The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 19, 1875
    German-American Catholics (Editorial)

    The Catholic Wahrheitsfreund, (Friend of the Truth), of Cincinnati, once expressed its objection to the agitation carried on by Catholic fanatics; at least that paper definitely condemned the requests of those apostles who demanded certain divisions of the school fund. And the paper reiterates its opinion now, although lately Archbishop Purcell of Cincinnati, in his organ, the Catholic Telegraph, has been renewing the demands for school funds with determined insistence, invoking the authority of the Syllabus. [Translator's note: Syllabus; A document issued by Pope Pius IX, December 8, 1864, condemning eighty current doctrines of the age as heresies.]

    [Translator's note: The omitted paragraphs consist of an excerpt taken from the Wahrheitsfreund, and comments thereon.] 2Nevertheless the conduct of the Wahrheitsfreund; its opposition to Catholic agitators and disturbers, deserves recognition. The paper undoubtedly acts in conformance with the attitude of the tremendous majority of German Catholics in the United States, at least, surely, in accordance with that of practically all German Catholics in Chicago, and everyone who is at all familiar with conditions here will concede that the Chicago German Catholics are, completely tolerant and loyal to the country of their adoption.

    Any attempt to undermine the interdenominational peace among local Germans would prove farcical. And the new generation of German Catholic is fully steeped in the true, American form of tolerance; the absolute equality of all religious denominations.

    The Catholic Wahrheitsfreund, (Friend of the Truth), of Cincinnati, once expressed its objection to the agitation carried on by Catholic fanatics; at least that paper definitely condemned the requests of ...

    German
    I A 1 c, I C, III C, I A 2 a
  • Svornost -- January 22, 1880
    Equal Obligations, Equal Rights Sign the Petition Bohemian in the Public School

    The decisive step has been taken and if it were not for the cursed indifference and sluggishness among us, we could know before tomorrow morning what kind of reception was given to our petition to the School Board, in regard to the teaching of the Bohemian Language in our Public Schools.

    It is to be regretted that, in view of very great importance of this matter, the personal interest of the greater portion of our countrymen remains unprecedentedly cold and indifferent. There is, no doubt, but that it was for this reason that the meeting which was held last night, in the interest of this generally known cause, was so little attended.

    The meeting was opened and presided over by Citizen Leo Meilbek. After the explanation of the purposes of this meeting, namely the selection of a committee for the securing of signatures to the petition. Mr. M. Baumruker gave a brief talk, pointing out the usefulness and benefits to be derived from the teaching of the Bohemian Language in the Public Schools, 2describing the convenience of the present time for the accomplishment of this purpose.

    "Let us give some thought to the Bohemian English (Liberal) School, even though it is sufficient for our purpose, still no one can deny that if the Bohemian Language were taught in the Public Schools it would be of great benefit to us for in the former, English is not studied so well as in the latter, and after all, English is the chief language here."

    Many bitter truths were spoken by our esteemed friend and all those present admit that he was right. It was brought out that some of our countrymen were opposed to the teaching of the Bohemian Language in the Public Schools, fearing that they would be forced to pay additional taxes for that purpose. To be sure they are very much mistaken. The appointment of an instructor of the Bohemian Language in the Public Schools will cause no increase in the tax levy upon Bohemians, because the estimated needs for school purposes are spread upon the entire city and each one is required to pay a certain sum, whether they have one, two, five or no teachers whatever and whether or not they send their children to school.

    3

    Supposing that the taxes were really increased because of this appointment of a Bohemian Teacher, who would receive about $600.00 yearly, how much increase would fall upon each citizen of the community, surely not over one cent before the entire amount would be made up. Let no one be frightened about this matter; the teaching of the Bohemian Language can be introduced into the school system without any additional outlay or expense to us. Let the parents who have children attending the Throop school sign the petition when it is presented to them and secure the signatures of their neighbors.

    The petition which was made public last Monday was to have been delivered to the School Board today, but owing to the lack of a sufficiently large number of signatures the presentation is postponed for two weeks.

    The committee appointed for the securing of signatures is as follows: Jan Poustecky and J. Sedlacek.

    Once more we wholeheartedly urge all our countrymen who have children attending the Throop School to see to it that the petition for the teaching of Bohemian have as many signatures as it is possible to get.

    The decisive step has been taken and if it were not for the cursed indifference and sluggishness among us, we could know before tomorrow morning what kind of reception was ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 b, III C, I A 1 c, II B 2 f
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 03, 1892
    Confusing Public Schools with Church Schools

    Archbishop Ireland of St. Paul, has repeatedly expressed himself more or less pointedly in favor of turning over the Catholic church schools to the state or changing them into public schools. This has reference to the famous Faribault Plan, which is named after the country town Faribault, in which the plan originated. It was also introduced in another Minnesota town near St. Paul.

    In accordance with this plan the Catholics turned over their church schools to the state to be used as public schools. The school board then agrees to engage catholic nuns as teachers in these schools. The teachers are required not to give any religious instruction during school hours, but to restrict the same to children of Catholics after regular hours.

    This is the agreement. Children of Protestants and other non-Catholics attended these schools. But among these parents utmost discontent prevails lately and they make the following complaint: The teachers daily instructed the children during the noon hour in the Catholic catechism and attempts were made to force non-Catholic children to participate. The non-Catholic population became so excited that plans were supposed to have been made to engage militia for the

    Archbishop Ireland of St. Paul, has repeatedly expressed himself more or less pointedly in favor of turning over the Catholic church schools to the state or changing them into public ...

    German
    I A 2 a, I A 1 c, I C, I A 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 27, 1892
    Altgeld's Masterful Interpretation of the Parochial School Question

    Altgeld has expressed his sentiments about that torrid election question which now holds sway in Illinois. His remarks at the time of his nomination and subsequent speeches have now been amplified as well as perfected by the addition of necessary detail. We quote, without omission, and have conscientiously translated it into German. In its direct, compelling logic and understandable, progressive attitude, it represents a veritable arsenal of efficient weapons with which the "Know-nothingism" and the Republican Fiferism can be combatted.

    "Like the Democrats, I am in favor of compulsory school attendance. Likewise, I desire that every child shall have a certain, definite education and that schooling shall be at state expense, if it is not otherwise provided for.

    The public schools of the state shall be under state supervision, and no sectarian religious beliefs shall be taught there, so that no particular creeds may be implante into the easily susceptible minds of school children.

    The state-schools have been created, to take care of all those children, whose 2parents or guardians refrain from sending them to private schools.

    There was a period during the history of the world, when no common public schools existed. Whoever wanted to learn something had to hire an individual teacher or pay for it in an exclusive school. But in the course of time, the well directed, amply state financial public schools, particularly the elementary and grammar classes, have supplanted the private institutions.

    But the parochial school, with its church connection, survived. When such a school was founded, the church provided worldly and religious instruction, both from the same instructor. The parochial schools of the various denominations are a part of their respective churches, just as the Sunday School is a division of the English-American Protestant church. We have no right to interfere. The principle on which our public school system has been built, does not contain any paragraph, which authorizes the state to compel people to accept this system, if they do not desire it and are providing instruction for their children elsewhere. The public school is here to cope with the problem of insufficient schools, but not to abolish parental control and choice in regard to their offspring's education.

    Like the Democrats, as aforesaid, I am for compulsory school attendance. It cannot be tolerated that a person shall grow up in ignorance but the state has no right 3whatever to meddle with parents who obtain an education for their progeny.

    The state shall regard the curriculum of a parochial school as sufficient and legal, even if it has no supervision over such institutions. The state is no less concerned in the child's welfare than the parents.

    In educational matters, as in other affairs which affect children, parents may err occasionally, but their intentions are good. No one endowed with intelligence will therefore insist, that the state has a right to prescribe to parents the methods they shall use to raise their children or to maintain discipline.

    Supervision over parochial schools is not a state right, because the state does not contribute anything towards them. Only if something ocours there which comes in conflict with the criminal laws may the state intervene. If it becomes evident that such schools teach subjects which are detrimental to the state and the commonweal, or that the scholars are maltreated, then the state would have the right to take steps in order to abolish such conditions, but only then. Even the most inveterate enemies of the parochial schools have never brought such accusations. They admit that from an educational stand point they are good.

    4

    The state does not have the right to inspect parochial schools in order to ascertain if everything proceeds properly. Based on the same right or rather illegality, it should be possible for the state to enter the sanctity of the home, just to be assured that no wrong is committed therein. The state must act on the presumption that where no complaint has been made no misdemeanor exists. Parochial schools must not be inspected by the state when there is no evidence of some infraction. If some unlawful act has been perpetrated in such a school, and someone knows about it, then he should register his complaint. The same is true in regard to maltreatment of minors by their parents or guardians. If certain people, mostly church adherents, take recourse to the parochial, instead of state schools, then they save money for the state. Let as consider this case, the state deliberately drags children who do not belong to a certain congregation into a private school and demands they should be tutored in a certain manner, in short, treats them as if they were in a public school. Thereby the state would become a partner of a parochial school. But, if the state goes to such extremes, then the parochial school which has never asked for a state subvention, would have the right to demand financial assistance, at least to defray the cost of instruction in those branches over which the state exacted control.

    Such payments would not be permissable, since the constitution prohibits recognition 5of any church in state affairs.

    If the state of Illinois would investigate the parochial schools and then fasten the proclamation onto the portals: "Inspected by the State of Illinois and accepted as a school" then the state would recognize the power that lurks behind the school, namely, the church. Inspection of a parochial school by the state is a preliminary step towards recognition of the church by the state. If the state were to pay money towards the maintainance of such a school, then our courts would declare it as unconstitutional. But, as I have shown, it is contrary to the spirit of the constitution to inspect any church-schools.

    In this parochial school question, we hear much about the teaching of foreign languages. In the entire state of Illinois, there is not a single such school, where English is not being taught; all children there obtain an English education. The gibberish, that the parochial schools might bring the English language into oblivion, is silly, and no one considers or believes it seriously. For these very reasons it is entirely uncalled for, that a definite, compulsory, language teaching program should be enforced among parochial schools.

    6

    Among the Germans of this country, we find the reasonable desire, that their children should be able to read and write their parental language. If it were the absolute intention of the state to prevent children from learning the well entrenched German or any other language besides English, then state officials would have to penetrate the innermost family circles where English is often omitted in order to induce children to learn this tongue by imitation, whereby they acquire it from their very infancy.

    The addiction to the German language at home, and its use during teaching hours in the various courses of the parochial schools is resorted to, since teachers and parents know, that this is the only method whereby the student can obtain a thorough knowledge of his mother tongue, aside from the English. But hide or hair, its not a state affair."

    If Altgeld's ideas will bring victory on Nov. 8th, when the Illinois ballot tells the outcome, and we can expect that he emerges victorious, then the first months of the next year will give us a repetition of what transpired in Wisconsin a year ago, Under Gov. Altgeld's influence the new legal administration of Illinois will abolish the Edwards law; his instigation will help in creating a new school-law, which containone of the objectional features of the Edwards mandate and it will give the parochia private, and state schools equality and justice.

    Altgeld has expressed his sentiments about that torrid election question which now holds sway in Illinois. His remarks at the time of his nomination and subsequent speeches have now been ...

    German
    I A 2 a, IV, I A 2 c, I A 1 c, I A 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 02, 1892
    Dividing the School Funds.

    Republican and "Know-Nothing" newspapers accused the Lutherans as well as the Catholics in former years, of striving to get a share of the public school fund for their parochial schools.

    This reproach has practically ceased, as far as the Lutherans are concerned, but continues against the Catholics. It is regrettable that, once in a while, a fanatical Catholic will make some irresponsible remarks, which will occasion such gossip. However, single and stupid fanatics are not the authorized representatives of the Catholic citizens of this country. A highly esteemed bishop, respected by non-Catholics for his brilliant mind and his tolerant attitude, undoubtedly has the right to speak for his fellow-believers. Recently the Republican politician, Harding, accused the Catholic bishops of Illinois of wanting a majority in the State Legislature in order to divide the public school fund.

    Bishop Spaulding replied in one of the local newspapers:

    "The Catholic bishops of Illinois are not ignorant blockheads. They know very 2well that the State Legislature has no power to divide the public school fund; but they are hoping that a sufficient number of honest and unbiased men will be elected to the State Legislature, to have the unjust and hated Edward Law repealed. This is what we are aiming at, and not at the dividing of the public school fund.

    "Mr. Harding need not worry about the financial burden, which the Catholics bear, due to the maintenance of our parochial schools. In reality our present arrangement is less expensive, than sending our children to public schools. The taxes would have to be greatly increased for all citizens, and, therefore, for us also, if we sent our children to public schools. The increase of expenditures would correspond with the increase in scholars."

    Republican and "Know-Nothing" newspapers accused the Lutherans as well as the Catholics in former years, of striving to get a share of the public school fund for their parochial schools. ...

    German
    I A 1 c, I C, III C, I A 2 a
  • Skandinaven -- January 15, 1893
    [Board of Education Overburdens Taxpayer]

    A. S. Trude attacked the Board of Education for trying to put too great a burden on the Tax Payer by trying to introduce trade classes into the schools "which are absolutely unnecessary". "We the school board are informed that we are spending too much money, it's time to stop all those extra expenses." "I object," said Miss Burk, "Mr. Trude has already overspoken his five minute time." The conference was postponed to the next meeting.

    A. S. Trude attacked the Board of Education for trying to put too great a burden on the Tax Payer by trying to introduce trade classes into the schools "which ...

    Norwegian
    I A 1 c
  • Abendpost -- February 26, 1896
    Pleasing Prospects (Editorial)

    Because the income of the City of Chicago does proportionally decrease from year to year and bonds cannot be issued any more, the City Council resolved to lessen all expenses. At the most it cut down the grants for the public schools, which shall get along with $1,600,000 less than was demanded by the finance committee of the School Board. On account of this, not only all new buildings have to remain undone, although they are planned and absolutely necessary to remedy the overcrowding of many school buildings, but without doubt the attempt will be renewed to eliminate all the "fads" from instruction. As a fad is counted, not only instruction of the German language, but also drawing, gymnastics and singing as qualified branches of teaching only reading, writing and arithmetic will be allowed. This means that the public schools of the City of Chicago shall be suppressed below the average of the very poorest German village schools. Nothing shall be done to develop the body, the eye, and the talent for art. The entire education shall be organized as if all the pupils are to become "Grocery Clerks" in their later life. Individual thinking, manual training, and taste are articles of luxury which the rich city of Chicago must deny to their increasing citizenry.

    Because the income of the City of Chicago does proportionally decrease from year to year and bonds cannot be issued any more, the City Council resolved to lessen all expenses. ...

    German
    I A 1 a, I A 1 c, I A 1 b
  • Abendpost -- March 04, 1896
    The Question of Salaries for Teachers.

    The salary reductions recommended by the Economy Committee of the school board, which had been prevented in January by the opposition of Messrs. Thornton, Brennan etc. will be proposed again on account of the large reduction in the school funds, ordered by the Council. It is expected that the proposal this time will be accepted. The reductions will be made in all salaries in such a way that wages above $2,000 will be cut 10% above $1,000 5% and smaller ones 2 and 21/2%. In that manner a saving of $600,000 may be attained. The old enemies of the special courses, (German, gymnastic, singing and drawing), will take advantage of this favorable opportunity and will propose the elimination of those courses for a temporary period of one year. The budget of the high schools in any case will be reduced very considerably. The administration of the high school in Hyde Park for instance, in the month of February has spent #152 for natural gas in the biological department of the school to keep alive some frogs. The heating of the entire school by coal has not cost much more for this month.

    A number of unemployed have applied for service with the school census. Members of the school board and especially members of the census committee are at present very much worried persons.

    The salary reductions recommended by the Economy Committee of the school board, which had been prevented in January by the opposition of Messrs. Thornton, Brennan etc. will be proposed again ...

    German
    I A 1 a, I A 1 b, I A 1 c
  • Abendpost -- March 23, 1897
    Against Free Schoolbooks

    In the matter of the Schoolbook question, there was held another meeting by the opponents of the free distribution of schoolbooks to the pupils of the Public Schools, in the localities of the Bonifacius community, corner Noble and Cornell Streets. After Reverend Evers called the meeting to order and explained in a few words the object of the meeting, Mr. John Kolle was elected as Chairman, and Mr. Andreas Behrendt as Secretary. The Pastors Netzraeter, Burelbach and Erz, also Mr. Frederick C. Happel made speeches, in which they explained the reasons, why they protested against the position presented at Springfield. Pastor Netzraeter called attention to the fact, that more than half of all the pupils in the public schools are not past the age of elementary classes. The parents of these children, mostly workers and small business men, would have to bear the cost of the schoolbooks, together with the better situated citizens, who are in the position to give their children a higher education.

    2

    In similar vein, spoke Pastor Burelbach, while Mr. Happel, from the fact, that at the present time there is agitation carried on in six different states of the union, in favor of the system, of free distribution of school books, drew the conclusion, that the Schoolbook Trust stands behind this movement. Pastor Erz called it an injustice, that those, who save the State much money, through maintaining Community schools, and in spite of that, participate in the burden of paying a share for the public school expenses, should be taxed for something, which offers them no advantage.

    All those present, signed the protest resolutions, which will be submitted to the State Legislature.

    In the matter of the Schoolbook question, there was held another meeting by the opponents of the free distribution of schoolbooks to the pupils of the Public Schools, in the ...

    German
    I A 1 a, III C, I A 1 c
  • L'italia -- June 09, 1900
    (No headline)

    The Italian Language.

    Mr. E. Durante

    L'Italia Editor

    Dear Sir:

    I have been at your office to confer with you but you were not in. A resolution has been placed before the Board of Education to give the Italians privileges like those they have given to other nationalities. To get these privileges we should have every ones cooperation.

    The Board of Education records show that there is a majority of Italians in the Polk, Jones, and Kinzie Street Schools, which give them the right to form classes of their own, to teach the Italian language to anyone who wishes to learn the language.

    I believe that in a cosmopolitan city like Chicago where our schools are supported by means of general taxes, everyone should be treated alike. By that I 2mean, if it is alright to teach German in Elementary Schools, it is alright to teach Polish, Swedish or Italian as well. These legal rights apply to everyone and they should be enjoyed by everybody in this country. There is no such thing as special privileges for anyone. The Bohemians, Polish, Swedish, and Norwegians are working hard to get these privileges and I would also like to see the Italians receive these privileges.

    We urge all English-speaking Italians to attend the meeting which is to be held by the Board of Education, June 13, regarding this matter. If possible the Board of Education Committee would like to receive a large number of Italians with ready suggestions on how necessary the teaching of a foreign language is. Form a committee and transmit a copy of your suggestions to the Superintendent of the Board of Education, on important facts of the teaching of the Italian language in the Elementary Schools.

    The Board of Education spends $150,000 to $175,000 yearly for the teaching of the German language in the Elementary Schools of this city. Therefore they 3must show some consideration for the Italians and teach their language in the schools where it is needed.

    Sincerely yours

    C. R. Walleck. (A member of the Board of Education Committee)

    Editor's Note:

    Mr. C. R. Walleck, member of the Board of Education Committee, warns the Italians to be powerful and courageous and to fight for their rights. The teaching of their native language is necessary in the Elementary Schools as well as in the High Schools, so that students will not forget their parent's language and will have the advantage of knowing more than one language. Every one in this city is forced to pay taxes, therefore, they should all enjoy equal opportunities. The advantage we are now looking forward to is the teaching of foreign languages. Mr. Walleck also thinks that it is our duty to take advantage of the privileges given us.

    The Board of Education is ready to spend any sum of money for an education, 4but only on condition that the people enjoy such an education as the teaching of the foreign language. Mr. Walleck gave us a list of names and addresses to whom to write for such information. They are as follows: Daniel R. Cameron, 73 Lake St. - Mrs. Caroline K. Sherman, 1538 Monroe St. - Bernard F. Rogers, 154 La Salle - Graham H. Harris, Room 1018, 59 Clark St. - Mrs. Isabelle O'Keefe, 4857 Michigan Ave. - C. R. Walleck, 544 Blue Island Ave. and Joseph Stolz, 157 42nd Place.

    June 13, the committee will hold the great mass meeting to decide this important issue, and on this day the different committees should be present. It is necessary that the Italian Workers Societies should hold a meeting tomorrow to nominate a committee to represent the Italians of this city. We should thank each member of the Board of Education Committee individually and give special thanks to Mr. Walleck for his patience in writing to the L'Italia Editor and for the interest they have shown towards the teaching of the Italian language in the Elementary Schools.

    The Italian Language. Mr. E. Durante L'Italia Editor Dear Sir: I have been at your office to confer with you but you were not in. A resolution has been placed ...

    Italian
    I A 1 b, I C, I A 1 c, II B 2 d 1