The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 18, 1861
    Lincoln's Administration

    The character of Lincoln's administration is sufficiently presaged by the brief but concise addresses which he made in Indianapolis, Cincinnati, etc. He will do his sacred duty, and he will do his whole duty, toward the Constitution as well as toward the Republican party.

    The Springfield Journal, which is undoubtedly familiar with Lincoln's aims, confirms this. This publication writes:

    "We would be guilty of neglecting our duty, if we did not urge the Republicans to abide by the principles upon which they elected Mr. Lincoln president. We know that he will be true to them until the last. We can be just, and we can be generous, but we cannot surrender the highest and most sacred principle that ever inspired men in a political or military battle. Mr. Lincoln is on his way to Washington, and in a few days, if he lives that long, his ideas, policies, and purposes will be made known to the world. They will 2be admired and supported by all good men in this country and in other countries. His heart embraces the entire country; he will speak and act in behalf of this nation, and, if necessary, he will lay down his life for it. No friend of humanity, of liberty, of the Constitution, of the Union, and of the high ideals of this country need have the slightest doubt that Abraham Lincoln will firmly support them. He believes that the Republican cause is just, and he will not desert it. Some party leaders may succumb to the storm of treason and be swept away, but that will not happen in the case of the brave, loyal, truth-loving President whom we have elected. He may be broken by the power of slavery or by the treason of friends, but he will not submit to them.

    "Mr. Lincoln believes that the people of the United States can alter or abolish their present form of government if they wish to do so. He will place no obstacle in their way. If the people desire to change the Constitution, he will not try to hinder them. But as long as the Constitution remains what it is--the highest law of the country--he 3will look upon it as such, and will faithfully execute the laws which have been enacted in accordance to this law, as he has sworn to do. He can do no less, and he is not the least inclined to do less. His oath, to perform the duties prescribed by the Constitution, is recorded in heaven. He will perform these duties, come what may. He will insist that all forts, arsenals, postoffices, mints, and other national property now being illegally withheld, be returned to its rightful owner, except in those cases where the United States' right to possession has been transferred elsewhere, in constitutional manner. This is a duty imposed upon him by the Constitution, and everyone who loves our Government, regardless of his party affiliations or the section of the country in which he lives, will support Mr. Lincoln and assist him in doing his duty.

    "We have appealed to the Republicans to abide by their principles. Since we love our country, the only free country in the whole world, we could do no less. We have demanded that these principles shall not be surrendered, not for the attainment of party purposes nor to humiliate political enemies; 4for we believe that everything which free men in this country and in every other country esteem very highly depends on the triumph of these principles.

    "We do not imagine that freedom can keep the upper hand in this country without a battle, but we are ready and willing to fight. We have never despaired of the life of the Republic, and we do not despair now. Men who are influenced by the madness which is now prevalent may injure the most sacred cause of our time, and states may leave the Union which the majority of their inhabitants love, but reason will return, and misguided states and people will return to their duties. Through this seeming impenetrable darkness our faith perceives the glorious sun of the future. We believe that Abraham Lincoln will do his full duty to his country and the cause which he advocates, no matter how difficult that task may be, and that in 1864 he will leave a united, prosperous, and happy country to his successor in office."

    The character of Lincoln's administration is sufficiently presaged by the brief but concise addresses which he made in Indianapolis, Cincinnati, etc. He will do his sacred duty, and he will ...

    German
    I J, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 19, 1861
    Seventh Ward Seward Club

    The following resolutions were unanimously adopted in a meeting which the Seventh Ward Club and the Seward Club held Saturday evening, February 16, 1861.

    Whereas, Several Chicago meat packers and grain merchants are doing everything they possibly can during the current week to support the compromisers in the Senate and the House of Representatives, by stating that nineteen twentieths of the Republicans of Chicago are in favor of compromise; therefore be it

    Resolved, That we consider honesty to be a prime virtue in business as well as in politics, and that we deem it a great injustice that those gentlemen want to barter free territories to slavery, and that they approve of such bartering because now they probably are not able to buy as much pork and flour as they were wont; further

    2

    That those gentlemen are guilty of an infamous lie when they claim that they represent nineteen twentieths of the Republican party of Chicago; for in the Seventh Ward alone there are more than twelve hundred Germans who are affiliated with the Republican party, and thus far we have not heard of a single one among them who approves of such an ignominious compromise as the Kellogg Compromise; further

    That we are firmly resolved to a bide by the Chicago platform and to oppose any and every compromise which cedes even an inch of free territory to slavery, and will hand over those of our representatives who barter free territories to slavery to the scorn and contempt of the present and future generations.

    The gentlemen speak of a dictatorship which the Tribune is trying to exercise over them, but to which they will not submit. And they wax angry, very angry, indeed. Poor Tribune, you had better tremble--for didn't you adhere to and defend the principles of the Republican Party?

    3

    However, the gentlemen referred to apparently do not know that the Rebels have insulted our flag and stolen our forts, our ships, our money, and our weapons--that they have heaped shame upon our flag and humiliated it in the sight of the world; these acts seem to be of no consequence to these men whose sole honor and distinction seems to consist of making money. The Southerners have long had the privilege of making and ridiculing the North, of tarring and feathering the opponents of slavery, and as a reward for such acts we are to donate the free territories to them; for they are our dear, dear brothers of the South! Do you not notice a trace of dictatorship in their conduct? Therefore, be it further

    Resolved, That we declare the proposed compromise of Mr. Kellogg treason to the Republican party and openly comdemn it.

    In conclusion we would say that these resolutions will be published in the English language and German language newspapers, and a copy will be sent to each of our congressmen. We ask all German Republican clubs of Chicago 4to voice their opinions on this matter.

    H. Hett, President; C. Scheef, Secretary; Seward Club Philipp Wetzel, President; E. Kaeseburg, Secretary; Seventh Ward Club

    The following resolutions were unanimously adopted in a meeting which the Seventh Ward Club and the Seward Club held Saturday evening, February 16, 1861. Whereas, Several Chicago meat packers and ...

    German
    I J, I F 2, I F 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 27, 1861
    Resolutions of the Seward Club

    The following resolutions were passed in a meeting held by the Seward Club, February 23, 1861:

    Whereas, An amendment to the present charter of the city of Chicago was adopted by the Illinois State Legislature at Springfield, abolishing the Board of Sewers, Streets, and Water, and replacing it with a Board of Public Works consisting of three commissioners who are to be elected by the voters of Chicago next spring; therefore be it

    Resolved, That we, as German-Republican citizens of the North Side, consider it necessary that a citizen of German descent be elected to this Board to represent the interest of Germans and to protect the rights and the welfare of the working class; further

    That we will exert our influence only in behalf of a man who possesses the necessary qualifications and ability; further 2That we appeal to all German-Republican clubs of the city to co-operate with us in our endeavors to gain our objective when the next municipal election is held.

    The following resolutions were passed in a meeting held by the Seward Club, February 23, 1861: Whereas, An amendment to the present charter of the city of Chicago was adopted ...

    German
    I J, I F 2, I F 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 21, 1861
    Meat of Dead Animals Sold in City (Editorial)

    Last week we made a tour of North Kinzie Street. Of course we saw no large business establishments, such as one sees on Clark Street or Lake Street, but we did see a number of butcher shops, and instinctively our thoughts turned to the sale of human beings in the South. Here we saw meat the color of which could not be discerned; it was neither red, white, nor yellow, but had a tinge of black, an indication that the animals were dead before they were butchered. We accidentally met two experienced butchers and they confirmed our fears.

    Are there no officers in our city who have the authority to put a stop to this fraud? Why control the bakers but not the butchers who are guilty of many serious violations of the law, and whose offenses are much more detrimental to the health of the community than those of the bakers?

    2

    There are people who make a regular business of buying dead or half-dead animals and selling the meat to commission men. We hope that our most wise city fathers will pass an ordinance similar to the one which is in force in the East, making it mandatory that all meat offered for sale must be brought to the public market, which is under the control of the city--that is the express purpose of maintaining a public market, but ours is never used. [Translator's note: The author does not reveal, nor is the writer able to ascertain in what manner the city controlled the quality of goods offered for sale in the public market.]

    Last week we made a tour of North Kinzie Street. Of course we saw no large business establishments, such as one sees on Clark Street or Lake Street, but we ...

    German
    I M, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 21, 1861
    Carl Schurz and the Sardinia Embassy (Editorial)

    The appointment of an ambassador to Turin was of special interest, not because of the character of those who sought this post, but because of the eventual recognition or nonrecognition of the German Republicans of the United States. We admit that we were not favorably impressed when we learned that Mr. [Carl] Schurz had not been selected for the mission. After Governor Koerner had been defrauded of the ambassadorship at Berlin through a political coup of Mr. Judd of Chicago, Mr. Schurz was the only representative German aspirant to a foreign embassy, and he was especially entitled to the promotion, since he not only had the support of his state, as is often the case with American politicians, but also the indorsement of the Germans of every state in the Union. This support undoubtedly was evidence that the Germans of the Union wanted to be acknowledged coequal with native Americans in at least one respect--whenever appointments to 2foreign positions were in question. Their concern with Mr. Schurz was based solely on the German's desire to nominate their worthiest and ablest representative.

    They were not successful in their attempts to wrest such recognition from the national pride of native Americans; and an appointment to Rio de Janeiro can never be looked upon as adequate compensation.

    Secretary of State Seward even went so far as to establish a principle according to which all foreign-born persons will be excluded from the foreign service--if such a thing is possible. We deplore the narrow-mindedness from which this principle emanated.

    In the first place, we must not overlook the fact that foreign-born citizens who know a foreign language are best qualified to represent the United States abroad. The New York Tribune was right when it stated, in defense of Mr. Schurz's claim, that his Prussian extraction was an argument for, and not 3against, his appointment to the Court of Turin. Italy, which was liberated through the revolution brought about by the revolutionist Garibaldi, would have no scruples about recognizing the former German revolutionist, especially since he would not be serving in that capacity, but rather as an American citizen. However, we shall not enumerate the excuses which Washington offered for denying the request of Mr. Schurz, the German-American citizen par excellence. It would be useless to discuss them anyway: but the lesson which this German reversal teaches is very instructive.

    We learn from it that even the greatest services rendered by an eminent German to a political party and, in this case, to the Union itself, are not sufficient to offset the influence of American narrow-mindedness and greed for office. The battle of the Germans for recognition of their co-equality with native Americans in the Union is by no means ended, and they have no other recourse but to apply means which are more effective than either the influence of individuals, be they ever so prominent, or the 4resolutions of the Central Committee of the Republican party.

    The coequality of the Germans must be explained to the masses in city, county, and state until even the most stubborn are convinced and the feeble-minded can understand--before any attempt is made to enlighten the upper classes. Thus, it is necessary that German sheriffs be elected, and that, if possible, a German representative and German senator be seated in every state legislature in the United States, and the next step of the Germans, especially those in the northwest, should be to bring about the election of German congressmen.

    It is said that New England congressmen prevented the appointment of Mr. Schurz; and it will be the duty of the Germans to erase this score by electing German congressional representatives. In days gone by the Germans were not competent to fill public offices, but this inefficiency is being remedied in some quarters, at least to some extent, and in a short time there will be no dearth of qualified German candidates. The old adage, 5"Who does not progress must retrogress" is true close of German-Americans.

    The knowledge that their native culture was a predominant element in the progressive development of the American nation must be an incentive to the Germans of the Union to continue their collaborative efforts in shaping the social, political, and economic affairs of this nation; and, to that end they must aspire to the higher, even the highest, public offices. This must be the aim of all German-Americans for the sake of those native Americans who instinctively fear and try to avert any interference in their turbulent national matters by inexperienced elements.

    The appointment of an ambassador to Turin was of special interest, not because of the character of those who sought this post, but because of the eventual recognition or nonrecognition ...

    German
    I F 4, I F 1, I F 5, I J, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 29, 1861
    Chicago Turngemeinde Form Militia (Editorial)

    Under the name of Union Cadets, a number of members of the local Turngemeinde have formed a militia which will be a part of the Sixtieth Regiment. Forty men have already signed. This evening another meeting will be held at Kinzie Hall, and final organization will be effected, officers will be elected, etc. All young men who desire to join the company are requested to be present at this meeting.

    We heartily indorse this military movement and hope that in maneuvering and vaulting the German Union Cadets will eventually be superior to the well-known Zouave Cadets. Of course such activity requires more endurance than that which the "Sunday" and "holiday" militia displayed. Fortunately the latter have just about ceased to exist, and their arms, which have been stored in the basement of the Court House, are a memento mori in a two-fold 2sense of the expression.

    Under the name of Union Cadets, a number of members of the local Turngemeinde have formed a militia which will be a part of the Sixtieth Regiment. Forty men have ...

    German
    III B 2, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 02, 1861
    Report of the Agent for the German Society of Chicago for the Month of March

    Employment furnished for 105
    Free tickets for needy 2
    Tickets at reduced prices 3
    Board and lodging for poor travelers 6
    Furnished medicine and medical attention for 11
    Found lost baggage for 3
    Found relatives or friends for 30
    Help in financial matters for 3
    Wrote letters for 61
    Referred to County for medical aid, or lodging and board 27

    Collected for, and donated to, sick:

    Firewood 31/2 cords
    Various kinds of flour 190 pounds
    2
    Potatoes 31/2 bushels
    Beans 6 quarts
    Barley 5 pounds
    Soup-meat 58 pounds
    Old clothing given to 6
    Used shoes 12 pairs

    Chicago, Illinois, March 31, 1861.

    F. Schlund, Agent.

    <table> <tr> <td>Employment furnished for</td> <td>105</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Free tickets for needy</td> <td>2</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Tickets at reduced prices</td> <td>3</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Board and lodging for poor travelers</td> <td>6</td> </tr> ...

    German
    II D 10, II D 3, II D 8
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 02, 1861
    Address by Alexander Stephens on the New Gospel of Slavery (Editorial)

    The address which the Vice-President of the Confederate States of America (that is, the Cotton States) made in Savannah might open the eyes of our Democratic fellow citizens, for it reveals the infamous fraud which the leaders of the Democratic party have practiced for many years. These leaders did not tire of accusing the Republicans of depriving slaveholders of their constitutional rights, (or of entirely invalidating these rights) and have continually maintained that the South, therefore, had good reason to suspect any Republican administration; that its act in leaving the Union was justified to some extent; and that great concessions, even changes in the Constitution of the United States, would be necessary to remove this suspicion.

    However, one need only read the address of Stephens, or the Montgomery 2Constitution, to see that what is wanted is not merely a matter of granting great concessions, but of surrendering the fundamental principles upon which the Constitution of the United States is founded. Everywhere in the South it is argued that the "conflict" between slavery and free labor cannot be settled; that, therefore, a return of the Cotton States to the Union is impossible; and that the North must either recognize the Confederate States and permit them to go their way in peace, or accept the new "Gospel of Slavery" which is contained in the Montgomery Constitution and was explained with much pomp and show by Mr. Stephens. Wherein lies the fundamental difference between the ideas which are now prevalent in the South and those which are embodied in the Constitution of the United States?

    Let us hear Mr. Stephens on the subject. He says concerning Thomas Jefferson and the other framers of the Constitution of the United States: "The leading thought which he and most statesmen had, at the time when the old Constitution was written, was that the enslavement of natives of Africa is contrary 3to the laws of nature; that it is wrong in principle, and from a social, moral, and political standpoint. It was an evil with which they could not cope very well, but the general opinion of that generation was that the institution would vanish in one way or another, under the government of Divine Providence. "These ideas were fundamentally wrong. They were based on the assumption that races are equal. That was an error; it was a foundation of sand; and when the storm came, and the winds blew, the government founded on it crumbled."

    Thus we see where the difficulties of the slaveholders lay. It was not the victory of the Republican party and the subsequent apprehension which drove the South from the Union, but the insufficient guarantees offered by the old Constitution, in which the very word "slavery" has been carefully omitted, while "the stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner" in the Montgomery Constitution;

    Stephens characterizes this new cornerstone as follows:

    4

    "Our Government is founded on the very opposite idea; its foundation is laid, and its cornerstone rests, on the great truth that the negro is not the equal of the white man; that the natural and moral condition of the negro is slavery, subordination the a higher race."

    Though the proof adduced for the correctness this moral precept, which does not permit the negro to eat the bread which he has produced in the "sweat of his brow" is very weak indeed, yet it is not the first time in history that selfish man has applied sophisms to justify very great injustices. And the South apparently is doing just that now. These new apostles of slavery are just as obsessed by their ideas as were the Anabaptists of Muenster in the year 1525, or the virtue-terrorists of the French National Convention (1792-95) during the French Revolution. They think that they are right and that the North is wrong. They consider themselves discoverers of new moral and economic truths, and look upon Northerners as narrow-minded fanatics.

    Time alone can cure this evil delusion of the South; it would merely tend to 5increase the delusion if one attempted to apply violent measures. The Union is reaping the fruit of neglecting the education of both Southerners and Northerners. If the education of the people of the North had been more general and broader, the Democratic party would have been overthrown before the delusion of the South had grown as strong as it is now, and at a time when there was hope of healing the breach which had been created within the Union. Of course, the sly leaders are taking advantage of the ignorance of the mass of the poor whites to justify every manner of dubious act, from the lynching of an alleged "abolitionist" or a raise in price on all goods manufactured in the North (due of course to a tax imposed on such goods), to the attack upon United States forts and the conquest of new territory in the Southwest for slavery.

    We shall not deplore the disadvantages and the confusion of the present situation, whether the Union is reconstructed or not. No doubt it will be, if only this one great truth is recognized and observed in practice: Our 6modern civilization must choose between a better, a more thorough education of the people and anarchy, whether it be in permanent form, as it is in South American republics, or a periodically moderated despotism, as it prevailed in ancient Rome and Greece.

    The address which the Vice-President of the Confederate States of America (that is, the Cotton States) made in Savannah might open the eyes of our Democratic fellow citizens, for it ...

    German
    I H, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 11, 1861
    Annual Report of the Treasurer of the German Society of Chicago

    Receipts

    Balance in Treasury on April 9th, 1860 $249.92
    Dues collected 227.89
    Donations received 49.25
    Proceeds from fair and ball 670.03
    Interest on loans 17.25
    Payment on note 3.00
    Payment of loan 4.50
    Sale of empty barrels 1.30
    Total $1,223.14

    Disbursements

    Donations to charitable purposes, Agent's salary, and miscellaneous expenses

    2
    $635.16
    Balance on April 6th, 1861 587.98

    The latter sum, together with a note for $2.50 is in the hands of the treasurer.

    Ernst Kirchner

    Receipts <table> <tr> <td>Balance in Treasury on April 9th, 1860</td> <td>$249.92</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Dues collected</td> <td>227.89</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Donations received</td> <td>49.25</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Proceeds from fair and ball</td> <td>670.03</td> </tr> ...

    German
    III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 05, 1861
    German Companies in Camp (Editorial)

    Various rumors have been spread concerning the situation of German companies. We advise our fellow citizens to be very careful about accepting reports that German companies are badly treated or disbanded. These rumors are seldom reliable, and it is much wiser to believe the statements of honest members of the companies themselves, and form one's opinion on the basis of what they have to say. Captain Schambeck visited our office and gave us an oral report on conditions, and we have received information through the mail from good honest Captain Lippert, who is at Camp Yates, and also from our friend Eduard Bornemann, ensign in the Turner Company.

    All the German companies from Chicago, which are in Camp Cairo and Camp Springfield, have been accepted for service and assigned to regiments.

    2

    These companies are:

    At Camp Cairo (Turner) Union Cadets, Captain Kowalt Lincoln Rifles, Captain Mihaloz

    At Camp Yates

    Union Rifles, Number 1, Captain Lippert

    Union Rifles, Number 2, Captain Iten

    Washington Light Cavalry, Captain Schambeck

    Washington Light Infantry, Captain Mattern

    The troops are in good humor and are well cared for; as a rule enrollment into active service puts an end to any complaints, and everybody is satisfied. Captain Schambeck, who brought us this information, says that these conditions 3are a result of the ceaseless efforts of Lieutenant Governor Hoffmann. It will be interesting to the relatives of the Chicagoans who are in camp to know that Captain Schambeck will be at Hottinger and Kastler's, on Randolph Street, today from 9 to 12 A. M. and from 1 to 3 P. M., and again tomorrow, from 9 to 12 A. M., to give anyone wishing for reliable news a true account of conditions in his camp.

    Genuine Turners

    The Union Cadets are brave boys; they do not believe in half-way methods. Not only did they ask for the honor of filling the most dangerous positions in Camp Cairo; not only did they drill so diligently and energetically that they are now able to compete with the crack Zouave Company; but they have also reorganized their Turnverein in camp, Officers elected are: A. Erbe, First Speaker; C. Bornemann, Secretary; horizontal bars were erected, and 4so "Kinzie Hall" was transferred to Camp Cairo. That's the way, boys! Good luck to you!

    Various rumors have been spread concerning the situation of German companies. We advise our fellow citizens to be very careful about accepting reports that German companies are badly treated or ...

    German
    III D, I G