The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 26, 1862
    Quarterly Report of the President of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein (Published at the request of the Verein)

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has received a copy. As far as we can judge at this time, the Verein will do well under it. The finances of the Verein are in good condition. The library of the Verein has been enlarged considerably, and the members have contributed their share to charity. It is hardly necessary to remind the members that the Verein is obligated to participate in every good work. Thus far, the organization has a good record in this respect.

    The following contributions were made for benevolent purposes during the past six months:

    2

    For Hecker's Regiment.....................$ 50.00

    For the wives of Union soldiers.......... 205.00

    For sick and wounded soldiers............ 50.00

    Total.........................................$305.00

    I thank the members and friends of the Verein who have assisted in obtaining these contributions.

    Disbursements for Library

    For periodicals:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...........$ 35.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862................... 37.00

    Total.....................................................$ 72.00

    3

    For books and binding:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...$135.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862............. 88.00

    Total.............................................$223.00

    If the library of a society may be considered a barometer of the educational standing of the members, we can view our shelves and cases with great satisfaction, since we have purchased the works of Dickens, Sir Walter Scott, Feuerbach, Hacklaender, Freiligrath, Cooper, Auerbach, Spindler, etc. The report of the librarian shows that our members are making good use of this source of education.

    The English night school which our Verein maintains for the benefit of the members has been in session regularly throughout the winter, which shows that our members also appreciate this opportunity to acquire knowledge. And the attendance would certainly have been much larger if the school were more 4centrally located, and if many had not been prevented by business, work, etc. from attending the school.

    The Verein also provided for the choral section. The entertainment given for the benefit of our singers netted $47.72, and this sum was turned over to the treasurer with the express understanding that he use the money to purchase music, etc.

    Fortunately, there were not many cases of sickness among the members; we seldom had more than three cases at a time, and there were no deaths.

    Our affiliation with the Peoria Arbeiter-Verein, should it materialize, will be the first step in our endeavor to spread the principles laid down in our constitution. It is desirable that our members who make their homes in other cities try to organize an Arbeiterverein there, using our constitution as a model, so that eventually anyone who leaves Chicago and settles in some other city will find an affiliated society in which he may become a member, and thus continue to 5receive the benefits which he now enjoys as a member of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein.

    Our Sunday evening entertainments have always been very well attended. It would be a great advantage to the members if the committee on lectures could provide for a lecture every two weeks. Besides stimulating the mind and increasing the knowledge of ambitious members and their friends, such lectures would, in my opinion, be the best means of getting rid of the class of people that thinks only of itself and its amusement and gives no thought to the responsibility which the Verein assumes when it arranges for this kind of entertainment. Let no one say that these people are afflicted with boredom only at certain lectures. The fact is that they are bored at every serious lecture. That was proved at the lecture on the death of Lovejoy, a martyr to the cause of liberty. Fortunately, there are only a few who place little value on education, and the sooner these people cease coming to our hall when serious topics are discussed, the better it will be for all concerned. And even if the subject matter is above the mental capacity of some of those who come to the meeting place of the Verein, they ought 6to have manners enough not to disturb those who want to listen, and should show enough respect for the lecturer to be quiet at least while he is speaking.....

    At the last meeting, the members elected a committee which has the duty of obtaining fuel at less than retail cost. I have a recommendation to make in regard to this matter. The Verein has some money in a bank. How about using it to buy fuel at wholesale for the benefit of members, and the treasury of the Verein? If each member should save only fifty cents by buying a ton of coal from the Verein, and the Verein should realize seventy-five cents on the transaction, the member would have a substantial saving, and, with coal at four dollars per ton, the Verein's money would have an earning capacity as follows:

    Net profit on investment $100 $18.75
    " " " " 400 75.00
    " " " " 533 100.00
    7

    That certainly is more than a bank pays, or can pay. And that is but three fifths of the entire profit, since the fifty cents saved by the purchaser must be considered also. Thus, if we would invest the whole of our bank balance ($533), the entire profit would be $100 for the Verein and $66.66 for the members. That would be a gain of 311/4 per cent, and the danger of loss would be eliminated because all transactions would be for cash only. I recommend that the Verein give this matter serious consideration.

    At the end of the last quarter the membership of the Verein was 389, a gain of 49.

    I have the great pleasure of informing you that a much friendlier spirit now prevails in our business meetings. When there is debating, it is done with less bitterness, and without sarcastic references to individuals. Thus the spirit of brotherhood is growing stronger, and as long as it asserts its power, the Verein will flourish.

    Theodor Hielscher,

    President of Chicago Arbeiter-Verein

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has ...

    German
    II D 1, I A 3, II D 10, II B 1 a, II B 2 g, II B 2 f, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 09, 1875
    The Chicago Athenaeum

    The Chicago Athenaeum's evening school will commence the fall semester in about two weeks. A class is contemplated for Germans who desire to obtain a thorough knowledge of English. If the class is organized, Professor Groh will be the instructor. He has taught German at the Athenaeum for two years.

    All who desire to be enrolled in the class are asked to apply promptly so that their names may be recorded.

    The directorate of the Athenaeum intends to increase the scope of the institution. Anyone will be accepted, regardless of creed, sex or nationality, provided that he is of irreproachable character.

    A gymnasium connected with the institution; gives ample opportunity for bodily development.

    2

    Further particulars may be learned at the headquarters, at 63--65 Washington Street.

    The Chicago Athenaeum's evening school will commence the fall semester in about two weeks. A class is contemplated for Germans who desire to obtain a thorough knowledge of English. If ...

    German
    II B 2 f, I A 3
  • Svornost -- December 09, 1878
    [Evening Classes in English]

    The teaching of English has begun in the evening school. Classes are held on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 7:30 P. M. Anyone wishing to join these classes will kindly report to Mr. Matas at 734 Morgan Street.

    The teaching of English has begun in the evening school. Classes are held on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 7:30 P. M. Anyone wishing to join these classes will kindly ...

    Bohemian
    I A 3, III A
  • Svornost -- May 19, 1879
    [Bohemian Neglect Library]

    The Chicago Public Library Commissioners will in the near future purchase a considerable stock of new books of English, German, French and Scandinavian publication. For the purchase of Bohemian books not one cent has been set aside thus far in spite of the fact that we are continually boasting that there are 25,000 Bohemians in this city. Some time ago the "Ctenarska" Beseda"(Reading Club) managed to have appropriated about $500.00 for the purchase of Bohemian books, and requested a catalogue of recommended volumes, but since then everything seems to have been forgotten again. Since no one seems to be interested enough to go to the public library and ask for Bohemian publications, it is not to be wondered at, that the directors of this institution do not purchase Bohemian books in a great hurry, that we are considered as ignoramuses who do not know how to recognize the importance of a library.

    We ask for the third time: Does the "Ctenarska Beseda" (Reading Club) whose aim it should be, intend to do something about this matter. It is dependent on the Club to push this matter, because the first action in this cause was taken over two years ago by the Club.

    The Chicago Public Library Commissioners will in the near future purchase a considerable stock of new books of English, German, French and Scandinavian publication. For the purchase of Bohemian books ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 a, I A 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 11, 1879
    Athenaeum

    English instruction will be given at the Athenaeum, 50 Dearborn Street, next Monday. The course is available to all Germans who wish to study English--reading, writing, and speaking are taught quickly. The aim is to provide an elementary knowledge of English, so that recent arrivals [from Europe] will find it easier to get a job.

    Men and women of any age are eligible.

    English instruction will be given at the Athenaeum, 50 Dearborn Street, next Monday. The course is available to all Germans who wish to study English--reading, writing, and speaking are taught ...

    German
    I A 3
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- April 11, 1880
    Education

    All the readers of the Arbeiter Zeitung will be very happy to learn that we are going to erect a school for the purpose of educating immigrant Germans in the ways of U. S. A. The name for the school is "Chicago Athenaum, 48-54 S. Dearborn Street. The students will learn the English language, algebra, writing and bookkeeping, and the tuition will be very low so that everybody can benefit by the school.- Professor A. Grath will be the leader.

    The Comrades will recommend the school, and it will mean so much for the newcomer to learn the English language correctly. The next term of school will start April 12th. The classes are held in the evening so that everybody may attend.

    All the readers of the Arbeiter Zeitung will be very happy to learn that we are going to erect a school for the purpose of educating immigrant Germans in the ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III G, III A, I A 3
  • Svornost -- November 16, 1881
    Free Teaching of English

    A few days ago we brought the information that our countryman, Mr. Jos. F. Kohout, was made a teacher in the City evening school, located in the Foster school building on Union St. So far as we know, English was taught previously by an Irishman, and in his classes were many Bohemians. These, however, practically all stopped attending the school, for that which he taught was anything else but English.

    We hope that everything will change now, and that all those who formerly attended the school will return and with them many new pupils. All those who wish to enroll in the class are urged to report to the principal of the school, and tell him that they are Bohemians and they will be assigned to the class which is under the supervision of Mr. J.F. Kohout.

    Especially our youth who do not know the English language would do well to attend, for they not only would benefit but would serve to advance Bohemian things in general.

    2

    If Bohemians let it be known that they wish to learn English, a different attitude would be taken toward them in regards to their school matters.

    We shall expect that this little hint will be sufficient and that Mr. Kohout's class will be advantageous and successful.

    A few days ago we brought the information that our countryman, Mr. Jos. F. Kohout, was made a teacher in the City evening school, located in the Foster school building ...

    Bohemian
    I A 3, III A
  • Svornost -- February 08, 1884
    Sunday and Saturday School

    Yesterday there was opened a new Sunday and Saturday school at 46 Bunker St., in the building of Matica Skolska (Alma Mater). The new school is for the Bohemian children, especially for children who on week days go to the English public schools. The Alma Mater is conducting the school. The purpose of this school is to teach all children of local Bohemian parents to speak, read and write their mother language. The knowledge of the mother tongue will ennoble every Bohemian child and every adult. We are following the example of the Germans, who are giving close attention to the instruction of their children in good English and in the ancestral language too. The Germans know that this is the only way to preserve the German nationality, thus protecting their children against denationalization. In this regard we must imitate them.

    2

    Now we have the most favorable opportunity to do it. The Alma Mater makes for this purpose new sacrifices and our duty should be to see that Bohemian parents take advantage of this opportunity and send their children to this new school. It is absolutely necessary that the American citizen know the English language, but would a Bohemian be a real Bohemian who did not know the mother tongue and the history of his celebrated ancestors? Would we call a real Bohemian a man who would be confused, listening to an educated man speaking of the history of our famed Bohemia? Such a one would be an absolute nonentity in the community. Such a youth would become a so-called "dude"; in his foolish superiority he would not care to speak Bohemian, being ashamed of the language and would not be worthy of the notice by anyone. We have many individuals of this kind among our growing youths. It is the noble task of our schools to stop the increase of this element.

    3

    Bohemian parents should take notice; every true Bohemian must care whether his children know their ancestral tongue. We hopefully expect that a large number of children will be registered in the school.

    Next Sunday a school for young men will be started in the same building. We urge especially those young men to attend who in previous years had no opportunity to gain some education, and being now occupied through the week, are unable to acquire a spiritual education. And what is a workingman without spiritual education? A mere machine, a slave of his employer, possessing not enough power to act freely toward his own progress.

    The Alma Mater is about the only society which has taken extensive care of the Bohemian, being unsparing in its sacrifice to teach Bohemian 4children to speak, read and write their mother tongue so that in the future they may be the real representatives of their ancestral country - likewise, good citizens of our adopted country.

    The success of this noble work rests now on the shoulders of Bohemian parents, who should lend a helpful hand and send their children to this school.

    Yesterday there was opened a new Sunday and Saturday school at 46 Bunker St., in the building of Matica Skolska (Alma Mater). The new school is for the Bohemian children, ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, I A 3, I A 1 a, III A, I C
  • L'italia -- January 25, 1890
    "Schools"

    Mr. M. Nardi will help the Italian families of Clark St. He opened a school at 505 S. Clark St. at his own expense, for both young and adults. Mr. Nardi has offered this free to the Italian people of that community. Mr. Nardi has two schools opened on his expense. The other school is at 17 W. Kinzie St. Because he is teaching at the school on Kinzie St. he cannot be at the school on Clark St. Therefore he is asking any Italian who is willing to do the teaching gratis to contribute his services.

    These schools are also opened on Saturdays and Sundays, and are used as a library. Any one who wishes to attend may do so free of charge. There are newspapers, magazines, romances and other books for people to read.

    There are also American families living among the poorest Italian families of the West Side, and are doing their utmost to help them. We 2should thank them for their most appreciated help.

    With the help of Mr. Mastrovalerio, Italian teachers are teaching in evening schools, English to our Italians. Mr. Mastrovalerio is trying his best in getting more Italian teachers for evening schools, because there are an immense number of Italians enlisting in evening schools to learn English.

    Mr. M. Nardi will help the Italian families of Clark St. He opened a school at 505 S. Clark St. at his own expense, for both young and adults. Mr. ...

    Italian
    II B 2 f, I C, I A 3
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 30, 1890
    [Passes Pharmacists Examination]

    A Pharmacist's Examination was passed a little over a week ago by our countryman, Charles H. Grund, who came here from Karlstad, Sweden, slightly more than a year ago. Of course, Mr. Grund knew all about drugs before he came to America, having studied and worked in Karlstad and Stockholm, but to pass before the Board of Pharmacy after only one year's residence here is a rather remarkable record.

    A Pharmacist's Examination was passed a little over a week ago by our countryman, Charles H. Grund, who came here from Karlstad, Sweden, slightly more than a year ago. Of ...

    Swedish
    I A 3, II A 1