The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 15, 1886
    German-American Professorship.

    The Archbishop Michael Heiss of Milwaukee invites, in an enthusiastic petition, the Catholic-Americans of German origin to become actively interested in the Catholic University that is to be founded in Washington. He proposes, in his character as member of the Board of Directors, that German-American Catholics should provide the means to establish three German professorships at the University, namely a St. Bonivacius professorship in theology, a Goerres professorship in philosophy and a Windhorst professorship in jurisprudence. The foundation of the first clerical chair would require a capital of $50,000 and each of the other professorships would be $100,000. Such abundant German donations should also secure a proper representative of the Germans on the Board of Directors, forever.

    Archbishop Heiss turns for the above purpose, at the first, to the many wealthy among the German-American Catholics and says: "We want to enter this Spring into the almanac of the Catholic University one-hundred Germans' names who have each paid $1,000 and a thousand Germans' names that represent each a gift of $100. We all are witnesses that God has blessed many more than 1,100 German Catholics with sufficient earthly possessions; and that 2no nation does more for instruction and education than has the German is proved by history. Let us do our share, so that also the Catholic University of America gives evidence of this."

    Also for non-Catholics it is very desirable that the purpose of the Archbishop be carried out, for such German professorships would of course contribute very much to the maintenance of German nationality within and outside the Catholic Church of this country.....

    The Archbishop Michael Heiss of Milwaukee invites, in an enthusiastic petition, the Catholic-Americans of German origin to become actively interested in the Catholic University that is to be founded in ...

    German
    I A 2 d
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 10, 1893
    A Lutheran College

    The Lutheran Synod held a meeting yesterday regarding the erection of a college.

    A Mr. J.P. Badem promised a donation of $50,000 providing the institute be called St. John's Lutheran College; $30,000 to be used for the building and furnishings, and $10,000 for annual maintenance.

    The Lutheran Synod held a meeting yesterday regarding the erection of a college. A Mr. J.P. Badem promised a donation of $50,000 providing the institute be called St. John's Lutheran ...

    German
    I A 2 a, III C, I A 2 d
  • Sinai Congregation, Letter Book -- June 26, 1894
    (No headline)

    Dr. Isaac M. Wise, President

    Hebrew Union College

    Dear Sir:

    Your favor of the 22 inst. to J. L. Gatzert, president of Chicago Sinai Congregation, reporting that Messrs. Morris Newfeld and Simon Peiser have carried on their studies for the year 1893-4 to the full satisfaction of the faculty of Hebrew Union College and the University, was laid before the Executive Board of the congregation last evening and thereupon it was resolved that we donate a like sum as last year payable in like manner for the use of Messrs. Newfeld and Peiser as stipendiary students of the Hebrew Union College.

    Yours Truly

    A. Benswanger, Secretary.

    Dr. Isaac M. Wise, President Hebrew Union College Dear Sir: Your favor of the 22 inst. to J. L. Gatzert, president of Chicago Sinai Congregation, reporting that Messrs. Morris Newfeld ...

    Jewish
    I A 2 d
  • Narod Polski -- September 27, 1900
    Student's Aid Society

    This society has the purpose of promoting by word and deed the benefits of a higher education for Polish youth.

    It is urged particularly that the high education of Poles be gained in Polish institutions, wherever they exist.

    By word and pen the society will remind the Poles of this patriotic duty, to guide the parents who become negligent in this respect.

    Since the St. Stanislaus' College at Chicago is an institution of high learning, which with regard to results compares favorably with the American institutions of the same standing, it has the right to issue diplomas; for the reason the Students' Aid Society decided to pay special attention to St. Stanislaus College.

    The Society believes in its holy mission, and at the same time expects, that there is not a Pole who does not approve of the Society's purpose.

    2

    The society tries to interest all classes of the Polish communities with the wish that every Polish patriot, without exception, however poor he may be, will, must and may become a member of the said society.

    For that reason a minimum fee of $1.20 per annum was agreed upon (30 quarterly) which amount is sufficient for one to become a member of this society.

    Of course each patriotic member is allowed to make bigger contributions, if he wants to, so that the funds may grow.

    We apply in person or by letter to the sec'y: Kazimerz Neuman, 143 W. Division St. Chicago, Ill.

    The society thinks it is doing a patriotic duty by following the outlined program of education and high learning for the Polish youth on which their future depends.

    Although it was organized only four weeks ago the society has 76 members, among them the 76 years old historian and patriot, Zygmunt Milkowski, who is of the opinion that the Poles in the U. S. never will loose their warm and sincere love for their fatherland.

    3

    The society expects that Poles, not only in Chicago but wherever they live in U. S. will join this society.

    If these expectations are fulfilled, and the good results of our work begin to show then we may report to our brethren in our dear fatherland:

    "We watch and we will be ready." Chicago in September 1900.

    Wiktor Bardonski, Pres.

    Karol Macher, Vice-Pres.

    Kazimierz Neuman, Sec'y.

    Andrzej Kwasigroch, Treasurer

    This society has the purpose of promoting by word and deed the benefits of a higher education for Polish youth. It is urged particularly that the high education of Poles ...

    Polish
    III B 2, IV, III H, III A, I A 2 d, I A 1 d, II B 2 f
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 08, 1901
    Expression of Thanks

    p.11..................From Bethany College latest Director's meeting we have the following: Dr. Swensson reported the following donation from the Hon. C. A. Smith of Minneapolis, Minnesota, twenty-five million feet of lumber on the root from Mr. Smith's timber lands in Oregon. This lumber is not to sell for less than $25,000., with four per cent added, from the date of the expiration of Dr. Pearsons' Endowment Fund until date of sale. The name of the fund created by this gift shall be: "The Charles A. Smith Endowment to the President's Chair of Bethany college."

    The donation has a conditional clause namely: that Bethany College is to remain always under Lutheran control and ownership. The donation places a further condition in stating that it is necessary for the college to raise $75,000.00 in order to acquire the $25,000.00 by Dr. D.K.Pearsons of Chicago.

    2

    The following resolutions of gratitute were unanimously adopted:

    "Whereas the Hon. C.A.Smith has continually befriended Bethany College in many and valuable ways ever since the college was founded.

    Whereas, the Board has received official information that Mr. C.A.Smith has donated twenty-five million feet of lumber from his lumber lands in Oregon, said gift to be known as the Charles A. Smith Endowment to the President's Chair of Bethany College and said gift not to be disposed of for less than $25,000.00, therefore:

    Resolved: That the Board of Directors hereby extend to the Hon. C. A. Smith their most sincere gratitude and appreciation of this munificent donation, expressing at the same time their wish and prayer that the blessing of Almighty God, the God of our Sainted Lutheran fathers, may continue to rest upon the kind donor, his family and his business.

    3

    Resolved: That the Board hopes that the splendid example of Mrs. Smith's benevolence may induce others to do likewise, in order that our dear college may be safely and fully endowed as soon as possible.

    Resolved: That these resolutions be entered in the minutes of the body, and that they are given to the press for publication. The secretary is also instructed to send a copy to the Hon. C. A. Smith at Minneapolis, Minnesota.

    Dr. Swensson announced the subscription of $1,000.000 by Mr. J. E. Norling of Chicago who is the largest stockholder of Svenska Tribune and Fosterlandet.

    Resolved: That the Board learns with gratitude and satisfaction of Mr. Norling's subscription of $1,000.000 to our Endowment Fund, and hereby express their thanks to the kind donor."

    p.11..................From Bethany College latest Director's meeting we have the following: Dr. Swensson reported the following donation from the Hon. C. A. Smith of Minneapolis, Minnesota, twenty-five million feet of lumber ...

    Swedish
    I A 2 d, III A, III C, II C, I A 3
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 15, 1901
    Swedish Culture in North America

    In the United States there are at present two million people who still speak Swedish. It should be close to the hearts of all friends of the native land to strengthen the sense of unity these immigrants have for the homeland--for its culture and language. Although these people have found a new fatherland in the United States, they are not, however, entirely lost to Sweden as long as they speak the Swedish language and interest themselves in the homeland's destiny. To preserve and strengthen this unity is to make Sweden greater and richer in sons. It is, likewise, winning a new land for Swedish culture.

    While year after year an average of five to six million dollars is sent over to Sweden, hardly anything is done for those of our countrymen here who are in need of help, in spite of the fact that there are one half as many Swedes in America as there are in the homeland. But what we failed to do, they have done. Without our help they have worked, struggled, and 2pressed forward.

    Although they immigrate from Sweden usually with empty hands, the Swedes nearly always become good and useful citizens of their adopted land, and quite a few of them have attained respected stations in life. With their own means they have built Swedish schools, some of which are almost on the level of universities. To the best of their ability, they have sought to strengthen the love for Sweden's language and culture.

    But how much more vigorous this love would be if they knew that those in the homeland understood and assisted in promoting these endeavors? It is in regard to this that we now appeal to the Swedish public.

    In 1860 the Swedes in America established a school which grew to be their finest seat of learning. This school, the Augustana College and Theological Seminary, Rock Island, Illinois, has exerted a powerful influence over the 3Swedish-Americans, and it has been the noblest hearth for the preservation of Swedish in a land far from Sweden. The majority of the teachers in Augustana College received their training in Sweden.

    At first the College's purpose was to train men for the ministry in order to meet the ever-growing demand for clergymen brought about by the influx of Swedish immigrants into the United States. After the shortage of ministers had been taken care of, the institution became of a more general type. New branches and higher courses have been included in the curriculum, and one dares hope now that the institution will develop into a real university.

    However, to collect the funds which are needed for this purpose requires energy and effort, as well as the impulse to start it. But from where shall this impulse come?

    4

    Would it not be most proper that the impulse should come from the old fatherland, which would thus prove that it has not forgotten those in America who have preserved their love for Sweden, its language, and its culture?

    Certainly, nothing could tighten better the common tie between the old and the new Sweden than a contribution from Sweden for the Swedish-American College. Such attitude on the part of the homeland would be invaluable to the preservation of the Swedish language abroad.

    Indications are that the solution to the problem is at hand. A movement has been started in Sweden to raise an endowment fund of 100,000 crowns. This is to be supplemented by a fund of $60,000. to be raised in America. With this fund three professorships will be created at Augustana College.

    One of the professorships should be in Natural Science, in recognition of the services of Linnaeus and Berzelius; another in Church History, 5and a third in Scandinavian Languages, with special emphasis on Swedish. The last mentioned professorship is to be called the "Oscar II Professorship in Northern Languages." This arrangement would strongly emphasize the Swedish character of the university and permanently serve to strengthen the ties between the new homeland and the old.

    The initiative for this movement in Sweden was taken by a number of Sweden's foremost leaders in various branches of cultural development.

    In the United States there are at present two million people who still speak Swedish. It should be close to the hearts of all friends of the native land to ...

    Swedish
    I A 2 d, III H, III G, III C, III A, V A 2, I A 1 b, II B 2 f
  • Lietuva -- October 30, 1908
    Ausra Society to Give Four Lectures

    The Ausra Society has completed plans and arrangements to give four lectures this fall for the Lithuanians of Chicago. The purpose of these lectures, as we all know, is to promote the intellectual development of our people.

    The Ausra Society, a student's aid and general educational society, has been giving lectures to the Lithuanians of Chicago during the past two years. An effort is always being made to secure the most educated Lithuanians to deliver the lectures. There can be no doubt that our people have received much benefit from these lectures, because they have dealt with the most important matters pertaining to the daily life of Lithuanians.

    It is not true that the Ausra Society is interested in promoting partisan ideals, as had been stated by a member in an article published in the Katalikas (The Catholic, a weekly Lithuanian newspaper published in Chicago). The society is interested only in the welfare and intellectual development of our people and is working only in that direction. All Lithuanians, regardless of political or religious affiliations 2, are accepted into the membership of the society. A priest, a lawyer, a socialist, or even an anarchist can become a member of the society providing he or she pledge to adhere to the principles of the society: to promote the welfare and intellectual uplift of our people, and to refrain from all efforts to divide our people into partisan and religious factions.

    In accordance with the aims of the Ausra Society, arrangements have been made to give the following four lectures this fall:

    1) "The Value of Education," to be delivered by J. J. Gertmanavicius, Nov. 15, at the University Settlement Hall, 4630 Gross Ave. He will review in a general manner all the branches of learning.

    2) "Is Society Necessary to Mankind?", to be delivered by A. Zagaras, Nov. 29, at the University Settlement Hall, 4630 Gross Ave.

    3) "The Moral Code of Anarchism," according to the writings of Kropotkin, to 3be delivered by J. Laukis, Dec. 13, at the Ridikas Hall, on Illinois St., in the rear of the Lietuva building (3252 So. Halsted St.)

    4) "Ethical Culture," to be delivered by J. Sernas (Joseph Adomaitis), Dec. 27, also at the Ridikas Hall, on Illinois St.

    The Ausra Society has completed plans and arrangements to give four lectures this fall for the Lithuanians of Chicago. The purpose of these lectures, as we all know, is to ...

    Lithuanian
    III B 2, IV, I A 2 d, I A 1 d, II B 1 d, II B 2 g
  • Skandinaven -- October 03, 1911
    Luther College

    In view of the struggle that marked the beginning of Luther College and the subsequent struggle to keep it going, it is of interest to all of us to know more about the College. At the fiftieth anniversary celebration of the College, Professor Ludvig Hektoen, of the University of Chicago, spoke as follows:

    "As the representative of the Alumni Association of Luther College, I bring a message of jubilant congratulations from the alumni to the Alma Mater on this auspicious celebration of its fiftieth anniversary, and on the significant step completed this day toward making her foundations more secure. I bring a message of deep gratitude to the donors of the endowment fund, and one of sincere satisfaction in the part taken by fellow alumni in raising this fund!

    "I know that the sentiments of the alumni of Luther College are interpreted correctly when I say that we look upon this fund and the manner in which it was created as the most sincere endorsement, by friends far and near, of the College and its work. For do not the friend of the College hereby attest that it 2has fulfilled its functions in the years gone by, that it has been a faithful agency of high purpose, that it has impressed them with this aim, that it has been loyal to the welfare of its students and to high standards of character and efficiency?....

    "If one were to ask, What are the special elements that give to this College such recognized strength and such promise of great value for the future that it has received a permanent endowment? different answers would be made depending on different points of view. In addition to the character of the student body of the College, and to the earnestness and inspiring devotion of the faculty, I regard it of the greatest importance to its progress that there has been no uncertainty as to its purpose.

    "Luther College was founded and is maintained 'in order to provide a liberal and thorough education for young men who intend to enter the service of the church,' but it has not avoided the responsibilities and duties placed upon it with respect to those students who for various reasons select other vocations.

    3

    'It welcomes any youth who desires to avail himself of its advantages.' The aim has been to give a broad, scholarly training and to develop moral strength and character in all its students, this being regarded as the best preparation for their life work, whatever its nature may be. It has placed character above intellectual attainment, and it has held fast to thorough and scholarly courses of study. This steady pursuit of what always must be the enduring ideals in education has created an atmosphere or spirit which guides the students and influences all who come into relation with the College, giving it stability and strength and reflecting itself in the character of its graduates.

    "As one of the results of this steady pursuit of its clearly defined purpose, this college from its beginning has been a faithful and powerful agency in preparing us to take a worthy part in the building of this country and its civilization, in preserving in our race in America its peculiar and desirable qualities, and in preventing an untimely submergence with loss of identity and influence in the great melting pot into which we have been thrown. That Luther College has been consistently loyal to the common welfare from this point of view should appeal with peculiar force to Norwegians everywhere; that it has not 4failed of appreciation by men of light and leaders outside of our own ranks, as illustrated by Mr. Hill's generous gift, is worthy of special emphasis.

    "It is natural that we, as grateful alumni, rejoice that an endowment fund has been established. The College will be better able to provide adequate opportunities for its teachers whose task of awakening and properly developing the possibilities that slumber in youth requires thorough training, clear vision, and competent scholarship. We must not lose sight of the obligation that rests on colleges to do what they can to promote the growth of knowledge. They do this best if their teachers are able to detect early those students who are endowed with the instinct for a life of quiet and continuous study, who have talent for research, and are able by proper methods to lead them on to do the work for which they are specially fitted in order that the torch may be placed in hands fit to carry it forward.

    "We alumni rejoice also because this fund comes not only as the result, but also as a reward for the thorough, faithful, and unassuming performance of duty that has marked the work of the faculty of Luther College since its establishment.

    5

    May the example and inspiration of duty thus performed ever continue in the College.

    "The developments at Luther College are not to stop with the completion of this endowment fund. Further growth and expansion in various directions are destined to follow.

    "No matter how satisfactory and admirable the courses of instruction may seem at present, they cannot remain fixed and unchangeable. Modifications, readjustments, and additions must be made from time to time. These are steps that require careful planning and deliberation. While there is danger in becoming so wedded to the traditions of the past as not to grasp the realities of the present, there is danger also in mistaking mere alteration and novelty for progress. 'All true development and progress are out of and because of what has gone before'. On the basis of this consideration, I venture to mention, as an example of the needs of the College, that for some time it has seemed to me and no doubt to many others that general biology should be represented just as chemistry and physics have been for many years. Whatever the future career of the student 6may be, a well-planned and thorough introduction to biology will be of interest and advantage in giving him a clearer insight into the practical significance of the developments in the science which includes both physiology and medicine. A knowledge of the fundamental facts of biology would be of particular value to clergymen and teachers in dealing with the problems of health that come up for consideration in their daily work. It would aid also in driving our quackery and humbug, which, I regret to say, succeeded long ago, in fastening their evils on our countrymen. At present the situation at Luther College, so far as concerns the natural sciences, offers an inviting opportunity for the donation of funds for buildings, equipment, and endowment.

    "On days such as this, the past seems near; the dust of the passing years is blown away, and we see clearly, more clearly than before, the large significance of the services of the founders of the College, of its many supporters from pioneer days down to the present moment, of the members of its faculty, and of its first president, faithful, venerable, revered by all and beloved by those who have come under his immediate influence. The influence of their work and of their aspirations continues because of their loyalty to a high aim, because of the 7living faith in them, and because of their unaltering faithfulness to the highest ideals of conduct and to high standards of scholarship even in the days of small things. Small things? Yes, in some ways, perhaps, and according to certain criteria, but in other ways those were days of great things because the founding of this College fifty years ago, and the successful conduct of the institution since then or meager resources, but with steadily increasing influence and without the sacrifice of a single fundamental principle, constitute an achievement of the largest significance by Norwegians in America.

    "I feel confident that I voice the sentiments and hopes of all the alumni of Luther College when I urge upon its friends to see to it that nothing is done that will tend to restrict or divide the natural field of its usefulness and its sources of support, but to continue in firm and genuine unity to increase its educational facilities and resources in order that it may serve its purposes in still larger measure.

    "And finally a word to those in whose hands rest the future of many hopes. Students of Luther College! As you stand at the foot of the long hill, amid the glorious tints of the morning, before the dew of youth has dried off, eager 8for the journey to proceed, we who have gone before you, and are now looking back, salute you! Aided by vigorous physical health, may you feel that clear, keen joy in your work which drive away the shadows of annoyance and langour. Live neither too much in the past nor in the future, but let each day's work of your college years satisfy your widest ambitions and absorb all your energies. For your very admission to this College....demands of you now that you develop and organize your resources of spirit and mind into the effective service of high aims."

    Professor Preus received a letter a few days ago from Mrs. Brunsdal, with a check for $10,000 for the endowment fund. Mrs. Brunsdal has two sons attending Luther College.

    In view of the struggle that marked the beginning of Luther College and the subsequent struggle to keep it going, it is of interest to all of us to know ...

    Norwegian
    I A 2 a, I A 2 d
  • Scandia -- November 18, 1911
    [Five Thousand Dollars Donated to Lutheran College Endowment Fund

    Mr. Hauman G. Haugan, who donated a considerable sum last year to finance the summer vacation for boys of the Christiania Orphanage, has again shown his generosity and bigheartedness. He recently donated five thousand dollars to the Lutheran College endowment fund, the largest individual sum given. Professor [H. G.] Stub, of the school, has, during the past fifteen months traveled, all over the United States on a one-man campaign to raise a fund of two hundred thousand dollars as an endowment. This task was undertaken by Professor H. G. Stub in answer to a challenge by J. J. Hill, of railroad fame, who promised to donate fifty thousand dollars to the fund if the Lutheran Church would raise two hundred thousand dollars. The optimism, courage, and unflagging zeal of the professor has carried him over the top; he has not only raised the amount set but an additional thirty-six thousand dollars, which will be used to pay the debt of the Church. The endowment fund of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars (including J. J. Hill's fifty 2 thousand dollars), will be invested so as to bring an annual income of twelve thousand five hundred dollars, to be used for a College extension program, remodeling refurnishing, etc. In raising this vast sum singlehandedly, the valiant professor has completed a gigantic task worthy of a dozen good men, and Norwegian America owes him a debt of gratitude which it can never repay. Words fail us--we can only say, "Thank you and well done".

    We cannot, in justice, dismiss Mr. Haugan with the simple mention of his donation. This grand friend is a typical Norseman, energetic, a deep thinker, a man with a vision and the heart to bring about the realization of the vision. Any worthy cause can depend upon the help of this outstanding member of our Chicago Norwegian-American colony.

    Mr. Hauman G. Haugan, who donated a considerable sum last year to finance the summer vacation for boys of the Christiania Orphanage, has again shown his generosity and bigheartedness. He ...

    Norwegian
    I A 2 d, IV
  • Skandinaven -- June 11, 1912
    The United Church

    The following letter was sent to James J. Hill by the secretary of the United Lutheran Church:

    "Honored Sir: Pursuant to a resolution passed by the United Norwegian Church of America at its recent annual convention, I hereby take great pleasure in offering to you the most grateful acknowledgment of the said Church body for your very kind and liberal offer of $60,000 toward the establishment of a permanent endowment fund for St. Olaf College, on conditions as stipulated in your personal letter to the Reverend H. E. Rasmussen, January 3, 1911. I have also the pleasure of informing you that in strict accordance with the terms of your offer, our Church has inaugurated a general subscription drive for the purpose of raising the required $300,000 for said permanent endowment fund.

    "Again thanking you most cordially on behalf of the said United Church,

    2

    I am

    "Gratefully and sincerely yours,

    "Jens C. Roseland

    "Secretary of the United Norwegian Lutheran Church of America."

    The following letter was sent to James J. Hill by the secretary of the United Lutheran Church: "Honored Sir: Pursuant to a resolution passed by the United Norwegian Church of ...

    Norwegian
    III C, IV, I A 2 d