The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 22, 1866
    German Citizens Meet to Discuss Instruction in German in Public Schools Official Report of Secretary

    On Wednesday evening, June 20, a meeting was held at Mr. Klein's saloon, corner of Madison and Jefferson Streets, by Germans who live in the Scammon School district. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the introduction of German-language instruction into the public schools of the city. The meeting was very well attended, and there was evidence of great interest in this matter which is of vast interest not only to Germans, but also to Americans.

    Carl Wippo was elected chairman, and Friedrich Kurz was chosen secretary. After Mr. Wippo had opened the meeting, Mr. L. Brentano took the floor. He explained the purpose of the meeting, and pointed out--for the benefit of the Board of Education--that the legal representatives (parents or guardians) of 150 children living in the Scammon School district had demanded that the German-language be placed on the curriculum of the Scammon School. A very spirited 2discussion ensued, in which Colonel Rollshausen, Captain Schoninger, Mr. Kurz, and Friedrich Klein took a prominent part. Thereupon the following resolutions were adopted:

    "A circular explaining the purpose of the meeting shall be sent to the parents and guardians of the German children living in the district, requesting that they inform the superintendent of the Scammon School concerning the number of children each of them sends to that institution, and that they indicate their willingness to comply with the request by signing the circular.

    "The Committee of Seven which was elected at the meeting shall have the duty of compiling a list of the names of all parents and guardians of the district, German as well as American. The members of the Committee are: Friedrich Kurz, C. K. Wippo, W. Droege, Joseph Buechle, Franz Gross, F.H. Rollshausen, and F. Klein.

    "That the unselfish and faithful endeavors of L. Brentano and H. Felsenthal, 3two members of the Chicago Board of Education, who gave unstintingly of their time and talent to attain our object, are gratefully acknowledged."

    The Committee agreed upon the following division of work: Joseph Buechle will solicit signatures from parents living in the area between Lake and Fulton Streets; Mr. Droege will canvass the homes located between Lake and Randolph Streets; Mr. Kurz, between Randolph and Washington Streets; Mr. Wippo, between Washington and Madison Streets; Mr. Rollshausen, between Madison and Monroe Streets; Mr. Gross, between Monroe and Adams Streets; and Mr. Klein, south of Adams Street.

    After the Committee had agreed on the above arrangements the chairman adjourned the meeting until next Wednesday, June 27, when all citizens of the aforementioned district are invited to hear the Committee report, and then to take further steps to accomplish our aim.

    Carl Wippo,

    Johann Kurz.

    On Wednesday evening, June 20, a meeting was held at Mr. Klein's saloon, corner of Madison and Jefferson Streets, by Germans who live in the Scammon School district. The purpose ...

    German
    I A 1 b, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 04, 1867
    Board of Education [Holds Meeting]

    The regular meeting of the Board was held on Tuesday evening. The following members were present: Avery, Ballantyne, Bond, Bonfield, Brentano, Briggs, Clark, Dreier, Foster, Guilford, Leavitt, Runyan; Ryder, and Tinkham. we shall confine our report to the minutes on instruction in the German language.

    Inspector Dreier reported that in 1865 the German language was introduced into the regular curriculum of the Washington School. The results were so gratifying that the Board decided on July 12, 1866 to make instruction in German a part of the curriculums in the wells, Franklin, Moseley, and Newberry schools. One hundred and forty of the high school students took the German course, and of these only fifteen were of German parentage. Many of the pupils of the upper class do reading, spelling, writing, and translating, and most of them are making good progress. Those who lose interest after having received instruction for a specified time are 2transferred to the regular course.

    In the Moseley School, which is attended exclusively by children of American parentage, a hundred and thirty pupils are studying German under Miss McClintock. In the Franklin School, a hundred and fifty pupils are instructed in German by Miss Achort. In the Wells School, Miss Guenther teaches German to a hundred and fifty children. In the Newberry School, Miss Bockme has a hundred and fifty "German" pupils.

    The Board decided that instructors in German are to attend the teachers' institutes and shall constitute a special section under the supervision of the high school teachers. The report was adopted.

    The regular meeting of the Board was held on Tuesday evening. The following members were present: Avery, Ballantyne, Bond, Bonfield, Brentano, Briggs, Clark, Dreier, Foster, Guilford, Leavitt, Runyan; Ryder, and ...

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 02, 1871
    [German Instruction in Public Schools]

    Extensive article about German instruction in public schools. (Mentions another article on the same topic that included statistical material and was "recently" published.)

    German teaching personnel consists of about a dozen women teachers. In St. Louis and Cincinnati number of German teachers three times higher, also number of children taking German considerably larger. In St. Louis German is a special study of the German children- in Chicago the instruction is calculated to profit both German and American children. In St. Louis children are taken into a separate room for German instruction. Children of various grades are divided into German classes according to their knowledge of German. The disadvantage of this system lies in the fact that the German children become separated from their American fellow pupils, and that the American children do not take German. In Chicago, the German teachers alternate from grade to grade, spending half an hour with each class. One Committee for Instruction in German of the Board of Education, wants German instruction to be an essential part of the schools.

    2

    Miss Morch in the Haven School(Wabash near 15, an aristocratic section) teaches German to 425 children of which only 50 are German (15 are "Irish or Colored") Miss Malwina Forster has Kinzie School, Ohio and La Salle, 320 children taking German, less than half of whom are Germans. Miss Anna A. Achert, Franklin School, "Division & Sedgwick Streets, 330; Miss Caroline Mc Fee, Washington School,(Indiana and Sangamon) 303; Marie L. W. Mc Clintock, Moseley School, 24th Street, 350; E. M. von Horn, Wells School, Reuben and Cornelia, 400; E. M. Alfeld, Skinner School, Jackson and Aberdeen, 210 of which all but 15 are Americans. Olivia M. Olson, Cottage Grove, Douglas Place, 118;(none of whom are Germans) Virginia von Horn, Carpenter, 2nd and Center Avenue, 406,(hardly a third German) Amanda Gimbel, LaSalle Primary, North of North Avenue, 450; Mathilde Kaun, Scammon, Madison near Halsted, 400, among them 100 Irish boys and girls.

    These statistics show that the idea of the Committee to win the Americans through their own children for"das Deutsche" (may be translated "The German language") as the German Cause,") has been proven right. The Committee seems to have thought that in the measure in which the German instruction lost its position of separateness may measure the resistance against it will cease. Only in one School (Skinner) one of the teachers is hostile to the German instruction, and his influence 3is so patent that no less than 40 pupils who had begun gave up German.

    German instruction in Chicago is not so well organized as in St. Louis. There one has a German "director" (Superintendent) who stands in the same relationship to the German teachers as the English "directors" to the English teachers. Here in Chicago, the work of the director of the German teachers lies on the hands of the Committee, and the Messrs. Schintz, Richberg and Wunsche are business men who cannot be as efficient as an especially appointed German director.

    Of the 20,000 pupils in Chicago, Public Schools, 3654 take German. A year ago only 1114 did.

    Extensive article about German instruction in public schools. (Mentions another article on the same topic that included statistical material and was "recently" published.) German teaching personnel consists of about a ...

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 04, 1871
    [Lincoln School Needs a Teacher]

    Schintz of the Committee for German Instruction proposes at a Board of Education meeting to appoint a German teacher for the Lincoln School as the parents of 230 pupils have asked for instruction in German.

    Schintz of the Committee for German Instruction proposes at a Board of Education meeting to appoint a German teacher for the Lincoln School as the parents of 230 pupils have ...

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 02, 1871
    [Some Bills Introduced at Springfield]

    Correspondence from Springfield. Senator Woodard introduced into the education committee of both houses a bill proposing that German shall be taught in public schools only when a majority of the pupils demands it. (This measure would only affect Chicago, and perhaps Belleville and Nascoutah in Southern Illinois where German instruction has been introduced. In Chicago the practice exists of introducing German on a motion of the parents of 150 children(formerly only 50), and after such a motion German introduction becomes only optional for the pupils. One of the German members of the Committee strongly opposed Woodard's motion, declared it necessary to introduce German into all the schools and finally moves to leave the decision about German instruction to the school principals. Amendment adopted after long discussion by a 5-4 vote. Question bound to come up again in the Legislature.

    One of the leaders of the Democratic party in the house, Springer, has introduced a bill to exclude German from all the free schools. It throws the hatred of the Democrats against the Germans, the cause of their defeat(in the Civil War). Any teacher of a free school who teaches any subject that is not authorized shall lose his salary. This bill has no chance of being accepted, but is characteristic.

    Correspondence from Springfield. Senator Woodard introduced into the education committee of both houses a bill proposing that German shall be taught in public schools only when a majority of the ...

    German
    I A 1 b, I J, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 21, 1871
    [Anti-German Nativism]

    In its bitter hatred against everything German, the Chicago Times once more attacks German instruction in the public schools.

    English, the Times says, is the language of the country and only this should the young be taught. We simply deny that English is the language of the country. It is one of the languages of the country that is recognized as official because it is the native language of a majority of the inhabitants. And that is all! For more than a million of American citizens German is the native language; for some hundreds of thousands, French; for tens of thousands, Norwegian or Swedish. All these languages have their good right on the side of English. The United States are not a part of England. It is true that in the course of time the numerically weakest nationalities have dissolved into the by far stronger English, but that does not mean that all other nationalities must follow the same course. The Germans at any rate will not do so. Their co-nationals have had a great part in the original settlement of the country; Germans have populated Pennsylvania and the Mohawk Valley possibly before the ancestors of wilbur F. Storey had emigrated from England. If they were all living together in one state, like the Italians in Switzerland in the Canton of Tessin, then even the most hidebound Anglo-Celt would not think of disputing the designation of German as one of the American languages of the 2country.

    The Times says, "When King William would promulgate his decrees in English, and when English would be taught in the public schools in Germany, then the time would have come to teach German in American Schools." The first part of the comparison is improper in so far as nobody demands that the official language of the United States should be Germans. As regards the Second, the Times may be interested to know that in the public schools of the provinces of Posen and of Prussia, Polish is being taught (besides German); and in these of Northern shcloswig, Danish. In Alsatia, for almost a century German was taught under the French rule. That did not prevent the Alsatians from being very good and faithful citizens of French - and so the German speaking Americans will be all the better citizens of the public when their native language is recognized as one of the lawful languages of the country.

    In its bitter hatred against everything German, the Chicago Times once more attacks German instruction in the public schools. English, the Times says, is the language of the country and ...

    German
    I A 1 b, III H, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 26, 1871
    "Deutscher Schulverein Von Chicago."

    A meeting yesterday at the house of the German Society elected Mr. Schutt ita chairman; Mr. Roos, secretary. Mr. Heilmann, who really had brought together the meeting, made a speech in which he explained by an analysis of the aims and purposes of the North American Teachers' Association (the speaker was not a Chicagoan but editor of the paper of this association) what should be the basis of a teachers' or school society. He pointed particularly to three points of the program of the Teachers' Association: 1. Cultivation of the German language, art and literature - 2. Introduction of progressive methods into the American schools - 3. Safeguarding the interests of the German-American teachers.

    What he said about the German-American teachers was particularly worthy of note. He said many of them who have taught in German schools in America for years, are German but not German-American teachers. They are acquainted neither with the language, nor with the history of this country. The German-American school is very different from the German school. To point out only one difference - the relationship to government and religion is quite different 2from Germany, and as it exercises a determining influence on the educational system, the teacher who does not know it is hardly fully qualified for his profession. The speaker then turned to the public schools, - the growth and flourishing of which must be dear to the heart of the German-American teacher, too. It is especially to be desired that the military discipline in those schools be completely abolished, and that a purely rational ethical doctrine be introduced.

    Of course, the speaker finally said, he could not expect that everybody would immediately subscribe to these fundamental principles, but one thing could and should be done - the creation of a society that should work in the direction of these principles.

    Dr. Hansen urged that the society should give itself a broader field to work on by admitting not only teachers, but friends of the school and of public education. In this sense, he moved that the new society should take the name of "German School Society of Chicago."

    3

    The meeting appointed a committee that will prepare the nomination of permanent officials and work out a constitution. We repeat that one of the essential conditions of success is the election of good officials, that one should not name to a committee people who have already done so much dirty work that to do any clean piece of work has become to them a rank impossibility. (Footnote: The Staats Zeitung here is undoubtedly pointing to some pet aversion among the prominent Germans or German teachers).

    Among those present we saw Dr. Chronik, Julius Rosenthal, Dr. Hansen, Lindau, Schaffranek, and others.

    A meeting yesterday at the house of the German Society elected Mr. Schutt ita chairman; Mr. Roos, secretary. Mr. Heilmann, who really had brought together the meeting, made a speech ...

    German
    II A 1, III A, I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 29, 1871
    Letter from Professor E. Duis, Dixon, Illinois to the Staats Zeitung

    The more I look at American life, the more do I become convinced that the American needs the compulsory school system... A German teacher's Association is planned for Chicago with the aim of mutual education and also discussion of the various methods of instruction. In order to start on this fertile road, every German teacher should take advantage of the good suggestions our paper has disseminated; then the beneficent effect on the American schools will soon be visible... Every German teacher should make it his special task to transmit the German language in its purity to the young generation and to put an end to the nonsense of the so-called "Pennsylvania Dutch."

    It already may be regarded as certain that Germandom will play in no distant future an eminent role in America...

    The more I look at American life, the more do I become convinced that the American needs the compulsory school system... A German teacher's Association is planned for Chicago with ...

    German
    I A 1 a, III A, II A 1, I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 08, 1871
    [German Teachers Meet]

    A number of teachers met yesterday in the "Deutsche Gesellschaft" in order to receive the report of the Constitutional Committee of the German-American Teachers Association. On some paragraphs extensive debates ensued. The conception of "German-American" particularly caused difficulties. With one minor change the Constitution was adopted. The Messrs Roos, Hansen, Schutz, Kindinger, Henschel and Chronik were elected provisory members of the board. They themselves named Mr. Hansen, President; Mr. Roos, Vice-President; Kindinger, Secretary; Schutt, Treasurer; Dr. Chronik, Librarian; and Henschel Auditor.

    A number of teachers met yesterday in the "Deutsche Gesellschaft" in order to receive the report of the Constitutional Committee of the German-American Teachers Association. On some paragraphs extensive debates ...

    German
    II A 1, III A, I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 03, 1871
    [The German-American School System]

    If one wants to have good pupils, one first must have good teachers. This fact the gentlemen of the School Board don't seem to have yet understood. They do not say, that in order to have good pupils one must have good women-teachers, but they show through their actions that they are deeply convinced of the truth of this statement. We surely do not belong to those who would deny to women the ability of teaching. We are even convinced that for schools for the smallest children (Kleinkinderschulen) a good woman teacher is to be preferred to a good male teacher. But if one asserts, as the Superintendent has done, that the women have shown themselves better teachers of the German language than the men, one must have selected intentionally, or from ignorance, the worst men teachers.

    In today's session of the School Board, the Committee for the German Language is scheduled to give its report on the examinations of women-teachers. The German-American School Society of Chicago is going to present a petition in which it will be explained at length why men also should be admitted to the examinations, respectively why they should have a chance to be appointed as teachers of German.

    2

    We hope that this time the Committee for German instruction - the Messrs. Wunsche, Richberg, and Schintz will fight on the side of reason. Mr. Schintz who could adduce like no one else, the most convincing proofs for the appointment of German men-teachers, unfortunately is (as he is said to have expressed himself) to intensely occupied with his own practical future that it is quite impossible for him to think of his pedagogical present.

    The question of money, with which one counters our argument, should not be considered, quite aside from the fact that the men-teachers offer to teach for the same salary as the women. The German language, at present, is being taught in the public schools almost in the same way as one teaches a dead language, the poor students are being badgered with vocabulary and spelling, but of the spirit and the individuality of the language, they hear nothing. And it is a question if this system could not be changed by the appointment of some able German men-teachers. We are inclined to answer in the affirmative.

    If one wants to have good pupils, one first must have good teachers. This fact the gentlemen of the School Board don't seem to have yet understood. They do not ...

    German
    I A 1 b, I K, III B 2