The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 06, 1862
    The Inaugural Address of Mayor Francis C. Sherman (Editorial)

    On page four of this issue, in the description of the inaugural ceremonies of the new city administration, our readers will find the complete inaugural address of Mayor Francis C. Sherman.

    Although we are political opponents of the new chief executive, we must admit that we are entirely satisfied with his speech and with the principles and opinions which are expressed in it. With respect to the terrible Civil War which is raging in the country, the Mayor takes the same position that is assumed by Republicans and all law-abiding and freedom-loving citizens, irrespective of political differences and partisanship. While Mr. Sherman opposed the election of President Lincoln, he declared that it is fortunate for the country and for the cause of freedom and justice that Lincoln's 2administration has proved to be patriotic, conservative, and efficient. We hope that we shall be able to say the same of the city administration of Mayor Sherman.

    Concerning Sunday amusements, the new Mayor voiced opinions which the Germans in this city will hail with especially great satisfaction. Mr. Sherman takes the position which the Illinois Staats-Zeitung has advocated for years: that police authorities should not interfere with such amusements as long as they remain within the bounds of decency and do not disturb the public peace or the religious services of the Christian citizens of the city.

    In regard to fees for licenses, the Mayor would make a distinction between retailers of distilled liquors and those who sell beer and light wines; he recommends that the license fees for the latter group be decreased. From this we infer that the Mayor now has the right idea about temperance; for 3an increase in the consumption of lager beer and light wines, in which term Americans include grape wines, means that less whiskey will be consumed, and thus the cause of moderation will be promoted.

    Although the voters of Chicago voiced their wish in no uncertain terms, the police commissioners do not yet see fit to submit to the will of the majority of the people by resigning. Indeed, they have asked one lawyer after another for legal opinions on the matter; they have printed and circulated these opinions, and we heard long ago that they intend to resist the will of the people and retain their well-paid offices. And that is just like them. The Mayor promises that he will reorganize the police, and we hope that he will soon show these stubborn commissioners the Court House door. All good citizens are disgusted by this violation of republican principles, and will side with the Mayor in this matter.

    As long as the new administration remains free of partisanship, as long as it works for the welfare of the public, it will have the support of the people and the press.

    On page four of this issue, in the description of the inaugural ceremonies of the new city administration, our readers will find the complete inaugural address of Mayor Francis C. ...

    German
    I F 3, I B 2, I B 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 07, 1867
    Anti-Temperance Meeting

    The delegates of several German societies met at Workingmen's Hall, on Madison Street, last evening, to discuss a proposed anti -temperance meeting.

    Six societies were represented by delegates, namely: the Chicago Arbeiterverein (Chicago Workingmen's Association), the Socialer Arbeiterverein, the Chicago Turngemeinde, the Aurora Turnverein, the Turnverein Vorwaerts, and the Chicago Union Turnverein.

    The Rink on Wabash Avenue was recommended as a suitable place for the meeting.

    The following committees were appointed:

    Committee to select time and place of meeting: Mr. Lobstein, Mr. Hertwig, and Mr. Von Langen.

    2

    Speakers' committee: Mr. Sievers, Mr. Hand, and Mr. von Langen.

    Committee on resolutions: Mr. Gottfried, Mr. Hertwig. Mr. Bartels, Mr. Behrend, Mr. Standau, Mr. Stoecken, and Mr. von Langen.

    Committee on organization: Mr. Erbe, Mr. Saehn, Mr. Hertwing, Mr. Hand, and Mr. von Langen.

    It was decided to meet again next Sunday at 2 P. M. at the same place. The meeting was then adjourned.

    The delegates of several German societies met at Workingmen's Hall, on Madison Street, last evening, to discuss a proposed anti -temperance meeting. Six societies were represented by delegates, namely: the ...

    German
    I B 1, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 13, 1867
    Report on Second Anti-Temperance Meeting of Delegates of German Societies by H. von Langen (Secretary)

    The following Societies were represented by delegates: Chicago Arbeiterverein: J. Bartell, J. Gruenhut, Mr. Hack, Mr. Kunze, L. Sievers.

    Socialer Arbeiterverein: J. Berndt, J. Lobstein, Christ Hardoe, Eduard Herbertz, Christ Schroeder.

    Chicago Turngemeinde: A. Erbe, J. Standau, P. Hand.

    Aurora Turnverein: A. Sohn, J. Michael, H. von Langen.

    Union Turnverein: F. Hoecken, L. Oberndorf, G. Schoefer.

    Turnverein Vorwaerts: Wilhelm Gottfried, F. Knepper, L. Flint.

    2

    Brewers' Association: H. B. Miller, G. Schmidt, C. Seipp.

    Germania Saengerbund: E. Dietzsch, T. J. Bluthardt, J. Claussenius.

    Mr. Bartell who was appointed chairman opened the meeting.

    The minutes of the previous meeting were approved as read.

    The committee appointed to find a suitable hall reported that Crosby's Hall was available for any evening of this and next week for $150.

    P. Hand moved that this hall be chosen for the mass meeting. The report amended by Mr. Hand's proposal was adopted.

    J. Standau moved that the meeting be held next Saturday evening, August 17; this motion was adopted.

    3

    Mr. Standau and Mr. Hertwig presented two resolutions to the committee on resolutions. The committee was instructed to confer with the chairman and the speakers to determine the contents and wording of suitable resolutions.

    C. Dietzsch, and H. B. Miller were added to the membership of the committee on resolutions.

    The speaker's committee reported that it had invited Mr. Raster, Mr. Juessen, Mr. Arnold, and Mr. Siebold to address the meeting and that these gentlemen had accepted the invitation. The report was adopted.

    Dr. Schmidt happened to be present and was unanimously elected to act as chairman at the mass meeting.

    The committee on organization proposed the following men as vice-chairman: Caspar Butz, Hans Balatka, Johann George Gindele.....[The names of thirty-three 4additional men are listed--all of them prominent in German social, business, and professional life.]

    On the recommendation of P. Hand, J. Standau and H. von Langen were chosen to act as secretaries.

    A. Erbe moved that a committee of three be elected to engage the services of a band. The motion was adopted and the following were chosen: C. Seipp, F. J. Bluthardt, and E. Dietzsch.

    The delegates also resolved to ask the co-operation of the choruses of the Chicago Arbeiterverein and the Chicago Turngemeinde.

    The committee on organization was instructed to advertise the meeting in the newspapers and by posters.

    After Mr. J. Hertwig's action in publishing an invitation to the meeting in this newspaper had been approved, adjournment was noted.

    The following Societies were represented by delegates: Chicago Arbeiterverein: J. Bartell, J. Gruenhut, Mr. Hack, Mr. Kunze, L. Sievers. Socialer Arbeiterverein: J. Berndt, J. Lobstein, Christ Hardoe, Eduard Herbertz, Christ ...

    German
    I B 1, IV, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 17, 1867
    Anent the Temperance Movement (Editorial)

    Our friends in Aurora sent us the September 12 issue of their Beacon, in which there is a detailed report of a meeting which was held on September 1 by the advocates of temperance. We cannot say that the report offers anything new or original. It is the old story, although the "mourning brigade" was not represented. It is interesting to learn that the apostles of bigotry and hatred still persecute us Teutons as "diabolical opponents of the most salutary reform the world has ever heard of". Since these so-called reformers are still active, it is up to us Germans to unite with the enlightened English-speaking citizens in making war on a common enemy.

    The main speaker in the aforementioned meeting was the Honorable Charles Button.

    2

    "Who are they," asks this clergyman, with the righteous indignation of an Old Testament prophet. "Who are they that organize 'beer conventions' in opposition to our efforts to reform our fellow men? Who are they that lend their hand to overthrow the institutions of this great Republic and refuse to support any candidate for public office who does not promise to do everything within his power to abolish all Sunday laws? They are our German fellow citizens. They are trying with might and main to undermine the Christian religion, and therewith the very foundation of free government. They threaten to bring about the defeat of the Republican party unless that political body advocates free whiskey and free beer.

    "The Germans rendered valuable services; they fought very bravely in the late War, but they have no right to force upon the New World the unrepublican and immoral principles which they brought with them when they came here from the old country. Beer gardens and desecration of the Sabbath was against morality and cannot be tolerated. The Germans speak of their rights, but 3are they the only citizens of American who have rights? Have the adherents to religion and the advocates of law, order, and temperance no rights?"

    We need not tell our readers, and especially our friends in Aurora, that this is all bosh. This good man, like all his "brethren in the Lord," is laboring under the foolish notion that this great continent was created solely for the benefit of a few thousand New England "saints," and that all other nationalities are nothing but helots who are subservient to the whims of fanatical puritans. And as to the desires and ambitions of Germans and their attitude toward liberty, justice, and equality--well he knows as little about them as a blind man knows about colors. Were this not so, he would not prate about "Teutonic endeavors to overthrow the institutions of this country, and to transplant to America unrepubliean and inmoral principles". Indeed, this country would be much better off if none of its inhabitants were more unrepublican and immoral than the Germans are. There is no other nation that is less disposed to encroach upon the rights of 4others, and it was not until the Germans came to the United States that they learned to appreciate and to cling to the rights that are guaranteed all Americans in our precious documents, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States. However, the advocates of temperance are acting in the manner of all fanatics. While they still have stolen goods in their possession, they cry, "Stop thief!" And while they are endeavoring to convince others of the excellence of their narrow-minded bigotry, and would have the state force their unjust measures upon others, they complain of attempts to deprive them of their constitutional rights. There is no remedy against such blindness, and, as we all know, we cannot expect to get anything but beef from an ox.

    Mr. Young who spoke after Mr. Mutton, I mean Button, is a very crafty person. He said, among other things, that "the best way to enforce prohibition laws is to grant women the right to vote," and that he was "not in favor of permitting flunkies who had all their possessions wrapped in a handkerchief when they 5came over here, to frustrate the will which women voice at the polls".

    Is there anything else that bothers you, Mr. Young? Have you any other pains? It seems you would deprive German immigrants of the right to vote, and grant women that right, and, as the press informs us daily, women frequently employ very radical measures to gain their objects.

    We hope that our friends in Aurora will give this impudent scoundrel, who is supposed to be of German descent, a good piece of their mind. They have a good opportunity to do so, for this fellow is a job hunter, a candidate for representative to Congress. [Translator's note: It is not clear whether the author refers to Mr. Button or Mr. Young in this paragraph.]

    Our friends in Aurora sent us the September 12 issue of their Beacon, in which there is a detailed report of a meeting which was held on September 1 by ...

    German
    I B 1, I C, I B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 14, 1867
    Captain E. F. C. Klokke (Editorial)

    Captain E. F. C. Klokke, a soldier who served in the old Hecker Regiment (Twenty-fourth Illinois) has agreed to accede to the wishes of his friends and become a candidate for the office of Clerk of the Superior Court.

    Captain Klokke was a brave soldier, according to the unanimous opinion of his comrades in arms and superior officers. He is a loyal Republican, and a sworn enemy of all fanatics and advocates of temperance. He is able and ambitious, respected as a citizen and soldier, and deserves the support of all true Republicans. We heartily recommend him to our voters.

    Captain E. F. C. Klokke, a soldier who served in the old Hecker Regiment (Twenty-fourth Illinois) has agreed to accede to the wishes of his friends and become a candidate ...

    German
    I F 1, I B 1, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 16, 1867
    Meeting of German Saloonkeepers

    Yesterday the German saloonkeepers of the city met at 23 West Madison Street to elect a delegate to serve on the Anti-Temperance Committee. All the men present were convinced that in view of the peculiar circumstances in which the saloonkeepers of Chicago find themselves today--everyone of them is prey to the whims and arbitrary acts of the police department--it is absolutely necessary to organize to protect their interests. In various parts of the city the outlawed Sunday laws are enforced more or less strictly, depending upon circumstances; some saloonkeepers are being favored and others are wronged.

    After the meeting had been called to order by Mr. Kuper, the chairman, of the Committee, Wilhelm Rintelmann was appointed chairman of the meeting. Wilhelm Schaefer was unanimously elected as a delegate to the Anti-Temperance Committee, and a committee of seven members was chosen to 2interview all saloonkeepers with reference to organizing an association of saloonkeepers.

    Yesterday the German saloonkeepers of the city met at 23 West Madison Street to elect a delegate to serve on the Anti-Temperance Committee. All the men present were convinced that ...

    German
    I B 1, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 22, 1867
    Opium Eaters (Editorial)

    "Brother" Peterson, of the "temperance platform," issues a detailed report of the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Good Templars. In this report some questions pertaining to conscience are asked and answered in a very interesting manner. We quote one:

    Question: "Is the habitual use of opium as a stimulant considered wrong if it causes intoxication or violation of our obligations?"

    Answer: "No. However, great care must be exercised in such cases."

    Here we have the gist of the whole tendency and objective of temperance advocates. Even the most moderate consumption of pure, harmless, and wholesome beverages--beer, wine, and cider--is a great crime in the eyes of 2these arrogant hypocrites; but the use of opium, the most devitalizing and enervating of all known vices, is not considered to be a violation of their temperance vow.

    By their own admission it is clear why the use of opium in the United States has increased three or four times during the past ten years. The advocates of temperance are using it!! And this association, which admittedly is addicted to this vice which enslaves those who practice it more than any other bad habit can, wants to prescribe for, and force moral laws upon their fellowmen! Was there ever a more infamous or despicable humbug?

    We have seen Chinese in their secret haunts where they indulge in the forbidden use of opium; we have observed them in all stages of the effect of this poison, from the stimulation of the first few drafts to the climax of intoxication and thence to the misery of the inevitable headache and nausea, and thus we have a good idea of what takes place in a private session 3of the temperance advocates. And now we ask in all fairness: Shall the majority of the people of the United States be governed and bamboozled by these men who are weak slaves to their secret vices?

    Never!!

    "Brother" Peterson, of the "temperance platform," issues a detailed report of the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Good Templars. In this report some questions pertaining to conscience are asked ...

    German
    I B 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 23, 1867
    The Election (Editorial)

    On page eight of this newspaper there is a list of members of the County and the ward Committees which are to manage the coming campaign. It is evident that only experienced Republicans have been chosen, and they may be relied upon to put forth their best efforts in attaining favorable results for the party. The County Campaign Committee will meet every morning to receive reports and announcements from the Ward Committees.

    The outcome of the October elections in Ohio and Pennsylvania has given this year's County election an importance that it would not normally have. Chicago is the citadel of the Liberty party in the Northwest. Our opponents will do everything they possibly can to gain a victory here, so that they may noise it abroad to prove their statement that "the attitude of the 2people has undergone a change. Even a considerable decrease in the Republican majority, or the defeat of one of the Republican candidates would greatly encourage the Democrats and exercise a depressive influence upon the Liberty party in our own state and in the other states of the Northwest."

    We may be confident that the German Republicans of Chicago do not want to see the Republican majority in Cook County diminished by a lukewarm attitude. For unlike their brothers in other states, they have no just reason to be dissatisfied with their English-speaking companions. Not one of the prominent local Republicans of American birth who stand high in the councils of the party is in favor of temperance or the Sunday laws advocated by a few party adherents who will have no influence whatever if the party itself does not split. There is no party strife in regard to the so-called blue laws in Chicago as there is in New York. Moreover, there is complete harmony on all principal issues. And as far as participation by Germans in the 3administration of public offices is concerned, it is probably greater today than at any previous time; it is greater in Chicago than in any other large city of the United States, as is apparent from the many German names that appear on the County, Ward, and Township tickets. It was pointed out recently that with the exception of one person, every German who was nominated at this year's convention was elected.

    It will depend principally upon the efforts and the zeal of the Germans whether or not Chicago, in contrast to other cities, will prove to be an impregnable fortress against the onslaughts of the reactionaries in the November election.

    On page eight of this newspaper there is a list of members of the County and the ward Committees which are to manage the coming campaign. It is evident that ...

    German
    I B 1, I F 5, I F 1, I B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 09, 1871
    [The Temperance Problem]

    Yesterday evening a mass meeting against the temperance fanatics took place in the Northside Turn Hall.

    Herr Michaelis opened the meeting and proposed Mr. Max Eberhardt as chairman. Dr. Lebell was nominated as secretary. On a motion of Mr. Michelson the chairman nominated a resolutions' committee consisting of Messrs. Edmund Jussen. Julius Rutisheuser, Albert Michelson and Cherles Haussner.

    Mr. Emil Dietzsch said the time had come when the Germans at last could energetically demand to be left alone and in peace in regard to the temperance issue.

    Mr. Schlager gave a historical survey of the events since the election of the so-called Peoples Ticket in 1869. The majority has not only challenged the Germans by reinstituting an old ordinance, but had added insult by decreeing the total closing of the inns from midnight to midnight.

    Fortunately, the November elections are not far off. We will have to elect twenty aldermen, and if the Germans use their influence wisely we should be able to elect aldermen who will have promised before the election to insist 2Whereas the City Council of Chicago has enacted an ordinance on June 5th, prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages on Sundays - be it therefore resolved by the German-American citizens of Chicago -

    1. That the German-American element of Chicago declares all encroachment by the Temperance and Prudery Movements on its social and civic rights as unconstitutional......

    6. That we are firmly resolved not to sacrifice our rights for all the demonstrations of professional politicians who tell us that we might endanger the Republican Party. As long as one party represents genuinely republican principles we fight in its ranks, but when it deteriorates into a tool of the Prudery Movement and prestly power (Muckerthum and Pfaffengewalt) then we regard it as our duty to start the organization of a more liberal party......

    9. That we regard it as the duty of all German-American papers fearlessly and energetically to support the German-American interest against the intolerant Prudery Movement, without regard for the possible consequences for any extant party organization......

    11. That a committee shall be nominated to hand copies of this resolution to

    Yesterday evening a mass meeting against the temperance fanatics took place in the Northside Turn Hall. Herr Michaelis opened the meeting and proposed Mr. Max Eberhardt as chairman. Dr. Lebell ...

    German
    I B 1, IV, I F 4, I F 1, I B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 07, 1871
    (From a Reporter's Article Describing the Progress of the Reconstruction of the North Side.)

    A sad spectacle are the churches, chapels, and other prayer houses lying in ruins. The German churches, in every case, were connected with elementary schools. The most urgent business of the Germans as a nationality in Chicago is the providing of temporary school rooms. We saw the ruins of many school houses visited by children who formerly were taught there. It is to be hoped that Germans will insist on their rights in this respect with the utmost stubbornness, so that as many cheap school rooms can be fixed up as possible. The infamous thievery of the "school palaces" must to be repeated in new Chicago. The scoundrelly and arbitrary action of the school board in banishing after the fire German instruction from the free schools, hits the north side painfully because there are settlements that are purely German where English is hardly understood in the homes. The bigoted nativism of the fossils on the school board this time has shown itself in its naked hideousness. The 3 German members find themselves shamefully abandoned by the Irish with whom they are otherwise firmly allied.

    Inns have been put up in great numbers everywhere on the north side. Beer wagons 2are driving heavily loaded to the settlements of Germans, as well as the Scandinavians and Irish. The patronage by the public yesterday was very strong, and happy singing resounded from many places as formerly. The proclamation of the mayor about the closing of inns on election day counts hardly for much on the north side; it expects too much from the innkeepers in these hard times.

    It is very pleasant to see that already so many brick houses are being built on the north side for permanence, especially by the Germans.

    The American residential district between Clark Street and the lake front (from Kinzie street to Lincoln Park) is still pretty much in ruins. There is a project to extend Lincoln Park and the driveway along the shore southwards to the neighborhood of the waterworks, and to build a hotel on the corner of Superior and Pine streets. But the Americans want to have the breweries moved out west toward the river. Otherwise permanent luxury buildings and gardens could not be thought of. It is not in the interest of the Germans to drive the Americans through a few disagreeable establishments out of their lake shore strip and thereby possibly to prevent the extension of Lincoln Park and the drive way. We have therefore received with regret the information that Busch and Brand have begun to reconstruct their brewery at the old spot. It is in the interest of the whole north side to 3see the breweries moved out at the city periphery.

    A sad spectacle are the churches, chapels, and other prayer houses lying in ruins. The German churches, in every case, were connected with elementary schools. The most urgent business of ...

    German
    I A 1 a, I C, I F 3, I B 1, III A, I A 1 b