The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svornost -- July 18, 1892
    National Hall Meeting

    Bohemian Workers in protest against "Pinkertons' Bohemian Workers Educational Club" called a mass meeting yesterday afternoon, in "National Hall", for the purpose of protesting the use of "Pinkerton Murderers" against the workingman of Homestead, Pa., and at the same time to offer their warmest sympathies for the locked out steel mill workers of Pennsylvania.

    Is it justice, when a capitalist is allowed to defend his supposed interests with the aid of a gun, while a worker is denied the right to even raise his voice in protest, lest he be labeled an anarchist, or villain, of the biggest sort? Is that any kind of freedom, when every rich cut-throat can have us shot whenever he takes a notion to do so?

    Resolved, that we Bohemian Workingmen gathered here in National Hall in Chicago, protest in the name of all Bohemian Workers of Chicago against the legality of the hiring of murderers by the capitalist, for use against their workingmen, whenever they see fit. Further, we protest 2against the support of the capitalist by the Government of Pennsylvania. The laboring men there are being oppressed and driven to deeds of desperation in order that the workers may be accused of all unrest. Finally, it is resolved to express our full sympathy with the strikers, and to encourage further opposition against the superior force of capitalist, who are making every effort to destroy all trade unions and to secure the ruling power.

    We condemn all such forms of procedure, and call on all organized labor in America to raise its voice in behalf of the oppressed workers of Homestead, Pa.

    This resolution was unanimously adopted and the meeting was then adjourned.

    Bohemian Workers in protest against "Pinkertons' Bohemian Workers Educational Club" called a mass meeting yesterday afternoon, in "National Hall", for the purpose of protesting the use of "Pinkerton Murderers" against ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4, I D 1 a, I D 2 a 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 08, 1892
    New Polish Society

    At a meeting of Polish printers, held yesterday in the building of the Polish Publishing Company, 141 W. Division Street, a new society--the Polish Printers' Association of J. I. Kraszewski--was at last organized with twenty-two members. For the administration of the Society the following were elected: J. Olbinski, director; J. I. Migdalski, assistant director; W. Maychrzycki, secretary; A. Kaletta, assistant secretary; and L. Szopinski, treasurer. The association resolved to incorporate.

    In order to facilitate the registration of those who did not attend last night's meeting, it was decided to retain the present fee of one dollar until the next meeting, September 6. Thereafter, the fee shall be two dollars.

    Those desiring to join the association may apply at the address given below, or wait until the next meeting.

    By order of the Administration,

    W. Maychrzycki, secretary.

    141 W. Division Street.

    At a meeting of Polish printers, held yesterday in the building of the Polish Publishing Company, 141 W. Division Street, a new society--the Polish Printers' Association of J. I. Kraszewski--was ...

    Polish
    II D 1, IV, I D 2 a 1
  • Svornost -- March 22, 1900
    Local Notices. Standpoint of an Editor. Editorial.

    From the time when in Chicago cheap Bohemian newspapers appeared with cheaper contents, there was exerted a pressure on our publication, Svornost, with the demand to lower our prices. This would be impossible, should Svornost remain for the future a newspaper with carefully prepared contents, as it has until today. In the meantime while other cheap publications were filled with insignificant reprints, our readers always found in the columns of Svornost, contemporary, carefully selected information about our overworked people, the newest correspondence from our staff members from almost all parts of the United States. The decent publication of this kind of newspaper, with other necessary expenses, made the expenditure so great that the editor was absolutely unable to lower the prices. The other publications, not having such high expenses, were not able to stand the competition any other way than by being cheap. In the last few years the Svornost has almost doubled in publication and when it was more and more voiced by our enlightened workingmen that they would subscribe willingly to Svornost in preference to other pseudo-workingmen's news, were they able to pay the same price, the administration conforming with the public desire, decided to lower the price.

    2

    Starting the coming Sunday, March 25, Svornost will cost ten cents per week and its contents will not be of less value or less carefully chosen. Willing to give to the readers, always, the latest news and information and the best articles and editorials, the management of the Svornost governed themselves by the example of principal English newspapers and German workingmen's news, such as the Arbeiter Zeitung; we installed, at great expense, electrically propelled new linotypes and presses which will help extensively to lower the price of our publication.

    Lately the publication Denni Hlasatel which is a member of a pseudo-union, started a secret and even a public fight against Syornost for not belonging to the union. We like to explain correctly the relations of Bohemian publications with the Typographical Union. The Svornost has nothing against the union and if somebody really is a friend of workingmen, that is the editor of Svornost, Mr. August Geringer, and believe me his start in the newspaper business was much harder than of any one of those fops on Ashland avenue and 18th street, who try to be the Messiahs of Bohemian typesetters for the Bohemian workingmen.

    3

    The editor of Svornost has nothing against his employees belonging to the union, but if they are not able to become members of the union - the cause of it is again Hlasatel. We have proved already to the Bohemian citizens that there is no doubt that Hlasatel is in no way a cooperative nor a regular stock-company employing the stockholders. It is simply a case of the bosses and employers of Hlasatel being at the same time the bosses in the union of Bohemian printers where all rascals are against Svornost. Nobody has heard as yet of a union where the employers were workingmen at the same time. So long as the employers and bosses of Hlasatel can be the members of the Bohemian Printers' Union, this kind of a union can never be regarded as an honest and solid workingmen's union body.

    From the moment of resignation of all bosses and stockholders of the incorporated firm, Denni Hlasatel, from the union, this union will start to be an honorable workingmen's union.

    When Svornost installed the new linotypes and setting machinery, the personnel of Hlasatel started to gossip the news that, at least, half of our typesetters must be laid off, but nothing like that has happened and none of the setters 4was dismissed. On the contrary, the editor of Svornost, a man always sympathizing with the workingmen, divided the setting personnel in two parts and gave to everyone an eight-hour a day job. In this regard our workingmen have a real advantage over the union workingmen of Hlasatel, National Press, and other printing shops where union conditions exist on paper only, and where a union man, to get along, must work hard and long into the night to obtain the exceptional pay as determined by the union. Where it happens in a union printing shop that the bosses are union members too, nobody has control of it and it is easily silenced.

    Should Mr. Geringer have union workingmen and abuse them the same way as Hlasatel or National Press, all the Bohemian citizens aroused by the union and its bosses would rise against him.

    The typesetters of Svornost are working a straight eight-hour day and their weekly payroll is absolutely higher than if they would be paid according to the union rates.

    5

    The best proof of this was when, not long ago, our manager appointed two union typesetters to help us out and gave them a salary conforming with the union scale. Neither of them, even working hard, was able to earn as much as the average wages of our typesetters. And it is a public secret that none of the so-called Bohemian Union printing shops is paying according to union scales, which are only on paper for publicity. These two boys are the best witnesses of the conditions which rule Svornost. They have assured our management that they will work willingly each time, should we need help; they stated further, that the Svornost printing shop is the best and most perfect of all they have worked in and that everything gossiped by the stock-holders about Mr. Geringer and his staff of co-workers is untrue and an un-founded lie. We must add that the said two typesetters were not any irresponsible boys but experienced workers.

    We are in doubt if the Bohemian Printers' Union could offer better working conditions than Svornost does, giving to its workers an eight-hour day and bigger wages than the union scale offers. In spite of this our workingmen are willing to join the union the moment the rich stockholders and proprietors of Hlasatel will resign as illegitimate members.

    6

    The purchase of the machinery by Svornost is of a big advantage to our workingmen and our present and future patrons because our typesetters get a shorter day of work, the same good wages and our patrons a cheaper newspaper.

    We hope that the Bohemian citizens will acknowledge our position and appreciate our efforts for the benefit of the reading public and for the purpose of justice in working conditions in the Bohemian printing shops.

    The editor of Svornost was not the cause of our not wanting to join the union, but the real cause was the deceit of the stockholders of Denni Hlasatel, their bosses and pseudo-union-men. All the time, during this union fight against our paper, nobody else tried to rouse the prejudice and mistrust among the educated and intelligent people toward our paper, but only Hlasatel with the help of its stockholders and employers.

    We are asking our patrons to take everything previously said into consideration and remember that this newspaper will cost in the future ten cents only, and their desires will be fulfilled, then you will have a long-expected, widely read, excellent, and cheap Bohemian newspaper in the United States, for a 7smaller prices than any insignificant paper filled with unworthy reprints from old country papers, and representing different political humbugs.

    From the time when in Chicago cheap Bohemian newspapers appeared with cheaper contents, there was exerted a pressure on our publication, Svornost, with the demand to lower our prices. This ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 1, IV, I C, I D 2 a 2, I D 2 a 1
  • Reform Advocate -- March 07, 1903
    (No headline)

    Dr. Hirsch acted as arbitrator, and his findings settled the differences between the Firemen's Union and the Building Manager's Association. In a second arbitration, Dr. Hirsch settled the dispute between the Stationary Engineer's Union and the Building Manager's Association.

    The Doctor is now sitting with Judge Sears and Prentiss as a Board of Arbitration convened to consider the differences between the Chicago City Railway Co. and its employees.

    Dr. Hirsch acted as arbitrator, and his findings settled the differences between the Firemen's Union and the Building Manager's Association. In a second arbitration, Dr. Hirsch settled the dispute between ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 1, IV, I D 2 a 2
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- July 31, 1906
    Letter or Spirit of the Rule--Which?

    Our Chicago streetcar motorman is forbidden to speak to passengers. Motorman E. J. Johnson, an employee of the South Side Streetcar Company, has learned that the letter rules in preference to the spirit of the rule; evidently as far as a Swede is concerned.

    Last week he was called on the carpet by Superintendent Folds, who secretly rebuked Johnson for daring to speak to a lady while he was running the car. Folds expected Johnson to humble himself, asking that his mistake be overlooked.

    Johnson refused to eat crow as the lady he talked to was his wife, to whom he claims that he has the privilege of speaking whether he is working or not. This attitude aroused the ire of the man with a little authority and he 2discharged Johnson in spite of the fact that the latter held a faultless record during the six years he had worked for the company. Other authorities will take up the Johnson case, forcing his reinstatement.

    Our Chicago streetcar motorman is forbidden to speak to passengers. Motorman E. J. Johnson, an employee of the South Side Streetcar Company, has learned that the letter rules in preference ...

    Swedish
    I D 2 a 1, I C
  • Jewish Labor World -- February 26, 1909
    United Hebrew Trades

    The United Hebrew Trades have reorganized. Hereafter, only trade unions will compose the organization, and only such workers will be accepted as delegates as are able to accomplish something for the Federation.

    If the reorganization will do good to the workers we are perfectly satisfied.

    When the Federation was reorganized we didn't have many unions, and if unions existed they were unknown to the workers. The first ones to affiliate with the Federation were a few small Jewish unions, the workmen's Circle branches, and Socialists, then the cap-makers, bakers, and garment workers joined, and within a short period there was a good deal of life put into the labor movement.

    Times were good, new organizations were born at the same time, many more progressive organizations paid monthly to help keep up an organizer. A strike of the bakers, attracted all the active Socialists and trade unionists. A vigorous agitation in favor of the union label was carried on, and within a short period it created a great demand for the label, 2which was already pretty well spread. The meetings of the Federation became larger, the actors union then joined the Federation. They also had a strike that drew a few months of activity from the Federation.

    At that time the United Hebrew Trades had every indication of becoming a power for good, but the depression set in and a reaction occured in the Jewish movement. It was because of the differences in opinions among the delegates which was responsible, for their failure to do the required work, but the unions themselves turned weak and their members were left without work. The unions gradually disbanded. The progressive societies turned weak and all this effected the United Hebrew Trades.

    The press committee puts the entire blame on the divergence in opinion of the progressive delegates; this is wrong. It is possible that some of the delegates would like to introduce certain radical principles into the Jewish labor movement. They have a right to do so because the fundamental principles of the United Hebrew Trades is purely Socialistic. The delegate of the garment workers, in spite of the fact that he is not an outspoken radical, personally helped in the writing of the principle statements, together with the delegated of the cap-makers union, Brother 3Schreiber, and a few other delegates. At a previous meeting it had been determined to stand by the Socialist principles, also to draw all the progressive Societies into the United Hebrew Trades.

    It is not true, as the press committee states, that the Jewish labor unions are not quite ready to go hand in hand with the radicals. Among all the Jewish unions one will find a strong radicalism. The cap -makers union has, in their fundamental principles, recognized socialism, the bakers 'union recognize socialism and these strong unions stand one hundred per cent with the United Hebrew Trades.

    The only union not recognizing socialist principles is the garment workers and when this union was investigated, it was found that instead of doing good, it was just the contrary, that it did a great deal of harm to the union by being conservative and following the program of all the American conservative unions.

    Let this reorganization of the United Hebrew Trades serve as the start of a new life in the trade unions and among the progressive elements.

    The United Hebrew Trades have reorganized. Hereafter, only trade unions will compose the organization, and only such workers will be accepted as delegates as are able to accomplish something for ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 1, I E
  • Narod Polski -- January 04, 1911
    Professional and Labor Organizations

    America stands at the head of the list as to the labor and trade organizations. Anything we have depends on organization. We have gigantic and very powerful organizations composed of manufacturers and bankers, besides these there are many professional and labor organizations. To the latter belong also the Poles, but alas! their number is so small that it appears as zero in comparison with other nationalities.

    Our working people who are unwilling to become citizens are also keeping away from these organizations with unpardonable negligence.

    Our working man is not willing to and cannot understand that the purpose of those organizations is to help their members materially in case of unemployment, sickness or any other misfortune; also to help them in their struggle for better existence, in other words, bigger wages.

    2

    It grieves some people to pay excessive initiation fees and high monthly dues; others intend to return to their native country as soon as they accumulate a certain sum of money, taking for granted that joining such organizations would not benefit them.

    That sinful negligence revenges itself upon them terribly, especially in case of a strike or any misfortune.

    Whoever observed carefully and investigated cases of accidents must have come to the conclusion that of all the victims hit by misfortunes the Poles received least support and help.

    That happen because our people, lacking the knowledge of the native language, do not know how to demand their rights; secondly because not being members of any professional or labor organization, they do not get sympathy as do the members of those organizations.

    3

    During the last big strike of the tailors in Chicago, Polish families suffered the most. The majority of tailors and girls working in tailor shops were not members of the union, so that during the strike they had to live on their savings and it was not until their funds gave out that they did apply for a membership card in order to receive support from the donations contributed for the strikers.

    Our people were also the first strike breakers, and it was necessary for the police to escort them to their shops.

    Very sad, in our opinion, were the street demonstrations and parades formed in our settlements. Throngs of our unfortunate Polish men and women, partly new union members, paraded under the leadership of a handful of Jews led by a Jew and carrying Jewish signs and inscriptions through the streets. It made the impression that the whole parade was made up of Jews.

    4

    That strike, though not ended, will end very soon because those who caused the strike are returning to work secretly. Again our people will suffer the most because many of them will not be taken back to work and even if they were no one will recompense them for their lost wages.

    At present the strikes cannot be a success for the strikers cannot compete with organized capital.

    In a misfortune every little help is welcome and in order to be prepared we should save during good times, but our people do not think about it. The result is that when the strike breaks out they suffer. Most of the blood is shed during Polish strikes. The result is that it creates hatred for the so called foreigners, as we are called.

    America stands at the head of the list as to the labor and trade organizations. Anything we have depends on organization. We have gigantic and very powerful organizations composed of ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 1, I C, I B 3 c, I D 2 a 4, I D 2 a 3, I D 2 a 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 12, 1911
    A Fitting Reply to the Clumsy Attacks of the Typograph against the Bohemian Printing Trades Central Union

    Recently, we published in this paper a communication in which we portrayed in the proper light the attacks of the International Typographical Union No. 330 directed against our union, and at the same time we called attention to the unprincipled actions of the said International Typographical Union.

    In the latest issue of the Typograph, the masters are replying to us, but in such a manner as is not customary among decent people. Or are such expressions used among decent people as: "scamp," "driveling," "toad," and others, which cannot be published here? We expected a real argument, but experienced only insults. We made known a whole list of true examples of the rottenness of that union, and instead of answering us fittingly, they haughtily and snobbishly say that they 2will not go to scabs for advice. They lie, and try to squirm out, but at the same time, in their reply to Spravedlnost, convict themselves of lying.

    For the sake of interest and judgment, as to whether or not we were right when we wrote about "union" conditions in print-shops coming under the jurisdiction of the International Typographical Union No. 330, we bring the following for consideration: Although Typograph in past issues called attention to the ugly conditions existing in the shop of Spravedlnost about which the secretary of the Allied Printing Trades Council, Mr. Straub, said that they are worse than scabs, that organ in its last issue states that it pictured those incidents in a manner almost too mild. Suppose then, if Typograph were to tell the whole truth, then some pretty deeds would be brought into the open. Typograph also accuses Spravedlnost of deceiving the public when it says that the printing plant and Spravedlnost are 3undertakings of all progressive organized Bohemian labor. The International Typographical Union, with which Spravedlnost has an agreement, and which is certainly aware of the conditions existing in the shop of Spravedlnost, declares the claim of Spravedlnost is utterly false, and that the print-shop and Spravedlnost are really the joint enterprise of the Bohemian socialist section, which is still a long way from being the representative of all progressive organized labor.

    Further, Typograph points out that Spravedlnost is not sure that the printing label will not be taken away from it, because the minutes of the International Typographical Union are full of notations about the violation of union regulations by Spravedlnost. Also a member of the International Union, Mr. Mejdrich, admits that he once struck the former president of the Board of Directors of Spravedlnost, when that gentleman accused the typesetters of robbing the shop, and throwing away good type which was not worn out. A fine example of brotherly workingmen's action, 4is it not?

    Also, it appears from these accusations that the full manifestation by the Central Unity of Bohemian Unions was misused so that the associates could draw commissions for themselves. Typesetters working for Spravedlnost do not receive the wage set up by the Union. They work longer hours than the Union permits and that for scab wages. In addition to this, the workers are compelled to contribute to the so called "workingmen's" newspaper, Spravedlnost.

    Well then, gentlemen, why do you become excited when your inconsistency is admitted by yourselves? Or do you suppose that when you write "that it is not possible for you to disprove the mass of lies and slander," the whole matter will be settled? You are very much in error when you say that the Bohemian Printing Trades Central Union was founded at the request of the employers. To that we reply: The Bohemian Printing 5Trades Central Union was founded through necessity, so as to resist the often nonsensical orders and fancies of various self-styled saviors of workingmen, whom Haywood so excellently characterized in his lectures.

    Bohemian workingmen are, and always will be, so mature that they know what they should do, without the necessity of having any such overlords above them as are needed by the gentlemen in the International Typographic Union, who need some kind of a "sanctus spiritus" for every trifle, without the help of which they would soon be at the end of their resources.

    Further, you write that the scabs of Svornost and Hlasatel are impatiently waiting to take in the members whom you expel. Many thanks, gentlemen. We are not so greedy for numbers, a fact which you will readily agree and recognize from the fact that we have raised the initiation fee for 6our union to twenty-five dollars. If we formerly accepted every member expelled by you, you did likewise with our expelled members. Or do you wish to have proof that you have members who formerly were zealous workers in our union? Also, we did not write that the former vice-president of the International Typographical Union worked for the National Printing Company for eighteen dollars per week when he should have been getting twenty-seven dollars per week. That is an error on your part. Your colleague, who worked in a certain shop in Bohemian California for eighteen dollars a week is the one to whom we refer. If you want to know his name, your present president, Mr. Aug. Capek, can give you the information. We congratulate you upon having him. We add: how can there be any talk of lying and slander? Isn't it really slander on your part when you denounce and insult the executive committee of our Bohemian Printing Trades Union? Do you not condemn yourselves by such action? How can you write that our secretary was expelled and fined by your union, when the truth is that he resigned, 7willingly, from your union? And when someone resigns, can they still be expelled and fined? Perhaps only by you, gentlemen! Just a few more words. You call our union a "Bosses' Union." We have disproved your false assertion, and we know that the International Typographical Union No. 330 includes among its members four proprietors of printing plants, and about twenty-five shareholders of the National Printing Company. Therefore, more than half of all members of your union are "bosses." We, the members of Bohemian Printing Trades Union, wish you consolation, after a long groping in the dark. You will recognize, yes, indeed, that while they were members of your union, they were groping in the dark, but now they go by daylight, of that we assure you. In so far as your threat to pillory of every individual connected with our union is concerned, we are at your disposal. We add however, that on that pillory there will be room enough for many members of the International Typographical Union No. 330.

    8

    We must not pass by your naive mention about machinists. According to you, machinists are unnecessary in a print-shop. Why then, do you have rules requiring a machinist for each three type-setting machines? Or why are there machinsts in every larger English establishment? Well! that remuneration which your colleagues receive for the function of machinists is darned small. That the members of your union are so thoroughly familiar with typesetting machines and those of our union are not, well, that is very easily said, using your own words, but it would be hard to prove. We advise you sincerely, gentlemen, don't lie, don't slander, and don't look for splinters in your neighbors eye when you have a regular log in your own. We urge you to learn decency. Speaking of the members of our union who "chip in" quarters for beer, as far as that is concerned, what of it? At least they drink at their own expense, while somewhere else the drinking is done at the expense of the International Union. That is the only difference between the two cases.

    9

    Further, we remind you gentlemen that our organization committee is in no sense a secret body, at least not to the extent that your committee is. We will add only that just as soon as the names of your committee members are signed in full, our six member organizing committee will not hesitate a minute to do likewise.

    Every non-partisan and reasonable man who knows conditions as they exist between the publishers of Hlasatel and Svornost and their employees, who are fully satisfied with their jobs, union wages, and union working conditions, will arrive at the point of view that the Central Bohemian Printing Trades Union deserves the support of every countryman.

    Organization Committee.

    Recently, we published in this paper a communication in which we portrayed in the proper light the attacks of the International Typographical Union No. 330 directed against our union, and ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 1, I H, I F 6, I F 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 16, 1911
    The Hudson Coal Company Stockholders Appeal from the Decision of Judge Cooper

    On Saturday, an appeal was carried to the Superior Court by the former stockholders of the Hudson Coal Company against the decision rendered by Judge Cooper last week. Concerning the appeal, and the deposit of a bond of $250, we brought a report on Sunday. We find we have been misinformed. The report being different from what the case actually was, and because we consider the case as extremely important, we do not hesitate now to bring a correction of the report. As our readers will no doubt remember, some of the stockholders (names given below) at one time placed before the court a request for an accounting. It is to be understood the request was in the form of a suit against the directors of the company. In the meantime, however, the failure of the undertaking, which had been developing right from the beginning, had been brought to the attention of the stock- 2holders. We do not intend to analize the reasons for the failure here. The readers of Denni Hlasatel were able to form their opinion about it from the reports brought from the stockholders' meetings, and they will acquire a much clearer understanding when it is all thrashed out in court. The main issue at present pertains to the stockholders concerned having the right to sue the members of the board of directors for the return of that fifty per cent which they at one time loaned to the directors, or rather to the undertaking.

    We remember very well, and we brought it out in the detailed reports of meetings, that at the time when the preservation of the mine in Farmers-burg was being discussed, the stockholders were informed that this could be accomplished only if there were sufficient money on hand to pay off the mortgage. That is the way it was explained to the stockholders in the meetings held by members of the board of directors, Messrs. Ed. Winternitz, 3Ed. J. Novak, Joseph Kokes, and others. The stockholders were called on to deposit a sum equal to fifty per cent of the face value of their holdings, and they were definitely told that this money would be deposited with the treasurer of the company, Mr. Kokes, and in the event the sum gathered was insufficient to pay off the first mortgage against the mine, the money would be returned to those people who advanced it. Further it was agreed, that if a sufficiently large sum of money to pay off the mortgage was obtained, the fifty per cent would be used for that purpose, and those people who advanced it would have their money secured by a prior lien. After such an explanation and assurance, some stockholders did not hesitate to deposit the requested sums, believing that in this way they would save at least part of that which they had put into the enterprise, and which they already considered as lost. It so happened then that the mortgage was paid, but the mine still was not saved for the stockholders.

    4

    So far as is known, they finally did not even expect anything of the kind, but seeing that their money, the fifty per cent, was not guaranteed by a prior lien as had been promised them, they demanded an explanation and when that was not forthcoming to their satisfaction, they resorted to the courts. They brought suit against various members of the management, in which they asked for the return of the fifty per cent. In the meantime, the members of the board of directors brought suit for damages against some of the stockholders, who were suing them for the return of their money. Why these suits? What is the motive for them, and what is to be accomplished because of them? We do not understand. The defendants do not understand it, and finally, even the plaintiffs, themselves, do not understand it. As we have already mentioned, the stockholders brought suit for an accounting. By means of the accounting, they hoped to learn how much was actually paid for the mine in Farmersburg, and what kind of management was carried on at the mine proper, and in the local office of 5So far as is known, they finally did not even expect anything of the kind, but seeing that their money, the fifty per cent, was not guaranteed by a prior lien as had been promised them, they demanded an explanation and when that was not forthcoming to their satisfaction, they resorted to the courts. They brought suit against various members of the management, in which they asked for the return of the fifty per cent. In the meantime, the members of the board of directors brought suit for damages against some of the stockholders, who were suing them for the return of their money. Why these suits? What is the motive for them, and what is to be accomplished because of them? We do not understand. The defendants do not understand it, and finally, even the plaintiffs, themselves, do not understand it. As we have already mentioned, the stockholders brought suit for an accounting. By means of the accounting, they hoped to learn how much was actually paid for the mine in Farmersburg, and what kind of management was carried on at the mine proper, and in the local office of 6the company. This matter was dealt with before a master in chancery, and is now dependent on the Judge. Whether he will accept the Master's report, and what disposition he will make of it, remains to be seen. In the meantime, the suits for the refund of the fifty per cent were brought.

    At this stage, the members of the board of directors decided to seek an injunction against all suits which might be brought against them until such time as the original suit for an accounting shall have been decided. The stockholders offered objections to such an injunction, and the week before the case was to have been heard before Judge Cooper, both parties appeared, but the directors, through their lawyer, asked that the case be postponed. The stockholders, through their lawyer, raised a decided protest against such action, declaring that either the case would be heard then, or they would not again appear before Judge Cooper, if the 7case were continued. Naturally, they would turn to the higher courts. Overruling their protests, Judge Cooper continued the case to the following Monday. The stockholders kept their word, and did not appear in court, where a decision was then made against them. From this decision, they appealed on Saturday, depositing the prescribed bond of $250.

    The case concerns the following named members of the board of directors of the former, now reorganized, Company, though without the old stockholders. Hudson Coal Company: Joseph Kokes, Edward Winternitz, Jacob Kandlik, Anton J. Zahrobsky, Joseph Welky, Frank J. Novak, Frank Wawak and Edward J. Novak.

    The following named stockholders, who were seeking an accounting through court proceedings appealed from the decision of Judge Cooper were: William R. Walleck, John Cerny and....

    On Saturday, an appeal was carried to the Superior Court by the former stockholders of the Hudson Coal Company against the decision rendered by Judge Cooper last week. Concerning the ...

    Bohemian
    II A 2, I F 4, I D 2 a 1
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- December 25, 1911
    The Jewish Business World

    Schiff & Co. is offering 3%-interest on savings deposits. This is the oldest and most popular bank on the west side. For Jews who own houses and are not satisfied with results, this bank operates a Bureau for Landlords which offers its services for the small sum of one dollar.

    The announcement that Schiff & Co., 720--728 W. 12th Street would pay 3% on savings deposits was received by the Jewish element as a very pleasant welcome.

    Just as the Jewish population is constantly growing, so also is Jewish business growing from day to day by leaps and bounds. There is no doubt that the Jewish population on the West Side is progressing rapidly, and hence the offer of 3% interest by these Jewish bankers. The name "Schiff" signifies "reliability and honesty". It is one of the oldest Jewish business institutions in Chicago. Old and young, American or foreign-born, all know 2the name of the Schiff Bank and its location. For many years the bank has been instrumental in bringing over thousands of immigrants to their loved ones here in the U.S.A. The Schiff bank is the first institution to which immigrants turned for advice,which was given with the greatest of pleasure. In other words, the bank was a Bureau for those who needed good counsel and advice. The success of the new 3%-interest-rate was instantaneous, for Jews began to bring their savings to the bank, not only from the west side and Douglas Park, but also from all other parts of the city.

    The bank is built and managed according to the latest methods of doing banking business and contains the best safety deposit vaults, consisting of 5,000 boxes, all large size and safe; as well as 20 rooms for the convenience of customers; a steamship-ticket and bank-drafts department, in addition to all the other departments of the bank.

    Schiff & Co. is offering 3%-interest on savings deposits. This is the oldest and most popular bank on the west side. For Jews who own houses and are not satisfied ...

    Jewish
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