The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 29, 1862
    Spring Business (Editorial)

    Business prospects for Chicago are better than ever before, and this year nearly-all branches of commerce are enjoying prosperity. The future outlook is very bright indeed. This is proved by the significant fact that our merchants not only have debts but are even blessed With substantial bank balances, despite the fact that retail businessmen recently filled all their available storage space through large purchases of goods from wholesalers and jobbers; in fact, their stores are packed from basement to attic With merchandise. This favorable condition of our trade is all the more remarkable in view of the fact that our merchants have not experienced long years of prosperity, but have just passed through a period of unfavorable crises and violent shocks, which undoubtedly would have destroyed a less stable and a less healthy enterprise. In no other city of our country was business obliged to weather so many and such severe economic storms as did Chicago business during the comparatively short 2period from 1857 to 1862....

    Hardly twelve months ago, the people of Illinois lost the enormous sum of more than six million dollars through the depreciation of their currency--a loss which affected chiefly small businessmen, laborers, tradesmen, and farmers; and yet today Chicago and the State of Illinois in general enjoy a better and more independent financial status than ever before. The present stable condition of our money is an essential factor. Why amount of currency may be had, and there are prospects that interest rates will be lowered to about six per cent. However, our financial rise has its shady side, too. It appears that financial interests of other states--for example, those of New York and New England--have become aware that our municipal and state bonds have risen in value and that the monthly and weekly balances of our businessmen have increased. There financiers have therefore cast their eager eyes on the Northwest, especially on Chicago and Illinois, and intend to take advantage of our prosperity.

    Of course, we have no objection to make if reliable banks with ample capital, 3like the Bank of the State of Indiana, the State Bank of Iowa, and the larger banks of Cincinnati and Philadelphia, establish branches in our city, as long as these institutions are compelled to meet our requirement-sine-qua-non--to pay cash for their notes. But it seems that we shall be pestered by a great number of dubious eastern bank notes. At present, great efforts are being made in this direction, and it will depend on the wise determination of our businessmen whether or not we are again to exchange our gold for the rags and tatters which eastern money hawks will offer us.

    If Chicago, the granary of America and Europe, wants to be the financial and commercial lord of its own castle, if it desires to remain independent of the selfish, unscrupulous Yankee speculators, it will have to throw out their paper money, the bank notes of all of New Hampshire, New York, and Maine and establish its exchange exclusively on the basis of the new national currency, the treasury notes of the United States of America.

    The unusual activity which we noted in the real-estate market is also an 4unmistakable indication of solid prosperity and normal business conditions. The demand for real estate has been unusually large since April 1. And, mind you, we are speaking not of speculation in real estate, but of acquisition of real estate for residential or commercial purposes. Nearly all sales are for cash, and in most cases, the property sold consists of small parcels, which indicates that they have been bought for the purpose of building. There can be only one inference, namely, that the middle class, the small businessman and the laborer, too, are prosperous.

    In the outlying parts of the city, one or two miles along the streetcar lines, especially on the North Side where the Germans are strongly represented, one can see hundreds of small homes in process of construction; and upon inquiry, one learns that the lot has not been leased but has been purchased.

    All in all, we have reason to expect great commercial expansion and development during the current year. But there is one worry which tends to cast a shadow on the bright outlook, and that has to do with the coming harvest. We 5need a good deal of dry, warm weather if we are to have a good harvest of wheat; [Translator's note: The remainder of this article has been clipped out.]

    Business prospects for Chicago are better than ever before, and this year nearly-all branches of commerce are enjoying prosperity. The future outlook is very bright indeed. This is proved by ...

    German
    I D 1 a, I D 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 21, 1868
    Meeting of Saloonkeepers

    The meeting which the saloonkeepers held yesterday for the purpose of adopting a constitution and electing officers was well attended. The committee, which had been appointed to draft a constitution, submitted one. After each paragraph had been read and accepted, the entire constitution was unanimously adopted. Then, election of officers was the order of the day, with the following result:

    President: C. Lammersdorff.

    Vice-President: C. Nagel.

    Recording Secretary: C. Sievers.

    Corresponding Secretary: C. Hulke.

    Cashier: G. Oertel.

    Treasurer: J. Huhn.

    Trustees: V. Knobloch, B. Armbruster, F. Rettig.

    Aid Committee: W. Jung, Franz Koerner, H. Mehring, J. Nipsel, L. F. Metz.

    The meeting which the saloonkeepers held yesterday for the purpose of adopting a constitution and electing officers was well attended. The committee, which had been appointed to draft a constitution, ...

    German
    I D 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1871
    [The Abolition of the Income Tax]

    Editorial about the abolition of the income tax. Editor applauds U. S. Senate for having voted 26.25 for the abolition. Reasons: Rich people able to evade it (Officials and employees have to pay it). Only 275,000 people paid the tax in 1870. Obviously, very many people with incomes over $1000 evaded it.

    Income tax has a depressing and demolishing influence, penalizes the spirit of enterprise and industrial success. Its abolition will be of advantage not only for those who had to pay it, but has the whole of the population.

    Editorial about the abolition of the income tax. Editor applauds U. S. Senate for having voted 26.25 for the abolition. Reasons: Rich people able to evade it (Officials and employees ...

    German
    I H, I D 1 b, I D 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 07, 1871
    [Political Matters]

    Editorial Blast of triumph greeting the election of Blaine, a high tariff man, to the speakership of the House. "It is a catastrophe for the new revenue Reform Party, and it must have been for the Chicago Tribune, "bitter as gale and wormwood."

    "But- in the sense in which now the Tribune wants revenue reform, to be understood, we can completely agree with her. Yes, we go even much farther. Of the life necessities the Tribune wants to exempt only coal and salt from import duties. We not only agree with that, but demand also, the reduction to abolition of the duties on coffee, tea, sugar, rice, spices, and other necessities, that are being produced in our country either not at all or not in sufficient quantity. This to us seems free trade in the right direction, and much more important than the reduction of duties on products of underpaid European factory labor, with which the higher paid American worker cannot compete. Every policy that raises the value of home labor is advancing culture; every policy that reduced it is hostile to civilization.

    Reduction of duties and taxes is a perfectly Justifiable demand, with which every Republican can fully sympathize. The colossal income surpluses of the Federal Government are an evil that must be fought resolutely."

    Editorial Blast of triumph greeting the election of Blaine, a high tariff man, to the speakership of the House. "It is a catastrophe for the new revenue Reform Party, and ...

    German
    I D 1 a, I J, I D 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 13, 1871
    [The Great Fire]

    Mr. Gustave Drassler, who had a shop on North Clark Street, and his whole family died in the flames; likewise his older brother, who used to carry dispatches at night to the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, and his niece, Miss Richter, who was a member of the Germania Female Choir. Mr. Henry Lamparter lost his wife, Mrs. Louisa Thielemann whose house burnt down two years ago, and who, only a few days ago, started, at great personal sacrifice, a German theatre on the North Side, has lost everything, and now faces the future more bewildered than ever. The maid of Mrs. Thielemann, and the maid of her neighbour, Mr. Barthold Meyer, Ontario Street, lost their lives in the fire. Brother Moody has not been able to abstain from inviting the people in to pray. Mr. Hermann Raster has found a domicile with his colleague, Mr. T. Konig of the "Union", 386 W. Taylor Street. Ernestine Schmidt is being sought by her husband, Christian Schmidt, in Ditmars' Pharmacy. Mr. Henry Hochbaum and L. and R. Berlitzheimer whose shops on the North Side were burned, have, with their characteristic energy, already reopened their shops on Milwaukee Avenue. Henry Schollkopf, Groceries; Bauer and Company, Music Instruments; Gale & Blocki; Knauer 2Brothers and many other Germans are feverishly busy with the arrangement of their new shops. The Germans don't take second place after the Americans as to energy. The Thursday meeting in the Vorwarts Turnhalle could not take place, because the Turn Hall is being used as a hospital. Mr. Wilhelm Levy, formerly of the Staats-Zeitung, is now a special policeman. Mrs. Julia Butz, fortunately, is well, so that the contrary rumors dissolve into naught.

    Mr. Gustave Drassler, who had a shop on North Clark Street, and his whole family died in the flames; likewise his older brother, who used to carry dispatches at night ...

    German
    II D 10, III A, I D 1 b, II B 1 c 1, III B 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 01, 1871
    [The Great Fire]

    Mr. Franz Arnold has left for Europe as a representative of the German National Bank and of H. Greenebaum and Company, in order to make available the millions needed for the reconstruction of Chicago. At the same time Mr. Blum has gone to New York in order to have the mortgages (with coupons attached) fabricated, which shall serve as security for the millions that shall be borrowed from Europe.

    Mr. Franz Arnold has left for Europe as a representative of the German National Bank and of H. Greenebaum and Company, in order to make available the millions needed for ...

    German
    II D 10, IV, III H, I D 1 b, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 01, 1871
    [The Great Fire]

    All the butchers who have suffered through the great fire are asked to visit the undersigned committee on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday, between 2 and 4 o'clock, at the corner of Union and Randolph streets. At the same time we ask all Chicago butchers, whose business places have not burned down and who wish to help their burnt-down business comrades, to get in touch with us in order to organize help for the urgent need.

    (Signed): R. Lotholz, Jacob Koch, Moses Berg, and Jacob Schneider.

    (The retail meat business in Chicago is almost exclusively in German hands, and these people must be helped both from here and from outside, because they deserve and need it. Our common interest is to keep this important business in German hands.)

    All the butchers who have suffered through the great fire are asked to visit the undersigned committee on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday, between 2 and 4 o'clock, at the corner ...

    German
    II D 10, I C, III A, II A 2, I D 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 14, 1872
    Protection and Schurz

    No thinking laborer or business man can listen to one of the long speeches of Senator Schurz, without noting how carefully the speaker avoids all reference to protection of home industries and the practical issues of taxes and custom fees. While the Chicago Tribune has preached for years that reform consisting in the abrogation of customs duties should be effected, so the excessive high labor wages may be lowered, Mr. Schurz has nothing to say concerning this important question. And he well knows that these questions are of great importance to the majority of Germans. Nine-tenths of the German population of America are diligent laborers or small storekeepers. Among them are thousands of whom a protective tariff is of vital importance. Should the tariff on iron be lowered, as the apostles of free trade advocate, the big rolling mills in Chicago that provide a livelihood for thousands of families, would have to close their doors, because they could not compete with the cheap capital and labor of the mills in England.

    2

    These questions are of greater importance to the German public than they are to English-American, because the German laborers, are much greater. While Mr. Schurz knows this, he does not talk about it because he can not say anything in conformity to the wishes of his German listeners. Now which is more important to the laborer, Schurz as Secretary of State, or protection to home industries?

    No thinking laborer or business man can listen to one of the long speeches of Senator Schurz, without noting how carefully the speaker avoids all reference to protection of home ...

    German
    I D 1 a, I D 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 29, 1875
    State Taxes (Editorial)

    Again the Illinois General Assembly has proved that, when money matters are concerned, the difference between country and city, farmer and urbanite, is more pronounced than the difference between political parties. About eight years ago, Illinois had a so-called Board of Equalization which was established for the sole purpose of plundering the larger cities, above all Chicago, for the benefit of our noble farmers. The Board has done its work with criminal impudence. It not only doubled the tax levied upon Chicago, after the taxes had been increased by twenty-four per cent, and then even by ninety-eight per cent, but, at the same time, it deducted more than a million acres from the taxable property of farmers, thus committing a twofold swindle. In this year's session of the Illinois General Assembly the first attack was made against this band of robbers (the Board), but without the desired result. As soon as the matter was introduced all party differences 2ceased; Republican, Democratic, and Independent farmers, or rather representatives from rural communities, cast aside all party differences and united to protect the "sacred rights" of the farmers to rob and pillage the "contemptible" cities. And so the proposal to abolish the Board of Equalization was rejected by a great majority, giving the "loyal," "honest," and "good" tiller of the soil, who so often is represented as a living proof that the American people are thoroughly moral, further opportunity to let evil urbanites pay their (the farmers') taxes.

    However, at least one improvement has been made in tax legislation, or, more correctly stated, at least one absurdity that is beyond the human mind's powers of comprehension has been removed. In their greedy desire to place their burden of taxation upon the "infamous capitalists," the rural members of a former legislature had introduced a twofold tax levy upon corporations. First, the physical property of joint stock corporations, which was used to acquire their capital, was taxed, and then also the stock certificates as so much separate capital. For instance, twenty people furnish $500 [sic] 3each, or a total of $100,000, for the purpose of, say, establishing a lumber mill, or a furniture factory, or a newspaper. The $100,000 was used to purchase buildings, machines, raw materials, etc., and each of the twenty people, who contributed the necessary money, received evidence of part ownership in the enterprise, in the form of stock certificates. Let us assume that $85,000 was used to establish the business, and $15,000 to meet operating expenses, that is, to pay salaries, etc., until the first profits were realized; then $85,000 would remain in the form of physical property. Our rural tax "artists" figured thus: Here we have, first, $85,000 in tangible property, and there we have $100,000 in capital stock--we shall tax that also; so we have $185,000 of taxable property.

    This system of taxation showed itself in all its glory when taxes were levied upon privately owned and corporate businesses of the same nature. In the one case only tangilbe property was taxed; in the other the tangible property and the capital stock, or stock certificates which were merely a receipt for money that was invested in the tangible property. In this way the Chicago Times and 4the Chicago Journal, which are owned each by one person, were taxed only for tangible property; but the Tribune, Interocean, Post, and the three German dailies, all of which are owned by corporations, had to pay the twofold tax.

    It is needless to say that this differentiation was felt as a penalty by all of those who had pooled their resources to establish stock companies. The system operated exclusively to the advantage of large corporations and to the detriment of those who invested their earnings in the stock of small companies. It was "killing the goose that laid the golden egg".

    One of the few creditable services rendered by the present legislature was the removal of this nonsensical system of taxation. Another was the abolishing of the different interest rates which creditors may charge for loans. To maintain these various rates would mean to drive all capital furnished by people living in other states, to other parts of the country. It is gratifying to know that our infuriated rural legislators did not permit their 5animosity towards "nefarious capital," to cause them to commit such a suicidal folly. However, our hopes of being blessed with a thorough improvement of our tax system through the application of common sense methods, must be deferred two years hence, when our vulturous Board of Equalization may also be abolished.

    Again the Illinois General Assembly has proved that, when money matters are concerned, the difference between country and city, farmer and urbanite, is more pronounced than the difference between political ...

    German
    I L, I F 3, I D 1 b, I D 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 03, 1879
    Free Sons of Israel

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to its poor and sick members, as well as the help to their widows and orphans, and the decent burials of the dead, give convincing proof of its humanitarian spirit. There are eight lodges of this Order in Chicago at present, and it was decided three years ago that the Order should have its own cemetery; as a consequence thereof, five and one-half acres of land were bought near Waldheim (Forest Home). Through an assessment of five dollars on each member, the first payments were made, a fence was erected, a caretaker's house was built, and trees were planted, etc.

    The administration in charge of the burial ground is called the Cemetery Association of the Free Sons [of Israel], and it consists of three delegates from each lodge. Thus far, only a few family burial plots have been sold and the Association, therefore, is confronted with large debts. [In order to remedy this situation] the Cemetery Association resolved to hold a fair 2at Uhlich's Hall, from March 2 to 9, in order to pay off the mortgage. The general public is requested to give generous support to this philanthropic endeavor, and, particularly, not to let the various committee members, who are entrusted with collections, go away empty-handed when they come seeking articles for the fair.

    The Esther Lodge, a ladies auxiliary club of the Order, has already shown active interest and obtained gratifying results, which will do much in making the fair an outstanding as well as a financial success.

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, II F, II D 1, II A 2, I D 1 b, II B 1 c 3