The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 18, 1861
    Polytechnical School (Editorial)

    About two years ago a member of our editorial staff, who at that time was also Mechanic's Institute, advocated the erection of a polytechnical school in Illinois. The Institute adopted the detailed recommendation, and in 1859 Representative C. Butz introduced a proposal to the state legislature to investigate the suitability of a Chicago site. The proposal was referred to a committee, and owing to the confusion of that session (a result of a Democratic majority in the legislature) nothing more was heard of it. Mechanic's Institute has again taken up this matter, and has sent its president to Springfield to urge in person the acceptance of a bill recommending that polytechnical school be established in Chicago. The necessary money could be raised by selling part of the ground appropriated for a college; the most valuable part of this property lies in Cook County. The interest yielded by the sum realized through the sale of this land would be sufficient to defray the cost of operating such an institution. The importance of a poly 2technical school has been explained previously. It would be a school to provide higher training for mechanics, machinists, contractors, engineers, and farmers, and it would have a beneficial effect on the agriculture and industry of the entire country.

    Furthermore, it would relieve the overcrowding of professions (medicine, law, etc.) by the children of farmers and tradesmen, inasmuch as it would create a new social class which would be sufficiently educated to maintain an equal position in society with college educated people--although it had no such education--and would also serve to counterbalance the abstract and one-sided education which is now in vogue.

    About two years ago a member of our editorial staff, who at that time was also Mechanic's Institute, advocated the erection of a polytechnical school in Illinois. The Institute adopted ...

    German
    I A 1 a, II A 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 06, 1866
    Gymnastics in Public Schools

    In the meeting which the School Board held last evening, Inspector Brentano read a proposal of the Chicago Turn Gemeinde, requesting that gymnastics be included in the regular schedule of all public high schools, and that teachers be engaged to instruct the children in that branch of physical education. The proposal was unanimously adopted, and the Executive Board was instructed to take all necessary measures.

    In the meeting which the School Board held last evening, Inspector Brentano read a proposal of the Chicago Turn Gemeinde, requesting that gymnastics be included in the regular schedule of ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 3, I A 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 11, 1867
    The High School (Editorial)

    According to reliable reports, a plan is being considered to transfer the high school which is now located on the West Side of the city of Chicago (and thus is practically inaccessible to people who live on the North Side) to a place where it can be reached from all three parts of the city with equal ease and comfort. The place referred to is Dearborn Park, on Michigan Avenue. Since it is close to the junction of the horsecar lines, pupils who live on the outskirts of the South and West Sides could reach it without the least difficulty, and North Siders, too, would find it within easy reach.

    The site has been deeded to the city by the Federal Government with the understanding that it is to be used for public purposes. The value of the property has increased greatly since the presentation. In fact, its present 2worth makes its use for park-purposes prohibitive. As a park, it has no more value for Chicago than the Battery has for the city of New York, which has spent millions to add more ground to the little plot, without succeeding in making it more attractive even as a place to take a stroll; but as a building site it has an immense value.

    Now, if the city council would consent (that is all that is necessary), a magnificent building could be erected in Dearborn Park, a building which would not only be a credit to the architectural taste and skill of our citizens and contractors, but could also be made a source of income for the school treasury, if its basement were rented to businessmen for storage purposes. The net proceeds from rentals could be used to improve the high school to such an extent that it would compare favorably with the best secondary schools of Europe, and prepare its students for entry into universities.

    We are of the opinion that this plan is fully in keeping with the marvelous 3progress which the city has made during the past decade. The good reputation which our school system already has won among the intelligent citizens of our country is no reason why we should halt in our endeavors to progress, but should be an incentive to continue in our efforts to make our educational institutions more adequate to their purpose; and we are convinced that the plan outlined above would be a long step toward that end.

    According to reliable reports, a plan is being considered to transfer the high school which is now located on the West Side of the city of Chicago (and thus is ...

    German
    I A 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 17, 1871
    Meeting of the School Board.

    Schintz read an invitation for the peace festival (Franco-Prussian War) and moved to close the schools on the day of the celebration.

    Stone opposed the motion, because, as he said, there was no peace as yet in France.

    Walsh said it would hardly be sensible to send the children on the street for that carousal.

    Schintz believed one owed it to the children to let them enjoy the parade, just as one closed the schools on July 4.

    The motion thereupon was adopted with all against one (Stone's) vote.

    Schintz read an invitation for the peace festival (Franco-Prussian War) and moved to close the schools on the day of the celebration. Stone opposed the motion, because, as he said, ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, I G, III H, III A, I A 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 20, 1871
    Germans to the Front!

    The strangest concession which recently has been made by the American press to German spirit and solid vigor we find in an editorial of the Chicago Evening Post under the headline "The Restoration of Germany".

    After pointing to the elements of a higher civilization and genuine popular freedom he finds that in the newly founded German Empire, he makes the following application to American conditions"...."At last the Germans have become conscious of their strength and we hope much good from that for American politics. We are far from wishing to emphasize racial differences....however we stand just now in a crisis regarding our fate, caused by the impudent encroachment of a foreign (Irish) nationality which, brought up in ignorance and living in undisciplined sensuality, has gained, thanks to its priests and its demagogues, absolute domination over the biggest state in the Union...Now the time has come for the Germans to assert themselves as Teutons (as against the Celtic element of our population)...and to save true freedom and civilization just as their brothers on the other side of the bigpond did when they annihilated the corrupt and degenerate Caesarism of the Gaul gang".

    2

    According to this the Americans wish the Germans to help them to get rid of Irish mob rule, and this may very well be accomplished if only the Americans themselves will collaborate, and will exercise their right to vote. However, it is well-known that the majority of the well-to-do Americans abstain from voting and completely ignore politics. Wealth has throttled the voice of patriotism; the successive luxury and frivolity of our so-called higher (i. e. wealthier) classes has produced an enervation which abominates any exertion.

    The fate of New York will engulf all the cities of the Union if it is not checked while there is time. The rising of the German masses throughout the country has the effect of a tonic on the weakened American nerves - which, it is true, hardly twenty years back found themselves insulted by the smell of German sauerkraut and were irritated (in the years 1854 and 1855) to the point of an attack of "know-nothing" fever. However, we may forget this and we have long since forgiven it.

    3

    That the inevitable antagonism of the Celtic and the Germanic races will lead on American soil, too, to bloody encounters that, at the moment, can still be doubted. But that this battle may be fought in a dignified way to the end that the Americans themselves could greatly contribute, if they will accept our counsel and introduce the German language into all public schools in this country. The removal of all sectarian elements from our free schools will further form a main fortress against the encroachments of all kinds of bigoted sects. The priests ("Pfaffen") at all times have been the first ones to weld the yoke of despotism to the neck of a free people, because the unfree spirit of the uneducated individual eagerly surrenders to the belief in a freely invented super-natural.

    Give us free schools and the limping devil retreats. The free spirit finds the free God without help.

    The strangest concession which recently has been made by the American press to German spirit and solid vigor we find in an editorial of the Chicago Evening Post under the ...

    German
    I C, III C, I A 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 29, 1871
    Letter from Professor E. Duis, Dixon, Illinois to the Staats Zeitung

    The more I look at American life, the more do I become convinced that the American needs the compulsory school system... A German teacher's Association is planned for Chicago with the aim of mutual education and also discussion of the various methods of instruction. In order to start on this fertile road, every German teacher should take advantage of the good suggestions our paper has disseminated; then the beneficent effect on the American schools will soon be visible... Every German teacher should make it his special task to transmit the German language in its purity to the young generation and to put an end to the nonsense of the so-called "Pennsylvania Dutch."

    It already may be regarded as certain that Germandom will play in no distant future an eminent role in America...

    The more I look at American life, the more do I become convinced that the American needs the compulsory school system... A German teacher's Association is planned for Chicago with ...

    German
    I A 1 a, III A, II A 1, I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 05, 1871
    German Ideas (Reprint from the Pittsburgher Volksblatt)

    Some American papers still confess their fear and anxiety at being Germanized.. But just what they don't want to be, they already partly are...Take, for example, the question of compulsory schooling. That is a "German idea". When it was first agitated here, only ten German-Americans went to bat for it. But the German idea gained ground from year to year. Already the states, New Hampshire, Michigan, even Texas have adopted compulsory school laws aside from Massachusetts and Vermont, where this institution existed long ago. In California the Republican Party which will probably win at the impending election, has come out for compulsory schooling, In Nebraska the people will vote soon on the new State Constitution, which, among other things, empowers the Legislature to introduce compulsory school attendance.

    Even those who are devoted to Americanism in the narrower sense resist ever so stubbornly - the good German ideas spread farther and farther in the United States every year. But not to the disadvantage of the Anglo-Americans. By the enlargement of their intellectual awareness, by the transition of the stiff, one-sided, narrow Americanism into a state and nation that is penetrated with the spirit of Cosmopolitanism, they cannot lose, but only win.....

    Some American papers still confess their fear and anxiety at being Germanized.. But just what they don't want to be, they already partly are...Take, for example, the question of compulsory ...

    German
    III A, I F 4, I A 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 08, 1871
    [Political Matters]

    If the next president of the United States - or the next presidential candidate of the Republican Party is named Schulze or Muller, Grant, or Trumbull, Piefke, or Purzpichler - that is not so important as that the program of the Republican Party be a progressive one. Under a progressive program we understand one that does not, so to speak, undertake to correct a few misprints in the work of the past, but one that contains new, as yet unexpressed ideas that have matured during the last decade.

    One such, would be the reform of the civil administration. Furthermore, the Republican Party should put into its program the representation of minorities that Illinois has adopted. Illinois has made a beginning with putting in the place of the rule of 51 over 49, that of 99 over 1, in the peace of majority rule that of the people.

    Furthermore, the question of compulsory school attendance should be considered. This, too, is one of those "German ideas" that have become acclimatized in America, and to which the Demosthenes' who always unctiously admonish the Germans to bow before the Anglo-Americans, have contributed not the slightest bit. What the country needs is a thorough reform of its educational system. This, of course, is in the first place the task of the individual states. 2However, a national convention could start the ball rolling without by any means promoting encroachments of Federal jurisdiction into the sphere of the individual states.

    If the next president of the United States - or the next presidential candidate of the Republican Party is named Schulze or Muller, Grant, or Trumbull, Piefke, or Purzpichler - ...

    German
    I A 1 a, I H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 16, 1871
    [Visual Education in the Public Schools]

    The St. Louis German papers justly rejoice about the partial introduction of the German teaching method( so-called "visual instruction") into the public schools of their city. It has, been ordered that every week one hour of physics shall be taught with Hotze's "First Lessons of Physics" as a test... The Chicago School Board would do well to imitate St. Louis' example.

    Until now, in the middle schools here, no word of physics is being taught, and of gases and their qualities, of thermometer and barometer, of the three forms of aggregation, the vast majority of the pupils who do not enter high school, never hear the faintest syllable.

    The St. Louis German papers justly rejoice about the partial introduction of the German teaching method( so-called "visual instruction") into the public schools of their city. It has, been ordered ...

    German
    I A 1 a, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 25, 1871
    (The Illinois Staats Zeitung Reviews an Examination of School Children That Had Taken Place in California, and Gives Samples of Boners. Then it Continues:)

    The instruction of many years, one sees, has been less useful than no instruction at all would have been. But that at last the evil is being recognized by the Americans themselves is the first step toward an improvement. In San Francisco and California a man is going to come to the helm (namely, when in a short while Mr. Bolander is elected State School Superintendent) who will apply the right cure, namely, the introduction of a rational method of instruction based on German principles of education. "Multum, non multa" is the slogan of this method. Its intention is to educate the students to independent thinking.

    "The child is the father of the man." No wonder that our free schools have become the fathers of such men as the vast average number of Americans now are. All seem to be cut to the same pattern. There is something Chinese-like (learned by heart) in these heads. Everywhere one finds the same ideas, or rather, their absence, the same lack of independent thinking, the same unoriginality; and, springing from this source, this pathological mania for sensations of all kind, especially sensational and scandalous trials. In them one seeks a compensation for the lack of originality and the uneventfulness 2of the life of the average man.

    The question of the method of instruction, therefore appears as the most important political and cultural question (Staats und Lebensfrage) of the United States. To solve it completely it will need by far, more energy and talent than have up to now been expended on it - more than at present are available for it.

    The instruction of many years, one sees, has been less useful than no instruction at all would have been. But that at last the evil is being recognized by the ...

    German
    I A 1 a, III A, III H