campaign Committee meets at the headquarters every day after ten o'clock. The local committees are asked to confer with the County Committee as often as is necessary.

    A. C. Hesing, Chairman,

    H. S. Taylor, Secretary.

    The Republican headquarters at 76 La Salle Street announces that the several candidates met and appointed members to various campaign committees. Committees were set up in each of Chicago's fifteen ...

    German
    I F 2, I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 28, 1868
    Democratic County Convention

    Yesterday the following were elected delegates to the Democratic county convention, which will meet tomorrow in the office of the county recorder:

    First Ward

    Judge Fuller, Philipp Conley, Ira Foote. [Translator's note: The names of four more men are listed.]

    Second Ward

    Joseph Schlossmann, Fritz Buchspies, Samuel Fleischmann. [Translator's note: The names of five more men are listed.]

    Third Ward

    H. A. Kohn, Peter Hies, H. G. Mueller. [Translator's note: The names of five 2more men are listed.]

    Fourth Ward

    Francis G. Sherman, George W. Morris, A. P. Sharp.

    Fifth Ward

    Henry Scheffler, James Ives, James Mulloy. [Translator's note: The names of six more men are listed.]

    Sixth Ward

    No report.

    Seventh Ward

    G. Schaaf, John Reiser, Edward Powell. [Translator's note: The names of seven 3more men are listed.]

    Eighth Ward

    No report.

    Ninth Ward

    C. F. Colby, John W. Connett, Hugh Maher, S. F. Runyon.

    Tenth Ward

    Joseph Haas, A. H. Buck, Dr. Georg P. Frust. [Translator's note: The names of three more men are listed.]

    Eleventh Ward

    George Hochmeier, D. D. Klein, Jacob Clein. [Translator's note: The names of 4three more men are listed.]

    Twelfth Ward

    No report.

    Thirteenth Ward

    Theodore Weiler, Clement Gies, Peter Brachtendorf. [Translator's note: The names of four more men are listed.]

    Fourteenth Ward

    F. A. Winkelmann, H. F. Wehrfeiler, W. Marringer. [Translator's note: The names of five more men are listed.]

    Fifteenth Ward

    A. S. Weckler, Joseph Kraemer, M. S. Stenger, G. Rammelmeyer. [Translator's 5note: The names of seven more men are listed.]

    Sixteenth Ward

    J. Rosenthal, G. Deutcher, M. S. Webber, J. A. Weinberg. [Translator's note: The names of seven more men are listed.]

    Yesterday the following were elected delegates to the Democratic county convention, which will meet tomorrow in the office of the county recorder: First Ward Judge Fuller, Philipp Conley, Ira Foote. ...

    German
    I F 4